Hot answers tagged

85

Spell it out to the user. You don't want to leave them guessing so I would recommend you add a simple addition to your UI. Note the change of language in the search box. By saying choose location you are more or less saying "do it here", whereby now it is clear it is just one of two options.


64

If you feel like jumping the action (click/tap) you can directly say "Select" the ... Rather than a generic word, I would suggest you try to check what device the person is using and then say "click/tap" appropriate for the platform. But, then come the devices with both, a peripheral device and touch capability, which make this situation awkward-ish. You ...


54

Remove the drop-shadow, and make the button an icon instead. This flattening basically renders the whole tile as a single seamless unit, and users would quickly discover that touching the icon has the same effect as touching anywhere else on the item box. Also, if your target device is non-touch, you could highlight the entire box on hover rather than just ...


51

Just to think outside the box I've decided to paste a radical suggestion to this, as I have called it "map-tap" problem :) Imagine if a low opacity touch gesture image appeared over the map either for a few seconds and then disappear or it would stay there, lingering like a ghost, hinting to the user what to do. When a user taps the map it would disappear. ...


38

I vote "yes"! True, hover events shouldn't be depended upon because touch devices are so popular. However, Jon seems to be asking about visual hover states on buttons, which is slightly different. Visual hover states afford "clickablity". You shouldn't have to click something to find out if it's a button. Users on laptops and desktops expect "clickable" ...


35

Select or Press Just thinking about it from the perspective of the item. It will be selected/pressed by either the user's finger or the mouse cursor. Either of those work.


35

Good question. I can only offer my opinion, no research. In my opinion, it seems as though doing this is mixing 2 separate actions on one element (I've done it myself in the past). I've come to the conclusion that the navigation click action on the "Services" item should be removed. You will face further problems when people use touch screens. E.g. when ...


26

Double-click Checkboxes are … … one of the most terrible ideas i've heard about in a while. Users expect a checkbox to be single-click. Period. There is no problem with accidently clicking checkboxes: Actions triggered by checkboxes should be instantly reversible per se. Thus, miss-clicking should be a non-issue, since a simple second click will restore ...


23

Windows default double-click time is 500 ms (half a second) Reference http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/bb760404(v=vs.85).aspx


23

As I've learnt – the more options you provide for the same actions – the better the application is. So the advice would be to implement both drag-n-drop and click-to-add, and you don’t have to worry about which one users use. Even better, you have the option to track which one is most popular in your specific case, which may differ from an existing more ...


21

Instead of double clicking to finish, you could: Click the starting point to close the shape (assuming all shapes are closed in) Have a button nearby labeled "Finished" or "Close Shape" or "I'm Done" etc. that closes the shape If you aren't able to use the OS to detect double clicks, I'd avoid them altogether. I've seen people with disabilities have the ...


21

You could de-emphasize the search field, e.g. by not showing it by default. Just say "Choose a location" in the head of the screen, and have a magnifying glass button that pops up the search field for people who want to enter an address. Something like this: Even if you don't go with this approach, you might want to adjust your text sizes and wording. "...


20

Some of the standard cues: Hover state: Make the calendar icon transform when the user hovers it, maybe having the calendar show a grid representing a month on hover. Contextual text: Write Show month or similar as a link adjacent to the calendar. Mimic button: Add borders to the icon which makes it appear as a button.


19

Number of clicks are much less important than users feeling that they are getting closer to their goal. The key points are: Navigation should get the user where they need to go, with clear, well-defined paths and decision points Information should be organised into distinct areas with clear themes Users should at all times know where they are, and what they ...


19

Have you considered moving the map, rather than moving the "pin"? Scrolling a map is a common action in most map applications, if you keep the reticule static and move the map underneath it, the user can target their desired position. The text in the box should update as the user scrolls. This might allow you to get away with no additional help messaging. ...


18

The simplest questions often have complex answers. If you’re making a game, it sounds like you may be making a custom interface, so you probably need some general principles to guide your control design. Whether to trigger an action on mouse down or mouse up depends on the control and the action and how the user will interact with it. This is probably why ...


18

Awesh has given a great link which should provide you with sufficient material to make your case. I would also recommend researching for research studies which show that the scrolling in websites is no longer a factor and users to do scroll to the end of a page and the concept of "above the fold" came from print design where the focus was getting the most ...


14

I try to avoid hover states in design as much as possible. The primary reason for that is that they are meaningless on touch devices. While this may seem like it doesn't apply when you aren't designing for mobile, many people use their tablets or other touch devices to browse the same websites or use the same applications that you would traditionally only ...


14

You buttons should always say what they do. Avoid vague terms and, most especially, do not confuse the user by having a single button do two things! Also, giving the user two text fields can cause issue - if I only type something into the second box, what happens? UX Movement has an article on naming buttons: Why Your Form Buttons Should Never Say 'Submit'. ...


12

Press (you either press the mouse button to click on a link, or you directly press the display if it's a touch device)


12

Disclaimer: I am not a UX expert Cursors, Et. Al. My thesis is that you should indicate a clickable area in other ways -- don't use dummy buttons. My approach is to change the cursor to indicate something clickable. That, obviously, doesn't work for touch-based devices. Other answers here have provided some excellent ideas for visual design-based ...


12

Since users are likely to see the entry form first, how about using the placeholder text for this? "Enter location or just pick from map ..."


11

You're not showing the whole context so we can't see how the icon you show fits in to the context of the page. However, it will help if you make the 'thing' a self contained actionable item - most usually in the form of a button (whatever style suits your theme) and also add a call to action (eg show calendar) or a label (Calendar). For more information on ...


11

I actually think your current design actually works pretty well: the green + sign indicates that there's something interactive there (and the general nature of the action), and while it also does mark the sign itself as the key interactive element, one would naturally expect the actual trigger area of the + button to extend beyond its visible borders, ...


10

I also had no idea this was an option until trying it just now! But now that I know, I won't forget. I believe this is an example of progressive disclosure, or at least introducing progressive complexity in the available interactions. It is a shortcut feature for expert users (or at least those knowledgeable about this particular interaction), but does not ...


10

In general - don't use hover to engage actions! Hover can be used to show subtle graphical cues like highlighting a button to show that it's possible to interact with it, or to show a tool tip. Users can get frustrated if actions are engaged just by hovering since it's not a standard way of doing it. And (as stated in the comments) - hover doesn't exists in ...


9

It seems to me there are two issues here; what is a click? and Should I use a click? What is a Click? In the strictest sense a click is an extremely brief (<100ms) press of the left mouse key, or more generally the analogous control such as a tap on a touch screen. Ideally the mouse does not move at all during a click event; no more than ordinary hand ...


9

The default Windows cursor (white with black outline) uses the red pixel as its hotspot. The default Mac cursor (black with white outline) uses the topmost pixel of the black arrow as its hotspot. Two down, and one to the right of the red pixel. As far as user intentions go, they are going to expect the cursor to act the same everywhere and not suddenly ...


8

Silly comments I'm a Spanish speaker, and this question comes from a prestigious member wearing the "GB" letters in his name, so I'm intimidated. But anyway ... In Spanish, quite informally almost humorously, I use the verb picar that means to peck. Mouse pointers and fingers behave like birds while eating. Now I realize that this silly word pictures both ...


8

More obvious option is combining price and add button.


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