Hot answers tagged

87

How about leaving out the second colour and instead put a border around each bar? That makes it obvious what the maximum value is, but it also keeps the clarity of the uncoloured negative space.


55

This is an absolute 'No no' in creating charts. This is a very bad way of representing data, to make it look like Donut chart but non-functional. It doesn't matter if the thickness is proportional to the value, that is a secondary dimension. The primary dimension must be proportional to the primary value. Having a regular Donut chart is adequate for this ...


53

White is giving the appearance as the absence of data. Data visualization is not about what you intend, it's about what they perceive. Black and white have connotations as opposites. Some cultural connotations are good/bad, empty/full, etc. These vary. Seeing this much black and white is also harsh on the eyes. I'm losing track that these are parts of a ...


45

I have seen the following visualization used to represent down time and it has been effective: The illustration in the question requires too much thinking. The linear time line works well for a 24 hour timespan.


40

The main advantage of visualization is you are just showing the data and nothing else. Adding negative space just to show the ceiling sounds like Chartjunk. If you just want to show the maximum limit, show a thin line and write what it represents. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This is quite similar to what stack ...


38

You could: Remove the axis line entirely. If the diagram is not to scale, then the axis line itself is the confounding/confusing element of the UX that is causing failed perception. Use simple labels attached to sections that are set off from each other only in the sense of a list. You could put a larger space between items that are spaced farther apart, ...


35

Stacked bar charts often use a darker colour at the bottom and lighter colour at the top. Bolder darker colours look strong and more supportive of what's on top. Your chart bars looks top heavy, with black areas 'floating', rather than the bar giving the impression of 'tapering up to the sky'. Outlining the bars would also help to stop the bleed from one bar ...


34

The most approximate chart to the provided images is a Donut Chart. Refer to this link about how to use donut charts.


32

You could show the average in a large bar and put the seperate categories inside in smaller bars. If you use Excel and use two axes, make sure they both have the same scale.


30

You have several visualization problems to solve in one graph. How are the users interacting with this? Your question is focused mostly on labels, however, you also mentioned showing when an element is being split among several entities for payment, in addition to showing sequence of payments. So you have a stacked bar - like graph doing some heavy lifting. ...


27

A decent heuristic would be whether the negative space has meaning. If the bar represents something like speed or a metric of productivity, the blue part in your graph doesn't have an important meaning. In that case the bars are best left by themselves against the regular backgound. Just make sure that the user can distinguish between the value 0, and a ...


23

Start by figuring out what you want to communicate Since you are (rightly) looking for a reasoned, non-hacky way to lay this out, you can start with first principles. 1. Understand the layout pattern The layout you're trying to use is a common one....I call it the mini-map or navigator pattern although there is probably a more correct UX term for it. The ...


22

I have graduated as a Petroleum Engineer, so perhaps I can help you here. This is a domain specific problem and the right solution depends on the kind of equipment you're using in the oil well. Let me give you a few examples here. It's slightly technical but I'll try my best to explain it clearly: Example 1: Casing Installation You do well casing before ...


22

If black and white maps to the colors of the products, then consider outlining the white bar to add some contrast. Some Tips: What to consider when creating stacked column charts


21

Topologically, it looks the same as a Spider chart with 4 variables, but each variable is displayed as a quarter-circle instead of a point.


18

If it is absolutely necessary to see all the amounts in detail all the time you could go with a variation of your second solution but still keep the figures in one column. like this Alternatively you could implement something like a magnifiyng glass to show the small amounts. I first thought about tool tips on hover but a amount could be so small, that the ...


18

That looks like a form of polar area diagram. Also known as a ‘rose diagram’, this is almost 200 years old, and was popularised by Florence Nightingale to highlight death rates in different months: It uses equal angles, with the radius indicating the magnitude.  (Though that means the area isn't proportional.  Alternatively, you could use area to indicate ...


16

A doughnut (or donut) chart serves a similar purpose to a pie chart, except that it is able to show more than one set of data. Think of it as a pie chart with an additional dimension. See the example below, where a donut chart shows sales for different regions for two separate years. This allows to compare data more easily with respect to time (see how easy ...


15

I've implemented something along these lines - here the 'plant' is split into sections and then you display the sections in a hierarchical order and display a count of the red / green from each section along with a histogram:


15

If you really just mean the average of the two numbers, why not just leave the gray bars out, with nothing in their place? It's pretty easy to estimate visually. I think that's why there are few examples for you to base your design on.


14

From Wikipedia: In statistics, a histogram is a graphical representation of the distribution of data. It is an estimate of the probability distribution of a continuous variable. The emphasis is on continuous variable, as opposed to discrete variable. The histogram In the top histogram you've presented, the X axis is time, which is continuous in this ...


14

Broken axes are only useful if they are intended to be used sparingly. If, as you say, the axis is broken everywhere, it makes more sense to use a table instead describing the relevant points. +-------+-----------+------+ | Depth | Structure | Icon | +-------+-----------+------+ | 0 | Oil Rig | A | | 6100 | Foo Pipe | F | | 6200 | Bar Pipe ...


14

A simple idea would be to show the average as a line graph, like this:


14

Your second one seems fine to me to be honest. It's the least extra 'ink', and it's how single series bar charts show averages, you're just doing it for the items at each x value. You can see an example here for your exact situation --> https://peltiertech.com/add-individual-target-lines-to-each-column-chart-cluster/ What you will find is that it's fiddly ...


13

John GB's solution is aesthetically pleasing, but scientific fields generally discourage scale breaks like those shown (and are often cliche examples of misleading graphics). Cleveland (1984) suggests to use a full scale break, making a separate panel, to further visually distinguish between the values. Jon Peltier has a similar example using multi-panels, ...


13

Your first solution is the classic one. The most of the timelines on the web are made with this solution. Just google "timeline" and take a look to the pictures. But you said, you only have a small area to use your timeline, so this could be tightly. I would use a version, where you have the line at the bottom of the page and just show up the events upwards. ...


13

I would say in this case usability should take a back seat to accuracy. Graph B implies a polynomial function of sorts that you have sampled at specific locations. If that is not the case, you should always go with A. For a great comparison of the two, see: http://vizwiz.blogspot.com/2011/12/when-you-use-smoothed-line-chart-your.html


13

You can add a scrollbar or preview chart to clearly indicate that users can zoom in/out and interact with the chart. This makes instructional text unnecessary. See the following demos. In addition to the scrollbar or preview handles, the user can still click and drag to zoom in on an area of the chart. They can also use the context menu (right-click to ...


11

When the cursor enters the graph area, change its symbol to a "move cursor" : EDIT : An alternative solution is use this icon when the mouse enters the graph area : and this icon when user clicks on the graph area :


10

I've encountered this exact issue myself in a previous project and there were a few main things we decided on: Time—being continuous—should be shown as such, regardless of the fluctuations in local times In this case, your third example violates this requirement. All times should be correct so they can be correlated to real-life experiences e.g. "Why was ...


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