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19

It has been discussed in the google forums but it seems that there isn't any clue about it. The only theory I can imagine of is related to the situation when someone starts googling about an specific topic and opens a lot of tabs (which will be opened on the right), then when navigating, the result might be found in the first previously open tabs, so you ...


13

Don't inform them. Provided it works fine on all browers and doesn't look a huge mess in IE8 (see 'Graceful Degradation') then why bother telling users to update their browser? The chances are if they're using an old browser it's because they don't have a choice - it could be a corporate network where they don't have permission / ability to update, for ...


10

I could think of two reasons a link to Mozilla, which wouldn't make much sense, if you ask me you're offline, you dinosaur!


7

As a matter of fact I'm quite sure that between the wrench and the kebab icon there was a hamburger. Either way, the most likely reason for the icon is consistency . This kebab menu icon is the same they're using in Material Design, so they're basically following their own guidelines, see Menus section in MD A menu is a temporary piece of material that ...


5

I don't see this as a dark pattern at all. I haven't done any testing on this, but I've never been the slightest confused about that. The opt in is directly related to the TOS, and this seems to be a good place to put it.


4

I agree with @rewobs about the first tabs often being more important. It's not just a common observation, but actually a very reasonable occurrence, because new tabs open on the right. So if I open my "main" item (my inbox, my facebook feed, an article), and then it leads me to open a bunch of secondary items (through links in the original), the secondary ...


3

I agree with both previous answer but they've missed one pretty important point > Locked Tabs are always staying most to left. If you'd have a possibility to close tabs to the left you'd just simply always close your Pinned/Locked Tabs – which you for sure don't want to. IMHO that's the main reason – personally I'm using locked tabs for most important ...


3

Over the years, things have changed somewhat. Chrome has changed its menu icon to three vertical dots to comply with the Material Design HIG: Apple has changed its drag-and-drop icon to be visually distinct from the hamburger: Though the hamburger icon still isn't used consistently (e.g. Firefox and Gnome use it as a generic menu icon), both Microsoft and ...


3

I'm taking a wild guess, since it's very hard to find out "why" on anything Google does. However, I think the choice is more useful since it supports how we use the web today. Back in the days (early 1990s) when the web was static, it was simple and easy to look at the history to find out where you were last. Today that's a different story. We use rich web ...


2

If it's not a dark pattern, it's pretty close. I call shenanigans on it. Obviously they are attempting to increase enrollment by leveraging the rote pattern of clicking the checkbox and submitting the ToS form. They are relying on the universal fact that no one reads any of this stuff. Sneaky. If they wanted to be on the level. They should put that statement ...


2

In my opinion, this is not a dark practice. It doesn't fall into the user experience category nearly as much as it lends itself to user rights (or something similar). This is standard practice by many software companies, Microsoft, Apple, Yahoo!, Blackberry, etc. The "dark"-ness depends on the purpose of the interaction. The user data and feedback that ...


2

I agree that the three-lines icon is being established as a place to pull something. (See in particular the lined tab that appears if you drag down from the top of an iOS screen to show notifications, or on the lock screen when multiple notifications are waiting, or on the camera icon on the lock screen.) Matching that icon to the real world examples of the ...


2

From a user perspective I think it would be better to default to off for this, the new tab on update could then ask if the user wanted to enable it, the tone of this question is very important: Hi my name is x and I developed this extension, enabling y setting would help support me to support/improve the extension as well as donate to charity. I am ...


2

Trying to overcome visual changes applied on top of your design by the browser or any number of addons is a cat and mouse game that you will likely never win. I'd therefore recommend to not attempt to control it, and just let it do whatever it does. If you think about the user's perspective on this, they are used to every website/app they go to having ...


2

Depends on the application that you are designing. If there is only one page OR there is only a flat hierarchy (Inbox, Trash bin, Settings) OR users are unlikely to go back in a set of steps then you probably don't need it. Also, android provides a back button natively. For iOS you still have to add it. Maybe something like this?


1

In the HTML, label the email field "username", both name and ID attributes. Use "Email" as the label that the user sees. They will be setting a login that is an email. Don't capture a separate username, as that might be confusing ("Which do I log in with?") Use Display Name as a handle that will be used throughout the site.


1

It’s referring to an HTML label tag. <label for=“answer”>Answer</label> <input id=“answer”> This is the “right” way to mark up a label for a form field. aria-labelledby is a work-around when the label can’t be marked up by a label tag (e.g. see this recent answer) aria-label is an alternative when for whatever reason there isn’t a tag ...


1

At the moment, I'm seeing (virtually) identical designs on Chrome and Safari. Chances are they may just be running split-tests and you happen to get that version in one browser and not the others (cookies are not persistent across browsers).


1

For what I compile out of your post, some of your requirements... Some remarks: Think before you start working out the idea, what you want it to do; What are logical steps in the process to achieve the task? Make it fail proof... A few pointers what I think of: When using a notification, it's not going to stay for minutes I assume, merely a matter of ...


1

Notification seems like the most obvious solution. It's large, in your face, and will have minimal confusion. The others could be confused with the actions of other extensions, not the best UX.


1

Let's find out. Here's a paragraph from French Wikipedia: Wikipédia est un projet d’encyclopédie collective établie sur Internet, universelle, multilingue et fonctionnant sur le principe du wiki. Wikipédia a pour objectif d’offrir un contenu librement réutilisable, objectif et vérifiable, que chacun peut modifier et améliorer. Here's Google's translation ...


1

It's not distracting, it's helpful. Every usability test I have seen shows increase in task completion and finding your choice. Here is a good article about the patterns for different uses. http://baymard.com/blog/autocomplete-design


1

This notification shows accesses that will be granted. It is security important. So I think negative action is highlighted to ensure that user makes his choise after looking at permissions. And maybe other reason is that it also could be pressed by keyboard, accidentally, with Enter key. In this case nothing wrong will happen, app with dangerous ...


1

If you are going to prompt the user to do anything, you should consider what the user is doing when you are prompting them, and why you are prompting them. Prompts should occur in the right context and help the user achieve their goal. In this particular case, "might enhance [their] experience" is an insufficient reason to stop the user from doing what ...


1

This question is likely to have subjective answers so I thought I'd throw my hat in My (hiccup Uneducated) Opinion Yes, you should ask the user if he would like to again But only if he shows real engagement with the site and goes to it regularly. It should always be an option for him to do add it in the settings Similarities Adding a homescreen file ...


1

IMHO, it's the right way to do it. See, at first I agreed with you, until I realized you're not seeing an error message, but technical description on an error message, which is an absolutely different thing. The error message itself is short, clearly represented by iconography and header and a very short text that describes the problem. Then they have a ...


1

Without context for the application, we can mostly guess as to the why the 'close' button is there. On most desktop applications/browsers the 'X' is always used as a close button. Be it Windows/OSX/Linux. Since you're filling a form, I am not sure why it would allow you to close a part of the form, especially since refreshing will just make the item ...


1

Keyboard Shortcut navigation is not a new phenomena, but its efficiency is questionable. Because keyboard shortcuts have the same problem as command line tools; there are no visual clues of what you can do. You have to fill your mind with irrelevant information of keyboard shortcut navigation until the day when you have placed the patterns in your muscle ...


1

If your extension is solving a problem and has many users, you could consider integrating a Flattr button in your interface. It's growing more and more popular, and I think that by being a "recurring" donation system, you get more than from a normal Paypal donation. You could try it at least, no one will get upset that you have a button for donation in there....


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