Hot answers tagged

85

Spell it out to the user. You don't want to leave them guessing so I would recommend you add a simple addition to your UI. Note the change of language in the search box. By saying choose location you are more or less saying "do it here", whereby now it is clear it is just one of two options.


60

The user might be clicking on it without the expectation of any interaction. Would you be recording clicks for actions like: Selecting text to be copied Mobile users scrolling Right clicking to open web browsers context menu Clicking on the page to focus the web browser window To close any drop down menus from the top bar of the website In most of these ...


52

Just to think outside the box I've decided to paste a radical suggestion to this, as I have called it "map-tap" problem :) Imagine if a low opacity touch gesture image appeared over the map either for a few seconds and then disappear or it would stay there, lingering like a ghost, hinting to the user what to do. When a user taps the map it would disappear. ...


42

Try being explicit with a set of buttons, and tie the [continue] button to the action. Since users have to choose one of a set of available sessions, try disabling the CONTINUE button, so it's apparent they can't move forward. Pair that with a set of buttons aligned above the next step, and experiment with a label that's clear (you can test which text is the ...


35

Good question. I can only offer my opinion, no research. In my opinion, it seems as though doing this is mixing 2 separate actions on one element (I've done it myself in the past). I've come to the conclusion that the navigation click action on the "Services" item should be removed. You will face further problems when people use touch screens. E.g. when ...


26

I would personally go one step further: Let the user select the session, and that then brings directly to the next screen. There's probably no need to select first and then confirm in that scenario. The text of the button could be "Select", "Choose", "Continue", "Book"... It could possibly be more explicit about the ...


24

As I've learnt – the more options you provide for the same actions – the better the application is. So the advice would be to implement both drag-n-drop and click-to-add, and you don’t have to worry about which one users use. Even better, you have the option to track which one is most popular in your specific case, which may differ from an existing more ...


21

You could de-emphasize the search field, e.g. by not showing it by default. Just say "Choose a location" in the head of the screen, and have a magnifying glass button that pops up the search field for people who want to enter an address. Something like this: Even if you don't go with this approach, you might want to adjust your text sizes and wording. "...


19

Have you considered moving the map, rather than moving the "pin"? Scrolling a map is a common action in most map applications, if you keep the reticule static and move the map underneath it, the user can target their desired position. The text in the box should update as the user scrolls. This might allow you to get away with no additional help messaging. ...


14

You buttons should always say what they do. Avoid vague terms and, most especially, do not confuse the user by having a single button do two things! Also, giving the user two text fields can cause issue - if I only type something into the second box, what happens? UX Movement has an article on naming buttons: Why Your Form Buttons Should Never Say 'Submit'. ...


12

Since users are likely to see the entry form first, how about using the placeholder text for this? "Enter location or just pick from map ..."


12

Scrolling down and then up and then clicking on non-interactive things is a sign that the user was looking for something, didn't find it, and is now trying less-obvious interactions to see if it'll be revealed. Without knowing more about your product or UI, it's hard to guess what they're missing, but I'd bet that a task test with 5-12 users would be ...


10

In general - don't use hover to engage actions! Hover can be used to show subtle graphical cues like highlighting a button to show that it's possible to interact with it, or to show a tool tip. Users can get frustrated if actions are engaged just by hovering since it's not a standard way of doing it. And (as stated in the comments) - hover doesn't exists in ...


9

The default Windows cursor (white with black outline) uses the red pixel as its hotspot. The default Mac cursor (black with white outline) uses the topmost pixel of the black arrow as its hotspot. Two down, and one to the right of the red pixel. As far as user intentions go, they are going to expect the cursor to act the same everywhere and not suddenly ...


8

The button or link should already speak for itself. I'm surprised this hasn't been mentioned before, but why not omit the word entirely? The link or button should already indicate it is interactive, so the content should represent the action to perform when clicked or tapped. For example, instead of saying "Click to send me an email," or "Tap to check out,"...


8

Do users prefer to drag and drop or click to add? One thing to consider is that drag-and-drop can be difficult with a laptop touchpad. If click-to-add can be used without an additional drag step, you'll likely make some laptop users happier. This also applies for touchscreens, where dragging might be confused with an attempt at scrolling. Modern touch-...


7

I would also click on the title, it's the area of greatest visual importance as it's currently displayed on the page. The three most visually relevant points are the picture, the title, and the orange button. The orange button has an immediate action well described on the button label, so this click action is relegated, leaving only the title and the image ...


6

Great answers here! I'm developing a card game using Python and Pygame, which has no double-click support, so I stumbled upon the same problem. Inspired on Marcel Böttcher's answer, to measure your own time and then double it, I've created a small tool to measure the speed of double-clicks, and I'm sharing with you: import pygame import random pygame.init(...


6

From my first impressions (as a standard user), it's not immediately clear to me that these boxes are clickable. I think a button would serve you well here, like so: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


6

I suggest just pulling all of the functionality into the popover and using actual buttons to add or subtract points. You can use a single click/tap on the node to open the popover and a single click/tap to close it (you can also add an 'X' or clickout to close). Using buttons to manage the points provides you with the exact same functionality between mobile ...


6

I often click titles like this in e-shops due to two connected reasons: The description of the item is too short. Especially if nature of the item is expected to be understood by certain properties, I would expect it to have required information and multiple images present. • Example leading to clicking anywhere: ear buds for smartphone - color: white - ...


6

There is also the too-prevalent issue of things flying around the screen while the page is loading. Maybe they were trying to click the add to cart button but the page shifted underneath them?


6

This is sometimes referred to as 'excise'. Alan Cooper in the classic software guide About Face refers to the larger term Excise whenever you have extra decorations, extra interactions, and the like: This could be classified as visual excise: (page 226) Visual excise is the work that a user has to do to decode visual information, such as finding a single ...


5

Don't think about it as tapping on the ON part or OFF part of the switch, think of it as one single switch. Since it is a toggle, tapping or clicking on any part of the toggle switch should change the status. The important thing here is to clearly display the current state using word or color so user will know, at a glance, the state of the setting. ...


5

It depends, click to add and drag and drop will have the same outcomes with slightly different processes. If I click to add, then the expectation is that I've chosen something specific. The pro of this approach is going to be that specificity: "I want this put into that bucket." When that is the logical outcome of my effort, a click to add makes perfect ...


5

You don't want to prevent your users from closing multiple modals rapidly, every approach in this direction will be a fail. What you want to do is preventing your user to close any tab by mistake. As it is a mistake use case, do not design for it from the beginning (except if it does not disturb any 'normal' use case). Rather than doing that, just add the ...


5

Chevrons Users are familiar with chevrons at the end of list items. They know that on click it takes them to a deeper page. You could also add a width difference to the '12 Novelties' card to show that it comes under 'Leather'


5

Due to the limited control possibilities on the mobile device, it will always be the case that there will be an unnecessary extra step for the desktop user if the behaviour absolutely must be the same. I'd suggest you to give up on this limitation. On mobile, something called "force touch" typically work as the right click alternative. You can do the ...


4

Use hover, but don't make your UI depend on it as: it doesn't work on touch devices if used to reveal actions, those actions are effectively hidden away from the user hover is not accessible to all users (it requires patience; ability to exactly position the mouse) it's totally uncommon to activate items on hover, no matter how convenient that may seem --...


4

Yes, the entire container should be clickable, not just the call to action text/button. On my e-commerce site, all ADs, promotions, and even grid SKUs on product listing page are entirely clicable. This, we've found, is easier for users to navigate because they won't have to pin point the exact link or button. Unless you have multiple actionable elements ...


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