77

Render the confirmation in a modal: This will highlight explicitly to the user that one more action is needed.


60

For me personally I would go with case B: When you are prompted for shipping address I think users immediately know the answer (where I want my goods to be delivered). It's a simple answer. However, in the case of billing address users can be hesitant (makes them think), but if they have already inputted the shipping address it will be easier for them to ...


50

As a user I would expect to fill my shipping address first because I might need to check whether the seller ships to that particular location. Then if it ships I might enter billing address. Some checkout processes are divided on multiple pages. It seems more logical to put the shipping address before billing address, in order to check if shipping is ...


36

The question that was not asked directly: Should we hide the main navigation in the checkout process? Yes, we should hide it. A merchant wants to hide the main navigation mainly because of the conversion rate (ratio between people entering the checkout process and the ones actually finishing it). For average users the checkout process can still be ...


22

I found an interesting trend: "Expiry" is a UK style and "Expiration" is an American style.* Personally, I tend to use the terms interchangeably and unless your users are limited to any one of the two countries, you should be fine. [*] - Both words exist in both languages UK English and US English, it is just the prevalent usage that is seemingly a bit ...


21

I can see no real functional reason to clear a basket automatically. Basket should have a function to clear old(er) items. A "select all" on the list of items in the basket and "remove from basket" action would suffice for that. Other than that there should be warnings on price changes as Amazon does. And of course there should be a warning when an item in ...


21

I don't like the words Submit Request - as a designer that is what pressing the button does. For a user, it is more-or-less as meaningless as Press This Button. I don't think Send Request is much better, possibly worse (where is the request going to be sent to?). I suggest Place Booking if that is what your system is about: booking a course somewhere. ...


20

YES, but.... In fact, you don't need to delete the promo code itself, but the association to the product. However, it's always good to delete the promo code as well, for the reasons below: Make your user's life easier You're building this for an user, and you're building an usability paradigm, thus this paradigm has to keep the user in mind. One of the ...


17

TL;DR: Use a single text field, store as a single string, show an address label preview. Separate fields have served limited purpose, such as safely identifying the country, town or zip code area someone lives in. They also allowed to enforce some constraints, such as providing a fixed list of countries. They also - in theory - allowed to "reduce the number ...


16

This is tricky, because you have a variety of different scenarios for when automatically clearing items is a great idea and probably just as many for when it’s not. Personally I agree that it shouldn’t be cleared. I’ve been surprised when visiting the same site again to find items in my cart that I didn’t remove by myself. But that’s just me — and the items ...


15

I would expect payment information to be demanded only once I've been presented with the absolute grand total, so that I know exactly how much I'm going to be charged. One of the common steps in a checkout process is choosing from delivery options, which often have different charges associated with them. Another example is gift wrapping, which usually ...


15

I'm for Case B. Right when the user goes to checkout, they will want to: See if that item ships to their location Check shipping costs associated with their location Since billing information is directly related to payment for the order, it should be near the end. The checkout process should be grouped into something like: Shipping > Shipping Costs > ...


14

Your shipping and billing information is pretty crucial to the process of placing an order. If it's incorrect, your order will be misdelivered (not cool) or you won't be able to charge the customer correctly for the order. Like any input that has such huge consequences for a software process, it is good UX to allow the user to review this essential ...


13

Though the number of steps you defined looks fine to me, This is going to be really hard question to answer unless you show screenshots of the pages in question since there are single page checkouts as well which handle the information density well and guide the user well. But to answer your question, there is no right or wrong number of checkout steps as ...


13

Change the behavior to fit the intuition You might want to change the behavior to fit the user intuition, instead of changing the design to "make the user understand" the behavior that you originally intended. If there are no major reasons for the details to be set in stone at that point (and they aren't, since apparently they can cancel it before the ...


13

Placeholders gone terribly wrong tl;dr When a placeholder doesn't clarify anything, it shouldn't be there. This is a great example of the negative impact of placeholder text pointed out by NN/g quite some time ago. Summary: Placeholder text within a form field makes it difficult for people to remember what information belongs in a field, and to check ...


11

The right choice might depend on your user base. If it mostly consists of private residential customers, it is likely that they will not need to make any difference between both addresses and that their main concern will be the shipping address. If it is mainly made of business customers, things can be different for at least two reasons : the billing ...


10

I am going to break this response into three parts: Is using the back button non intuitive to the user ? I would disagree with this. The back button is one of the most commonly used elements in the web browser and users know how to use it and finding that it doesnt work can actually be a really frustrating experience as they will have to initiate the process ...


10

There has been some great research into this realm done by the Baymard Institute. Here's their summary of their recommendations (though you should probably read the full article): Bad. How not to format the card expiration fields (yet what 40% of top retailers do): March / 2012 · Completely off. Month names are difficult to decipher and year ...


10

You could sidestep the issue by abbreviating it to “Exp. Date”.


10

I would suggest hiding it if there are no valid coupons which can be applied to it. As per this article, 27 % of users abandoned carts to go search for a coupon codes and if there are no valid coupon codes available, there is a possibility you might lose your users as they might not return. That said, you can use that space to get people to sign up ...


9

The term to use should be "Expiry date". Although the terms expiry and expiration are mostly interchangeable, the term 'expiration' has a primary meaning of breathing out or death. The term 'expiry' however has a primary meaning of 'termination', especially the termination of a time or period fixed by law, contract, or agreement. Some sources claim that ...


9

You should really change the wording on your primary action buttons to make it absolutely clear. "Submitting request" or "Send request" is what your browser does when the user clicks a link or button, but "Pay for session" is what the user wants or has to do in this context to continue. By using a modal dialog you show the user that he has to complete the ...


8

For starters, I strongly recommend not requiring users to not create an account before completing an eCommerce purchase as that just puts another step in their way to doing the cart checkout and can lead to cart abandonment. To quote this article Customers dislike having to register for yet another account. This quickly became evident during our testing ...


8

One of the main reasons might be that a lot of companies use the Address Verification System to match the entered address against the cardholder's address (assuming a Credit/Debit Card payment takes place). In this case you'll need the billing address. So this is the address you need anyway - and in a lot of cases the billing address will match the shipping ...


7

UX is not for UX itself, but for getting business goals. The main business goal is to get money, so if your form is understandable by users – stop UX loops here. The best solution is to provide visual cue for user while filling the form. If your even don't understand the language you can still guess what they want from you.


7

As Luke Wroblewski points out in "Web Form Design", the size of of an input field can help provide your form fields with affordance. The way you've adjusted the field lengths in the billing and shipping sections are good because they provide the user with an idea of what they're expected to enter. It would be a good idea to be consistent and have the input ...


7

This is an interesting question. Thanks for asking. I had the exact same idea last year, and after some research and even an A/B test, I chose to stick with the field-set approach. This is based on my own experience with an online shop that actually ships fashion items. So this is about shipping address; not the billing address. Users who place online ...


7

This depends entirely on your target audience. There are two trains of thoughts, but both have ultimately the same outcome: Tell them there and then on the product page. In detail: Audiences who pay VAT Most consumers will not want to be surprised by VAT at the checkout (it is a hidden cost) and yes this would definitely reduce the number of abandoned ...


7

I'd simplified the choice a user needs to do, by promoting the Delivery Service as an attractive and valuable offer. So user need no to think on his choice (less cognitive load). Still, you provide some clues for him to push him gently to using Transport Service: Display the distance between locations, providing the data for decison Promote Transport ...


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