Hot answers tagged

52

We are really at the early days of touchscreen technology. While audio feedback and advances in haptic feedback could make this slightly more viable, I see touchscreens as an interim workaround on the journey towards gestural (+ audio) input. The mistake in this design shown in the video is (in my opinion) using a touchscreen at all - i.e. a 'touch ...


42

Doing a Google search for "Why do speedometers go so high?" yields the following top 5 links: http://ask.metafilter.com/182569/Why-do-speedometers-go-so-high http://mentalfloss.com/article/59478/why-do-car-speedometers-list-speeds-are-way-over-legal-limit http://www.nydailynews.com/autos/u-s-speedometers-show-unreachable-speeds-create-nascar-like-...


41

Others have focused on the psychological effect of the practice, primarily with relation to sales. But I'd like to focus on what one should think of with a speedometer that is free of these sort of plots. Different countries different rules In places like Germany or the Isle of Man, there are highways on which there are no speed limits. Different countries ...


35

Thought I'd throw my two penneth in as a former Automotive Interaction Designer for a large British car manufacturer in the premium and off-road/footballer market owned by an even larger Indian company. Starts with "Jag", ends with "...nd rover" Anyhow, for those of you familiar with those brands you'll know they use touchscreens. I'm not a fan. The NHSTA ...


28

To expand a bit on jamesqf's answer, while the airlines decide much of the interior layout, window placement is driven by structural elements of the aircraft. An airliner fuselage has a series of circular frames, and windows go in the gaps between these frames: You can't really change the window alignment without changing frame spacing, and doing that is a ...


23

From: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/making-sense/why-do-cars-have-fuel-doors-on/ Putting fuel filler doors on different sides of different cars thus means that some cars can access pumps from the left. And this makes it less likely that drivers will have to wait in line for gas. That benefit greatly outweighs the cost of occasionally pulling up to the wrong ...


23

My previous car (a Volvo) seemed to solve this problem very well: You turn the car off and the lights turn off automatically. If you need the lights on, you leave the key in position I or II (Intermediate/Accessory and Drive positions). If you have the keys on your person, your car's lights are off.


21

I would say it has to do with the following reasons : Contrast : Studies have shown that black or dark backgrounds provide the easiest contrast and can allow users to read discrete information quickly without having to make an effort to discern details when in a dark environment (which is often the environment in cars) Darkness adaptive : Another reason is ...


17

P-R-N-D is a US government standard, specifically US Department of Transportation Standard No. 102. (It also mandates starter interlock, direction of shift pattern on column mounted selectors, etc) US Department of Transportation Standard No. 102 Prior to this the gear pattern P-N-D-L-R was quite common. Such a pattern led to a number of deaths and ...


14

I think that wouldn't it make more sense to partition the battery such that even if the lights are left on, by the time they die, that the car still has enough reserve charge to start. This still follows your requirement that the lights must not be switched off by any electronic system as the lights only die when they use up the charge in the partition of ...


13

I asked my father just this question forty years ago. His answer then was that it was a hangover from early designs, particularly when petrol stations looked like this: Most drivers pulled in at a pump on their side of the road, which means that most arrivals would have the passenger side of the car adjacent to the pumps. It was all attended service, so the ...


12

The problem is that seat layouts are something that is decided by the airlines, not the aircraft manufacturer. There are a large number of possible seat layouts for any particular model, for instance http://www.airbus.com/aircraftfamilies/passengeraircraft/a330family/a330-300/cabin-layout/ In addition, seat layouts for any particular plane might be ...


10

This is very definitely a safety design. What you will find is a feature known as "auto reverse", this means when the window is going up if a obstruction is detected it will sense it and go back down. In America this feature was/is required with vehicles that have "one touch up" (what you have described). I have found several sources saying this is ...


9

I am assuming that people are now comfortable giving control to the car. One model that I would expect to see replicated is railway train pod / "London Hackney carriage" seating. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Some aspects likely are Primary seats are in the back Sliding door to single compartment Seats face ...


9

Here are some reasons why they are not more prevalent: Users haven't demanded it. It's not something users care about enough in surveys or in customer feedback for automobile manufactures to include it. If it was a must have they would all be researching it and developing different concepts to compete in the HUD space. Your speed isn't a primary focus when ...


8

It gives the car more symmetry which has aesthetical, structural and usability benefits. Aside from the symmetry there are some other benefits too. Aesthetical: Humans like symmetry, it's that simple. With a top-swing you can put one hinge left, one right, and the handle in the middle. And when opened the (a)symmetry is even more noticeable. Usability: ...


7

You say "any electronic system must never switch off headlights", but there are a few cars that have automatic mode for headlights. The cars have a photocell somewhere to detect brightness, and will toggle the headlights accordingly. They typically have a feature that when the driver leaves the car, the lights will remain on for 30 seconds or so, before ...


7

As others have mentioned, this is very much a safety issue and very much worth asking! Fortunately, user experience in vehicles has a long history of study and standardization. SAE International, formerly the Society of Automotive Engineers, has published a number of standards and papers related to this issue. Here are some that may be relevant: http://...


7

Car makers have developed various systems to reduce the risk: Beeps when you open the driver's door with the lights on, beeps and alarms when you try to lock the car with the lights on or a door open, inner light switching off after some time or when the keys are out of range. One important detail is even though such systems exist since a long time, not all ...


7

Speedometers are an good example of UX hierarchy of needs The aspirational speed markings (e.g. above 130mph) are functionally useless for many cars, but they enhance the driver's experience by providing the illusion of performance for drivers who have spent tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars on their car. Aspirational markers may be functionally ...


7

Actually, the US is one of the few places to have enforced a limit on the maximum speed shown on a speedometer (reportedly to stop people trying to "speed test" their vehicles). For vehicles produced from 1979 to 1981, you'd only see vehicles showing up to 85mph: *The same law dictated the highlight at 55mph http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


7

0 nanoseconds. There is always a risk when your attention is diverted from the outside world when in control of a vehicle. From the viewpoint of a consumer: Give me physical controls for the basic tasks. I always want basic navigational buttons directly on the wheel for controlling navigation through screens, volume and seeking, etc. I want dedicated ...


6

As others have said, a touch screen is an inappropriate interface for a driver. The advantage it has over buttons is cost and perceived flexibility. The cost of an assembled panel of switches and knobs is substantially higher than installing a single touch screen. And the more items you want the driver to be able to control, the more knobs and switches ...


6

Barring the technical reasons in the comment, I'm guessing it's because you would usually reverse out of your parked spot and then drive forward? So in the user journey it's Parked Car -> Reverse -> Drive -> (maybe) Reverse into a spot -> Park and neutral would be the shock absorber between reverse and drive. That's a completely random guess, but I figure ...


5

This was discussed on Car Talks this past weekend. One of the brothers (forgot which) mentioned that German engineers have, for years, considered that placing it on the passenger side was superior for emergency situations when you have run out of gas and you need road-side fill-up. By placing it on the passenger side there is less chance of being hit by a ...


5

I don't know this for sure, but I suspect that manufacturers are at least partly embracing touch-screens for business reasons that have nothing to do with UI, or in fact the user at all: Touchscreens are software controlled. That means that you can get the rest of the dashboard designed and put to bed, parts ordered, molds made, etc, while continuing to ...


5

With a self-driving car everybody in it will behave like a passenger. What do you do when you're a passenger? Read a book, listen to music, watch a movie, interact with other passengers, do some work, sing a song, make a phone call, watch the scenery, do a power nap, counting cows... The interior will be adjusted to the most important activities. Facing ...


5

Interesting question. Looking around online, it seems to be a combination of marketing (makes the consumer think the engine is powerful) and manufacturing efficiency (can use the same speedometer in faster cars as well as minivans). http://mentalfloss.com/article/59478/why-do-car-speedometers-list-speeds-are-way-over-legal-limit


5

This almost-locked state is certainly not user friendly when you're not driving. However, when you're in an accident that causes the car to flip over a couple of times, it may cause the first door lock state to fail. If there was no second lock state, you would fall out of the car while it's spinning. In short: the semi-closed state is a backup safety ...


4

A few solutions could be: Color coding on shifter - Forward moving gears could be colored green while reverse is left white. Red wouldn't be ideal since that's so closely related to 'stop'. There are problems with this approach because does white clearly mean reverse? Would a user be looking at the gear when choosing them? Could the graphic on the gear ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible