77

Render the confirmation in a modal: This will highlight explicitly to the user that one more action is needed.


60

For me personally I would go with case B: When you are prompted for shipping address I think users immediately know the answer (where I want my goods to be delivered). It's a simple answer. However, in the case of billing address users can be hesitant (makes them think), but if they have already inputted the shipping address it will be easier for them to ...


50

As a user I would expect to fill my shipping address first because I might need to check whether the seller ships to that particular location. Then if it ships I might enter billing address. Some checkout processes are divided on multiple pages. It seems more logical to put the shipping address before billing address, in order to check if shipping is ...


21

I don't like the words Submit Request - as a designer that is what pressing the button does. For a user, it is more-or-less as meaningless as Press This Button. I don't think Send Request is much better, possibly worse (where is the request going to be sent to?). I suggest Place Booking if that is what your system is about: booking a course somewhere. ...


20

YES, but.... In fact, you don't need to delete the promo code itself, but the association to the product. However, it's always good to delete the promo code as well, for the reasons below: Make your user's life easier You're building this for an user, and you're building an usability paradigm, thus this paradigm has to keep the user in mind. One of the ...


17

TL;DR: Use a single text field, store as a single string, show an address label preview. Separate fields have served limited purpose, such as safely identifying the country, town or zip code area someone lives in. They also allowed to enforce some constraints, such as providing a fixed list of countries. They also - in theory - allowed to "reduce the number ...


15

I'm for Case B. Right when the user goes to checkout, they will want to: See if that item ships to their location Check shipping costs associated with their location Since billing information is directly related to payment for the order, it should be near the end. The checkout process should be grouped into something like: Shipping > Shipping Costs > ...


15

Whether it is good or bad will depend exclusively on your specific scenario and user testing. However, this is a very common pattern, it's called Progressive Disclosure. In general, Progressive Disclosure is a great tool to IMPROVE conversions. However, if users find a "surprise", they will probably abandon the flow. IN short: go for it. But as ...


14

Your shipping and billing information is pretty crucial to the process of placing an order. If it's incorrect, your order will be misdelivered (not cool) or you won't be able to charge the customer correctly for the order. Like any input that has such huge consequences for a software process, it is good UX to allow the user to review this essential ...


14

Placeholders gone terribly wrong tl;dr When a placeholder doesn't clarify anything, it shouldn't be there. This is a great example of the negative impact of placeholder text pointed out by NN/g quite some time ago. Summary: Placeholder text within a form field makes it difficult for people to remember what information belongs in a field, and to check ...


13

Change the behavior to fit the intuition You might want to change the behavior to fit the user intuition, instead of changing the design to "make the user understand" the behavior that you originally intended. If there are no major reasons for the details to be set in stone at that point (and they aren't, since apparently they can cancel it before the ...


11

The right choice might depend on your user base. If it mostly consists of private residential customers, it is likely that they will not need to make any difference between both addresses and that their main concern will be the shipping address. If it is mainly made of business customers, things can be different for at least two reasons : the billing ...


10

I would suggest hiding it if there are no valid coupons which can be applied to it. As per this article, 27 % of users abandoned carts to go search for a coupon codes and if there are no valid coupon codes available, there is a possibility you might lose your users as they might not return. That said, you can use that space to get people to sign up ...


9

You should really change the wording on your primary action buttons to make it absolutely clear. "Submitting request" or "Send request" is what your browser does when the user clicks a link or button, but "Pay for session" is what the user wants or has to do in this context to continue. By using a modal dialog you show the user that he has to complete the ...


8

For starters, I strongly recommend not requiring users to not create an account before completing an eCommerce purchase as that just puts another step in their way to doing the cart checkout and can lead to cart abandonment. To quote this article Customers dislike having to register for yet another account. This quickly became evident during our testing ...


8

One of the main reasons might be that a lot of companies use the Address Verification System to match the entered address against the cardholder's address (assuming a Credit/Debit Card payment takes place). In this case you'll need the billing address. So this is the address you need anyway - and in a lot of cases the billing address will match the shipping ...


7

As Luke Wroblewski points out in "Web Form Design", the size of of an input field can help provide your form fields with affordance. The way you've adjusted the field lengths in the billing and shipping sections are good because they provide the user with an idea of what they're expected to enter. It would be a good idea to be consistent and have the input ...


7

This is an interesting question. Thanks for asking. I had the exact same idea last year, and after some research and even an A/B test, I chose to stick with the field-set approach. This is based on my own experience with an online shop that actually ships fashion items. So this is about shipping address; not the billing address. Users who place online ...


7

This depends entirely on your target audience. There are two trains of thoughts, but both have ultimately the same outcome: Tell them there and then on the product page. In detail: Audiences who pay VAT Most consumers will not want to be surprised by VAT at the checkout (it is a hidden cost) and yes this would definitely reduce the number of abandoned ...


7

I'd simplified the choice a user needs to do, by promoting the Delivery Service as an attractive and valuable offer. So user need no to think on his choice (less cognitive load). Still, you provide some clues for him to push him gently to using Transport Service: Display the distance between locations, providing the data for decison Promote Transport ...


6

I think you're taking the right steps, but with the wrong premise. I believe (with no evidence other than having discussed with friends and from personal beliefs) that shopping cart abandonment comes to two factors: 1) Being curious about how much the final cost of an order will be (after shipping and taxes), but realizing there's "too much work involved (...


6

One thing that hasn't been mentioned here is history. Do you need to know if a discount code applied to an order that has been placed in the past? If so, deleting the discount may lead to confusion if you are investigating the order - you may not know what discount was applied (it depends on if you save the discount information with the order or just keep ...


6

Ethical Considerations As far as I‘m concerned, requiring opt-out for any charge not necessary for the purchase is a dark pattern and an ethical Bad Thing. Sites that do it know bloody well that many users won’t have time to read a cluttered web page carefully, and end up including the purchase/donation when they wouldn’t otherwise, and didn’t really want ...


6

It might depend if you are selling B2B or B2C, I'm assuming B2C To me as a user/customer the highest priority is getting the item, actually paying is the bit I don't want to think about, tacked on at the end. For the seller the highest priority is getting paid, and shipping is the work done after getting paid. The website forms are being filled out by the ...


6

I simply can't believe they did this. First of all, it shows a definite bias. Cards starting with 4 belong to VISA, so I can imagine all other CC card companies complaining. Another thing: 4 groups of 4 digits, equalling 16 digits number. It sounds nice.... if it wasn't because I'm an AMEX owner. AMEX cards use the format NNNN NNNNNN NNNNN (4 digits + 6 ...


6

tl;dr "-$10" is about as clear as it gets. Talk like your users Ask yourself how most people write out a subtraction problem? The discount in your example is "subtract ten dollars". Write it like any normal person would: $20 -$10 = $10 ($10) is for accountants. Normal people don't write their numbers that way. And an accountant will have ...


5

Consider a different approach: dodge the problem. If you always have some kind of discount available, even if it's only 1% and posted right on the screen as "If you don't have a code, type ONEPCT to receive a discount!" you'll always engage the user. Your customers won't feel as cheated that they're missing out on something that other people get. As a ...


5

I would advise strongly against removing the step, but to add it as optional step instead. There are a lot of reasons why the billing and shipping address could differ, e.g. people order goods to be sent to their offices people purchase goods as presents some people simply have a second address ... That being said, here's the main reason why you need the ...


5

Best [for users] isn't always best [for business] Sometimes usability and profit don't line up. At least, not in the short term. And businesses are rather adverse to long term perspectives these days. Amazon ran a lot of tests on that checkout flow over time (I ran a similar test myself). The question was (is?), will more users make it through the checkout ...


5

My organization asks for billing first, and then lets the user skip shipping if it's the same. There's a few reasons for this. First, we're a non-profit, so we're most interested in a user's address of record, which is generally the same used for financial purposes. The shipping may or may not be same as that. Second, we sell more "virtual" goods than ...


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