167

If you feel the 'Confirm Email Address' field is required, but want to prevent people copy-and-pasting it then why not take a different approach? When requesting the user details and email address just ask the questions once. Then, on the final sign-up / payment screen (depending on your application) add a field on this last page stating: "We will send ...


98

I would avoid this behaviour as it's breaking people's basic expectations of being able to copy/paste. October 2011 - an article by blogger, speaker and serial entrepreneur Boris Veldhuijzen van Zanten on The Next Web (which he founded) - 10 ways to screw up a web form and piss me off Number 1 - that's number ONE: Don’t ask people to re-type email ...


77

Render the confirmation in a modal: This will highlight explicitly to the user that one more action is needed.


75

I found an article that explains this. Apparently, in Argentina, ATMs give cash before the card, resulting in a large amount of people leaving their cards behind. See http://uxmovement.com/thinking/preventing-user-errors-in-automated-teller-machines/ - unfortunately there are no references cited so I'm unsure how true this is. To me, however, it would make ...


60

For me personally I would go with case B: When you are prompted for shipping address I think users immediately know the answer (where I want my goods to be delivered). It's a simple answer. However, in the case of billing address users can be hesitant (makes them think), but if they have already inputted the shipping address it will be easier for them to ...


50

As a user I would expect to fill my shipping address first because I might need to check whether the seller ships to that particular location. Then if it ships I might enter billing address. Some checkout processes are divided on multiple pages. It seems more logical to put the shipping address before billing address, in order to check if shipping is ...


36

The question that was not asked directly: Should we hide the main navigation in the checkout process? Yes, we should hide it. A merchant wants to hide the main navigation mainly because of the conversion rate (ratio between people entering the checkout process and the ones actually finishing it). For average users the checkout process can still be ...


28

Since the email field is unmasked, the confirmation seems redundant to users. If the user is advanced enough to copy and paste instead of retyping, the user probably knows his/her address. Preventing copy and paste would just annoy users. When the user copies the email, the user has to look at what he wrote and thus would probably notice a mistake, ...


27

Unfortunately there aren't many real references to help answer this question. UXMovement has an article which Tass references in their answer, which makes some good points about the task flow of using ATMs. In summary: Users follow the tasks in sequence, but regard the task as completed once they have achieved their goal. Subsidiary steps are easy to ...


21

This exact questioned is actually answered! This questioned is an example of a Forcing Function described in the book Design of Everyday Things by Donald A. Norman Forcing Function Defined Forcing functions are a form of physical constraint: situations in which the actions are constrained so that failure at one stage prevents the next step from ...


21

I can see no real functional reason to clear a basket automatically. Basket should have a function to clear old(er) items. A "select all" on the list of items in the basket and "remove from basket" action would suffice for that. Other than that there should be warnings on price changes as Amazon does. And of course there should be a warning when an item in ...


21

I found an interesting trend: "Expiry" is a UK style and "Expiration" is an American style.* Personally, I tend to use the terms interchangeably and unless your users are limited to any one of the two countries, you should be fine. [*] - Both words exist in both languages UK English and US English, it is just the prevalent usage that is seemingly a bit ...


21

I don't like the words Submit Request - as a designer that is what pressing the button does. For a user, it is more-or-less as meaningless as Press This Button. I don't think Send Request is much better, possibly worse (where is the request going to be sent to?). I suggest Place Booking if that is what your system is about: booking a course somewhere. ...


20

YES, but.... In fact, you don't need to delete the promo code itself, but the association to the product. However, it's always good to delete the promo code as well, for the reasons below: Make your user's life easier You're building this for an user, and you're building an usability paradigm, thus this paradigm has to keep the user in mind. One of the ...


17

Don't do this. Don't even do it for password fields. I use a password database (Password Safe) and I hate sites that won't let me paste a password after I've copied it to the clipboard. I'm trying to be a responsible netizen and not use the same password for multiple sites and not use short, easily cracked passwords either, so don't prevent me from doing so ...


17

TL;DR: Use a single text field, store as a single string, show an address label preview. Separate fields have served limited purpose, such as safely identifying the country, town or zip code area someone lives in. They also allowed to enforce some constraints, such as providing a fixed list of countries. They also - in theory - allowed to "reduce the number ...


16

This is tricky, because you have a variety of different scenarios for when automatically clearing items is a great idea and probably just as many for when it’s not. Personally I agree that it shouldn’t be cleared. I’ve been surprised when visiting the same site again to find items in my cart that I didn’t remove by myself. But that’s just me — and the items ...


15

I would expect payment information to be demanded only once I've been presented with the absolute grand total, so that I know exactly how much I'm going to be charged. One of the common steps in a checkout process is choosing from delivery options, which often have different charges associated with them. Another example is gift wrapping, which usually ...


15

I'm for Case B. Right when the user goes to checkout, they will want to: See if that item ships to their location Check shipping costs associated with their location Since billing information is directly related to payment for the order, it should be near the end. The checkout process should be grouped into something like: Shipping > Shipping Costs > ...


14

Well its a human behavior that we never forget to take the money :). When we step into an ATM our primary task is to take the cash. So we are always in a mindset where we are trying to understand how much do I want to take out and what denomination will I get. In this phase we are all thinking about the CASH. The Card is just a medium to authenticate the ...


14

Your shipping and billing information is pretty crucial to the process of placing an order. If it's incorrect, your order will be misdelivered (not cool) or you won't be able to charge the customer correctly for the order. Like any input that has such huge consequences for a software process, it is good UX to allow the user to review this essential ...


13

Though the number of steps you defined looks fine to me, This is going to be really hard question to answer unless you show screenshots of the pages in question since there are single page checkouts as well which handle the information density well and guide the user well. But to answer your question, there is no right or wrong number of checkout steps as ...


13

Change the behavior to fit the intuition You might want to change the behavior to fit the user intuition, instead of changing the design to "make the user understand" the behavior that you originally intended. If there are no major reasons for the details to be set in stone at that point (and they aren't, since apparently they can cancel it before the ...


13

Placeholders gone terribly wrong tl;dr When a placeholder doesn't clarify anything, it shouldn't be there. This is a great example of the negative impact of placeholder text pointed out by NN/g quite some time ago. Summary: Placeholder text within a form field makes it difficult for people to remember what information belongs in a field, and to check ...


12

If you have a reasonably foolproof way to parse freeform addresses or (more likely) only need the address as entered by the user then I'd go for the single text box. In a lot of cases you just need the address to print out on labels etc. for posting, so there's really no need to split the address into separate fields. At most you might want to extract the ...


11

The right choice might depend on your user base. If it mostly consists of private residential customers, it is likely that they will not need to make any difference between both addresses and that their main concern will be the shipping address. If it is mainly made of business customers, things can be different for at least two reasons : the billing ...


10

There has been some great research into this realm done by the Baymard Institute. Here's their summary of their recommendations (though you should probably read the full article): Bad. How not to format the card expiration fields (yet what 40% of top retailers do): March / 2012 · Completely off. Month names are difficult to decipher and year ...


10

I am going to break this response into three parts: Is using the back button non intuitive to the user ? I would disagree with this. The back button is one of the most commonly used elements in the web browser and users know how to use it and finding that it doesnt work can actually be a really frustrating experience as they will have to initiate the process ...


10

The term to use should be "Expiry date". Although the terms expiry and expiration are mostly interchangeable, the term 'expiration' has a primary meaning of breathing out or death. The term 'expiry' however has a primary meaning of 'termination', especially the termination of a time or period fixed by law, contract, or agreement. Some sources claim that ...


10

You could sidestep the issue by abbreviating it to “Exp. Date”.


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