3

If you have to get users to create an account when they check out then I would recommend: reducing the data needed to create an account to a minimum (email and password) being honest about it So first screen you can set the scene # You must create an account first You have to create an account because of x and y. [Continue] Then the next screen can be ...


3

I would be more explicit with the 11/31 calculation. I would also separate the numbers from the explanation in the calculation to make it more easily readable.


2

Short answer Grey out is probably better than hiding, but only doing the one or the other is not going to solve the customer problem. Why are customers confused? Customers usually have preferred payment and delivery methods. They don't like if a shop doesn't offer their preferred methods (but still might want to buy). What confuses them is if a method is ...


2

I can't really imagine many users will have more than 5 active addresses though as with any user data, the user always knows best. I would do the following and allow the user to store as many as they need: Allow the user to set a primary address which is used as the default. Offer to save any other addresses the user uses on checkout. At checkout display ...


2

I just went through this experience as a customer. I unwittingly made a donation to a veteran's charity because the donation was set up opt-out at checkout. Even though the charity appears to be legit (upon doing some research after the fact), the experience makes you feel like you've been duped. An email to the business was followed by tremendous ...


1

Are bad UX and legitimate policy mutually exclusive? From a user standpoint I consider it part mildly frustrating and part extra typing practice, lol. I know it bothers others a good deal more than me but considering it's a one time* "nuisance" that takes only ~2-10 seconds I wouldn't even be thinking "bad UX" if you didn't use that term. Reactions will vary;...


1

A big part of users' concerns about creating an account has to do with the overhead, related to this. I'd consider all the additional data that you're collecting for registration that is not part of doing a checkout. Unless you have some other objectives in mind (and I would question whether it is reasonable to combine two different objectives in a single ...


1

Your lead question specifically asks if cancellation is a success or an error. It's neither one. Cancellation is simply something you should notify the user of in a neutral way. I didn't see it at first, but way at the bottom you mentioned there is a neutral "notice" option. It is the one you should use. With that, here are the 3 types of ...


1

I would suggest that you provide the user with a more specific explanation of how you are calculating the costs. Don't just rely on a simple table of values. For example, add some information before the cost breakdown: The price at checkout is calculated on a pro-rata basis for the remaining days in this month. You will initially pay $1.41 per mobile device ...


1

If the donation method needs explanation, maybe you have to consider one that doesn't. If it's not avoidable, then the user might be given a choice between showing and hiding the payment instruction.


1

I think collecting online donations should be easy, affordable and transparent. Showing payment-related FAQ/instructions at the end of the page will make sense.


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