16

Few thoughts: Lead UX is the top position in an organization which is responsible to drive UX process for the entire department or organization as a whole. This designation explains organizational hierarchy indicating that Lead UX is the top person in that organization. Now such a person in terms of experience may be a mid-level, mid-to-senior or a senior ...


13

There are UX designers that can also create great icons. There are UX designers that can also write JavaScript. There are UX designers that can whip out SQL queries on demand. And then there are UX designers that don't do any of that. Point being, there is no one template for being a UX designer. Having a well-rounded set of extra skills is certainly a ...


13

I did the exact thing you are looking to do. I worked for years as a web designer and started adding the UX skills as it went along, seeing that this field was really opening up. I now work for a company that builds pretty complex software for the commercial insurance industry and find myself involved in listening to the business development people talk ...


10

If what you're showing is just a finished product, then there is no difference between a UX and a design portfolio. If you want to show a UX portfolio, you need to justify the changes made from a UX perspective. The best way that I have seen of this is to communicate the process that you followed and show intermediate steps with sketches and notes ...


9

Lots of great answers here. I'd like to add- Many people who go into UX Design come from tons of different backgrounds. I've seen people switch into it from Psychology, Marketing, Copywriting, Development, and even engineering. Anyone who thinks they know how to empathize with the user. I myself came from a Graphic Design background. The role of UX ...


8

Can you be a Web and UX Designer or a Web Designer with UX skills? Yes. (Seems like I should elaborate. In general, there is no one definition for 'UX' designer. Yes, some do only wireframes. Some do wireframes and JS. Some do JS and icon design. Some do branding and user testing. Some do research and interviews. There's a large range of skills that ...


5

The confusion is created by the fact different people have different understanding of what an UX designer does. I'm exactly the same because I just called it an UX 'designer'. User Experience is a vast concept that enfolds a lot of different aspects, who says that someone who tries to make the User Experience of a website better is an 'UX designer'. I just ...


4

Titles are arbitrary organizational constructs created by the company. What is "Lead", "Principal", "Senior" is different from company to company. Given your years of experience alone you may fall under a "Employee Lv. 2", a "Employee Lv. 3" or a "Senior Employee" -- it all depends on that particular companies organization structure. Are you actually ...


4

You need to know enough in the technology you are designing for to be able to estimate the effort for developing each of the alternative designs you might consider. As a UX designer, you are the person who negotiates with the users the way their interface will look like. The users will always push for what they imagine will fit their needs, plus eye candy. ...


4

I've worked on design / ux teams where the people making the most UX decisions were design graduates. I personally built up industry experience and got into UX that way, without studying for a degree. That said, can you get a job as a UX person straight after an internship? You might, if you have a great portfolio, and someone takes you on with a probation ...


4

If your goal is as you mention: "to study about how user interact with interface and also devices." Then I would recommend you to pursue studies on research methods, I would go for Social Sciences research methods made for psychologist, anthropologist, sociologist, etc. probably it would be out of your comfort zone since you would be subject of different ...


4

The difference is whether you're applying for a UX role or a Graphic Design role. It's a spectrum with most people falling somewhere in between the extremes. On one extreme, for a pure visual designer, it may be screen shots only. On the other end, for a pure UX designer, it may be purely information schematics and research data. Most people do some ...


4

Same basic answer, different words UX identifies Jobs to be done The users doing those jobs How the jobs will be done The metrics used to track success UI design (or web design) applies Visual style to guide the user down the UX path A branded layer over the functionality The portfolio speaks for itself You can use any title you like on the page. The ...


4

UX as a term and discipline is somewhat new. Prior to it being called UX it was often call HCI (Human Computer Interaction). Today, now, aside from recent grads, most UX professionals do not have a User Experience Degree. The degrees and experience they do have can very wildly. Graphic Design (maybe lean towards UI Design) Industrial Design (also UI ...


4

I studied Human-Computer-Interaction, which basically was what you describe as hybrid. Though, it was more in-depth and a very well mixed assortment of classes, like data structures in coding and SQL, but at the same time stuff like psychology, ergonomy, prototypes and user research. I'm not sure how much more into the UX field you can or will go, besides ...


3

Straight out of college you are more likely to get a visual design job than a ux job. Better to go with what you are planning: web designer with ux skills. The upside: Having a web/visual focus will give you an impressive portfolio, which will speak louder than any concepting or write up. Keep learning ux - it will pay off in the field, and in time will ...


3

Pursue the activities that make you most happy (and successful). Then seek clients/employers that have needs best suited to your interests. Its a two-way street and you'll also want to look for support in areas you'd like to grow or improve. For instance, someone with deep research background might do well with larger companies with many specialized roles, ...


3

Firstly, this isn't quite a UX question, but since you're kind of asking about the User Experience for the recruiter/client who will see your portfolio, I'm going to try to respond to it in that context. When it comes to it, a portfolio is a portfolio is a portfolio... it's just a load of stuff you've done, from which the client can extrapolate what ...


3

A UX portfolio shows wireframes (preferably annotated), functional flows, use cases, user personas and more. You should be able to answer questions of why and how you solved problems. Among the tools used in creating the items for this portfolio are paper and pencil; Visio, wireframing tools (example: Balsamiq, Axure) and graphics tools (example: Photoshop, ...


3

Not that I'm an experts so take this with a grain of salt but: Look at questions here on UX stack exchange. Try to come up with a good UX for it, then read everyone else's answers to get feedback and learn more. Start your own projects, this will force you to learn by necessity. As you run in to new problems you will come up with new solutions. Test them ...


3

That is because there's no such thing as "UX Development". It's a made up term used by companies either looking for a front-end developer and tack on "UX" to the title because the UX market is "hot", or a small firm/startup hoping to hire one person to take on both the UX Designer AND UI developer role. UX Design is tool/tech agnostic. It's just being aware ...


2

If you don't have any visualisation skills at all you can still be an analytical Information Architect. I would not recommend this path though. The really good UX designers can visualise scenarios, concepts, ask users, visualise again, create an information architecture, refine the UI draft, based on the IA, talk to visual designers, work with them and next ...


2

It's largely up to the organization that is hiring as to what responsibility the UX Designer will own. If you're in-house, it seems like a lot of organizations want a catch-all designer that does the UX and the UI development. In some organizations it might make sense to have one person serve both of those roles if the workload is light and proper attention ...


2

This is a tough predicament but I refuse to say that it's impossible to get a career in UX without a BS/BA. One of the things you can do that comes to mind is to create a blog about user experience - that's a start. Your blog entries must include: Personal frustrations with specific UI from various devices - not just software. Look around in your kitchen. ...


2

I realize that this reply is too late to be helpful to you Doni, but it may be helpful to others. For someone with 7 years of front end development experience, the job title most likely to describe them would be "Senior UX Developer," which is something I've seen posted in job ads lately. It is done as way to differentiate between UX Designers with ...


2

I think you'd want to be a web developer with UX skills. I think by default a web designer would have UX skills (although several don't :-P) because good web design is often and rightfully judged by usability. The design portion is where the UX starts, but don't discount UX in terms of development. Learning how to correctly serve content through code to ...


2

I think it sounds like you want to be a Web Designer with great UX skills. A web designer who is able to reinforce his designs with reasons behind the layout and implementation. Certainly something which would land you a rad job in an agency, and in an ideal world you would have big involvement with a dedicated UX team, certainly in concept stage, and would ...


2

If you choose to be a "web designer", who do you think will use the websites you design? Users? And wouldn't their interaction with your web site be their experience. So isn't being a "web designer" really, fundamentally being a User Experience designer? I'll go one further and say that in order to truly be effective in designing the user experience, you ...


2

If you look at UX Design as an agnostic discipline (the way most of us were taught), the definition becomes clear. I think it is the 'U' that makes it confusing. Saying the word 'user' makes people think of digital product (something rendered on a screen), whereas if you say 'customer' you are actually closer to the truth. We are even considering the removal ...


2

User experience is not limited to digital by the way. There are so many examples of user experience in the real world. You can look at how products are designed and used by people in the real world and ask yourself how can they be improved. You can also look at how people interact with spaces and how they can be improved ( how subway stations could be ...


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