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43

Guidelines The Apple OSX Human Interface Guidelines (2012) recommend a drop down if you have more than 5 options, while the Microsoft Windows 10 User Experience Guidelines recommend a drop down if you have more than 8 options. So, take the average and stay with radio buttons if you less than 6.5 options (shrug). You’re near the borderline (at least for one ...


16

You don't need the double asterisk if you can group related fields together and label them (example: "Contact Information") and then place the asterisk by the label "Contact Information." (you can add "Select one of the following" below) Here's a rule-of-thumb: if you have to explain too much it's too complicated.


9

The confusion isn't coming from the color of the double asterisk, it's the double asterisk itself that isn't intuitive. I've always believed if you need a legend to detail what your page is saying to users then you're saying it wrong. Instead I would give each field set a header such as Contact Info, Parents Contact Info, etc. then say "Choose one" and put ...


9

According to Checkboxes vs. Radio Buttons (Nielsen, 2004): If possible, use radio buttons rather than drop-down menus. Radio buttons have lower cognitive load because they make all options permanently visible so that users can easily compare them. Radio buttons are also easier to operate for users who have difficulty making precise mouse movements....


9

I'd be in favour of a separate option. If the user selects fixed markup, Price markup: fixed | percentage Markup amount: $[_______] If percentage markup is selected: Price markup: fixed | percentage Markup percentage: [_______]% This should make it a bit clearer to the users what is going on, even if it makes the form a bit longer. (Also, be sure that ...


8

Try saving the icons for the results, and use visual distinction to show their selection. You can separate the result and feedback right below the choices (with their selection). The feedback can use 2 levels of visual distinction: color and icon. For incorrect answers, show them the correct answer in close proximity to the feedback.


7

What about a drop-down a.k.a combobox? download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups There can be as many options as you like (it is dynamically sized), if the options don't fit in the screen, you get a scrollbar, and after selecting an option the user immediately sees their choice. Edit after OP's edit You can still have it one ...


6

In a comment you say you're asking for male/female simply so you can address them correctly. I interpret that to mean you're corresponding with them as "Dear Mr Lastname" or "Dear Ms Lastname." So you could ask for that specific information. Here in the US we sometimes see registration forms asking users to choose "Mr" or "Ms" as a title, though these days ...


6

To address your specific concern: Since there is no confirmation it feels odd…. Radio buttons are usually used when you can change your selection before confirming. The solution is to use command buttons for each status, not radio buttons. Users are more likely to expect that clicking a command button will execute an action and close the dialog. However,...


5

"On the computer, go to the employee website. Click the button that best describes you and the computer you're using:" On screen:


4

As a user, I hate running into limits after I've invested time. For example, say I've uploaded 50 pictures thinking I can make a slide show with all 50 pictures. If there is a limit of 10 slides, and I don't discover this limit until I go to add the 10th or 11th slide, I'm gonna be unhappy. So, my first suggestion is to indicate from the beginning what the ...


4

Did you do any usability comparison testing with actual users? It's quite helpful AFAIK. Have you ever seen any website or app with the interface you propose? Infinite scroll (or sometimes pagination with long pages) is much more common (and better IMO) simply because it gives the users more flexibility.


4

The rule that radio buttons require a single selection applies to a list of radio buttons, not the whole form. Your form has multiple lists (some as short as two items), so each list is a group of mutually exclusive radio buttons. Within each group of radio buttons, the user can only choose one. When the form is completed, multiple radio buttons are selected ...


3

I have answered a similar question before. https://ux.stackexchange.com/a/85487/57766 If this data is crucial, and you have to ask, use "Gender". Biological sex is too sensitive as a subject and you might steer some of the TA away if you use it.


3

Sounds like you're building a system that only lets them enter one method of contact. That's not optimal. One contact type should be the minimum, not the maximum. What DasBeasto says (plus some comments on his answer) is a long way in the right direction, but not quite there. Using the asterisk on a section instead of a field should be clear enough, but I ...


3

It looks fine to me, I believe the terminology "we host a version for you" isn't great, perhaps:


3

Personally, I like the way then there is a default (most visited) version of the site is shown and there is an ability to switch to another (less visited) version if needed (with "save my choice for future visits" action). It could be done like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups It's better because most of the ...


3

I'd advise against using the current concept. It's clever, but it should be obvious. Additionally, if you're assuming that it'll be used on both desktop and mobile, the way that users interact with it will be inconsistent. Finally, redefining a very common pattern (pinch & spread) for something other than zooming in & out is going to necessitate a ...


3

If you're going to do this as text instructions, be fully grammatical about it. Here's how I'd revise your text: Visit the course-management site: http://example.com Pick the appropriate option, depending upon the type of computer you're using: If you're using your own work computer, click My Work Computer. If you're using a shared computer, click ...


3

Well, I don’t see any buttons at all, which is a good thing, you only need one or two buttons for this. Of course, if you have buttons and they don’t even look like buttons, then you have real problems. But I assume you don’t mean buttons and it’s just a translation issue Anyways, if you’re building a form to gather user’s opinions, just keep it simple. Get ...


3

Had a similar case and used a text input field with an icon that enabled the user to choose a date by selection, with a set of predefined options (the most common sorting time frames for that use case). It works really well here, our users are tech-savvy and they had no problems to use this pattern.


3

I would go with the checkboxes. The issue you'll run into, from what I can see in your list, is going with the Choice Chip option will create really long Chips. That is if you're going to be placing the copy verbatim. Also, it states under the usage guidelines that the chips are meant for "...single selection from a set of options." The chips work best for ...


2

As I see it there are two main flow strategies to choose from, and interestingly two of the large players have implemented one each: Facebook has one call to action from the news feed, namely "Photo". When a user goes into that flow they are initially presented with their album to make a selection. To capture a new photo there is a CTA to the ...


2

Disable the non-active combobox. Leave it visible, but grayed out, so that only the selected one is interactive. But can I ask why it's split into radio buttons with comboboxes? What kind of options is the user actually picking here?


2

Clever. Simple. Unbiased Design. Here are some of the things to watch out for: Customer's confidence. Set the tone in a way that both products / services are equal, otherwise customers might assume the company's focus is more on A and B would soon cease to exist. So letting the insurance site use the main URL is a big no in my book. The main URL should ...


2

Here's my possible solution... Options to the right that give all the choices (since you mentioned they must all be visible). I think you said they used to be radio buttons, which implies only one option at a time can be chosen. Make a subheader above these radio buttons, something like Form Type. This section to the right may or may not have "sticky" ...


2

I'm going to go ahead and answer myself with a possible solution. Maybe we don't want to show all options? It's likely that many types are not that popular for some reason, so we could show the most popular types in the front row, or maybe the ones used most recentely.


2

Never rely on colour alone to convey meaning as this will cause problems for users with varying types of colour blindness.


2

Basically the number of choices given to the users should not be too many. How much depends on what the product is and what are the suggested products. Since, here its food, the lesser number of choices the more likely that people would actually make a choice. Sheena Iyengars famous jam choice experiment talks about choice overload. " At a luxury food ...


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