Hot answers tagged

83

Etsy spent quite some time developing and testing infinite scroll in their search listings. They noticed fewer clicks on results and fewer items favourited from the infinite results page, and users stopped using the search interface to find products. They reverted back to traditional pagination. There's a good article about it here: http://danwin.com/2013/01/...


43

Guidelines The Apple OSX Human Interface Guidelines (2012) recommend a drop down if you have more than 5 options, while the Microsoft Windows 10 User Experience Guidelines recommend a drop down if you have more than 8 options. So, take the average and stay with radio buttons if you less than 6.5 options (shrug). You’re near the borderline (at least for one ...


31

Booking.com experimented with it, conversion dropped immensely. Everything they do there is A/B-tested. I wish I could share statistics, but those are documented internally so you'll just have to take this anecdotal evidence for what it is: something a guy on the internet posted. That said, the reason no large e-commerce websites use it means that it doesn'...


23

An example of this claim can be found in Smashing UX Design: Foundations for Designing Online User Experiences - page 300, point 2. It says that an odd number of products: can be easier to scan, makes the choice easier to make, keeps the eye moving across a row because the items cannot be grouped easily. It suggests that this might be backed up by the "...


18

In the original GUI guidelines from the Lisa/Macintosh, Xerox Star, and Microsoft Windows, check boxes are, as the name implies, something you can mark (with a check-mark) if you wish to select or mark it - or clear if you wish to deselect it. Each checkbox choice is independent of each other, in terms of their activation. Radio buttons, on the other hand, ...


15

You don't need the double asterisk if you can group related fields together and label them (example: "Contact Information") and then place the asterisk by the label "Contact Information." (you can add "Select one of the following" below) Here's a rule-of-thumb: if you have to explain too much it's too complicated.


14

Yes, there is a convention: checkboxes = option for multiple choices radio-buttons = only one single choice among the options


9

According to Checkboxes vs. Radio Buttons (Nielsen, 2004): If possible, use radio buttons rather than drop-down menus. Radio buttons have lower cognitive load because they make all options permanently visible so that users can easily compare them. Radio buttons are also easier to operate for users who have difficulty making precise mouse movements....


9

I'd be in favour of a separate option. If the user selects fixed markup, Price markup: fixed | percentage Markup amount: $[_______] If percentage markup is selected: Price markup: fixed | percentage Markup percentage: [_______]% This should make it a bit clearer to the users what is going on, even if it makes the form a bit longer. (Also, be sure that ...


8

Looking at the convention you should have the most popular option on top. The user is used to scanning a list this way, from top to bottom, no matter how the list came to be. Taken from Google Chrome: Collapsed Expanded The upper alternative is Open, which would be the most utilized in this case.


8

Try saving the icons for the results, and use visual distinction to show their selection. You can separate the result and feedback right below the choices (with their selection). The feedback can use 2 levels of visual distinction: color and icon. For incorrect answers, show them the correct answer in close proximity to the feedback.


7

In this situation, you're correct to reject the 7+/- approach. Really, the answer is that too much choice results in no decision being made. This is a variety on the Analysis Paralysis. Analysis Paralysis refers to over-analyzing (or over-thinking) a situation, or citing sources, so that a decision or action is never taken, in effect paralyzing the ...


7

The confusion isn't coming from the color of the double asterisk, it's the double asterisk itself that isn't intuitive. I've always believed if you need a legend to detail what your page is saying to users then you're saying it wrong. Instead I would give each field set a header such as Contact Info, Parents Contact Info, etc. then say "Choose one" and put ...


7

What about a drop-down a.k.a combobox? download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups There can be as many options as you like (it is dynamically sized), if the options don't fit in the screen, you get a scrollbar, and after selecting an option the user immediately sees their choice. Edit after OP's edit You can still have it one ...


6

To address your specific concern: Since there is no confirmation it feels odd…. Radio buttons are usually used when you can change your selection before confirming. The solution is to use command buttons for each status, not radio buttons. Users are more likely to expect that clicking a command button will execute an action and close the dialog. However,...


5

In a comment you say you're asking for male/female simply so you can address them correctly. I interpret that to mean you're corresponding with them as "Dear Mr Lastname" or "Dear Ms Lastname." So you could ask for that specific information. Here in the US we sometimes see registration forms asking users to choose "Mr" or "Ms" as a title, though these days ...


5

"On the computer, go to the employee website. Click the button that best describes you and the computer you're using:" On screen:


4

Here's my take on your second question. Long story short, it is naturally simpler to "divide & conquer" an odd group: In an odd grouping, the center item likely becomes the natural focal point, and so you'll get a mental image of that item in your mind as you look at it. Next, your eye will likely gravitate to one of the side groups to compare your ...


4

As a user, I hate running into limits after I've invested time. For example, say I've uploaded 50 pictures thinking I can make a slide show with all 50 pictures. If there is a limit of 10 slides, and I don't discover this limit until I go to add the 10th or 11th slide, I'm gonna be unhappy. So, my first suggestion is to indicate from the beginning what the ...


3

Personally, I like the way then there is a default (most visited) version of the site is shown and there is an ability to switch to another (less visited) version if needed (with "save my choice for future visits" action). It could be done like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups It's better because most of the ...


3

Allow the user to set his own default snooze time and so that can be customized so that he can set when he wants to be reminded.What might seem like an optimal snooze time for you might not be for others. For example, I like to set my alarm snooze time as 10 minutes though for my reminder apps I set it as one hour as I know that if I cannot attend the ...


3

I'd advise against using the current concept. It's clever, but it should be obvious. Additionally, if you're assuming that it'll be used on both desktop and mobile, the way that users interact with it will be inconsistent. Finally, redefining a very common pattern (pinch & spread) for something other than zooming in & out is going to necessitate a ...


3

Infinite scrolling is generally bad for eCommerce sites because it doesn't allow users to bookmark pages or save where they left off if they leave and come back. Basically, if the user leaves the site, they lose their progress and it's hard for customers to know if they are getting the best product because they don't know for sure whether they've seen all ...


3

It looks fine to me, I believe the terminology "we host a version for you" isn't great, perhaps:


3

Sounds like you're building a system that only lets them enter one method of contact. That's not optimal. One contact type should be the minimum, not the maximum. What DasBeasto says (plus some comments on his answer) is a long way in the right direction, but not quite there. Using the asterisk on a section instead of a field should be clear enough, but I ...


3

I have answered a similar question before. https://ux.stackexchange.com/a/85487/57766 If this data is crucial, and you have to ask, use "Gender". Biological sex is too sensitive as a subject and you might steer some of the TA away if you use it.


3

If you're going to do this as text instructions, be fully grammatical about it. Here's how I'd revise your text: Visit the course-management site: http://example.com Pick the appropriate option, depending upon the type of computer you're using: If you're using your own work computer, click My Work Computer. If you're using a shared computer, click ...


3

Well, I don’t see any buttons at all, which is a good thing, you only need one or two buttons for this. Of course, if you have buttons and they don’t even look like buttons, then you have real problems. But I assume you don’t mean buttons and it’s just a translation issue Anyways, if you’re building a form to gather user’s opinions, just keep it simple. Get ...


3

Had a similar case and used a text input field with an icon that enabled the user to choose a date by selection, with a set of predefined options (the most common sorting time frames for that use case). It works really well here, our users are tech-savvy and they had no problems to use this pattern.


2

There can be only one gold, one silver, and one bronze user, and they obviously can't be the same person. Radio buttons, being the standard 'there can be only one' control is the obvious choice. First, you can't 'Turn off' a radio button. In the case of accidentally choose a 'Gold' winner, a set of radio buttons provides no clear way to give the input of '...


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