6

It depends what you want to discover from your card sort. If you're trying to find a general users priorities for 'product type x' then you should conduct the sort before they see your specific product so that you get a non-biased answer. If you're trying to evaluate features in your specific product then you should conduct the sort after the user has had ...


4

First and foremost I don't see this as an issue of time, rather than an issue of how to get users to transition from one paradigm of your product to another. If you plan on revamping the system completely to the point where you feel like users who rely on muscle memory might get lost, you might consider doing a short 30 second - 1 minute tutorial showing ...


3

Usually, but not always, we want to create an information architecture that is aligned with the existing mental model of potential users. In this case it has to be done before, because your visuals will bias them towards the designer's mental model.


3

Both Affinity Diagramming and Card Sorting are used for Product Planning & Information architecture. Affinity Diagramming - this is done with a group which you have to present your guiding question and people will write their opinions on information on sticky and paste on the whiteboard or wall, then collect all ideas you ask that group make the set of ...


3

There are 2 types of card sorting: Open and Closed. In simplified terms, open happens before IA, closed happens after. Open: You are letting people organize items into groups and labeling them. The value of the exercise is talking to them and understanding their reasoning for doing so. How they think about the items, mental models. Closed: You already have a ...


2

Now is the right time. It is rarely too soon or too late to make life easier for the people who rely on you and your products. People do adapt to complicated systems, processes, and interfaces. Most people are more comfortable, in the immediate term, when things feel familiar. And as you say, people will often be confused, or even frustrated, if you change ...


2

The problem is that people hate change. No matter how much nicer you make a UI, there will always be some initial resistance. Many of the big web companies introduce change gradually, switching on new features for a small number of targeted users at a time, starting with the ones they think will benefit the most from the new feature based on their existing ...


2

The question is valid, but it has somewhat of a 'backwards' scent. Normally, you conduct a research (eg, card sorting) with some research goal in mind. The goal will account for the various personas. In other words, you recruit participants based on the fit criteria defined by the research goal which accounts for personas. Consider for example a site (or ...


2

There are a number of methods you could use in order to make sure the navigation works. First you could do a tree test to make sure that you really are having a navigation problem since you say that you have just heard it. You could also do a classic task-based usability study on the site design to be sure that it's no a interface problem. You could ...


2

I think you're missing a key step which is audience personas. Who is the IA marketed at and what are their needs? When you have that, you can think from the users perspective. Then i would do card sorting from the audience point of view. You also need to have a concrete objective to make sure everything relates back to what you want to achieve.


2

I don't think you'll need to worry about too many tags. If the user is putting in a bunch of tags, then I don't think they're using the feature correctly. The majority would want to use a few to target the elements that they want. Depends on the number of elements you're expecting in each column, having a smaller "card" could definitely help, if the ref-...


1

The scenario you have mentioned suggests that you need to simultaneously view the card to be added and the top card compulsorily. One drawback of using mobile device is that you dont have enough space on screen. In such cases you can do something like split screen where you would give 2 image boxes. In one you can select the card that is to be added and in ...


1

You have a complex scenario for sure, but remember you don't need to have a card for each and every item. As a matter of fact, according to Card Sorting at usability.gov: Create your list of content topics. Topics can be phrases or words, very specific or more general. As a suggestion, limit yourself to 50-60 topics or less. This means there might not ...


1

built to work with Donna Spencer's spreadsheet http://www.informoire.com/co-occurrence-matrix/


1

Reverse Card Sort An existing structure of categories and sub-categories is tested The reasons are: Open and closed card sorting techniques are used during the designing phase to understand user's mental models. You have already built a website with navigation structure / flow Now, you are trying to do the usability testing to cross check whether the ...


1

Pattern Breaking is Good! (Question is why and how. ) In UX, context is everything. And part of the context is why to do something, where most of the times, why is answered with "site/app/user/company needs to make money" (surprise!). What you're asking is a very common UX tool known as Pattern Breaking. The whole idea behind this is... to do EXACTLY what ...


1

I would recommend to reduce user confusion that you use additional visual distinction for the non-swipable cards that go beyond different CTAs. Perhaps a different visual treatment, color and even card shape - to help users discriminate between the different card types and applicable CTAs. Try a few mockups that you can test with users as well, to ensure ...


1

Your plan for card sorting looks fine. TO prevent lots of categorize we generally perform mixed card sorting (open and closed), but for this keep some suggestions in mind. 1. Perform open card sorting first with at-least 2-3 user which are potential user or active user of this kind of application. This will benefit you in providing good categories in context....


1

Before you start your card sorting session, I would recommend that you define the objective of your card sorting session along with the audience you are going to be working with as that would define your approach and flow.. If this is your first session, since you are just trying to find the structure of the information architecture, a good approach would be ...


1

I'm from Optimal Workshop. We have actually started work on a mobile app especially for scanning barcodes into OptimalSort, but unfortunately I don't have a release date for you just yet. You don't actually need a barcode scanner at all. The card numbers are also printed directly below the barcodes and are generally just 1 or 2 digits long. So you can enter ...


1

First, it's important to understand what your users are like and how they perform the tasks that your app will help them with. At my current company we do shadowing to simply observe users. We watch what software they use to do their work. We pay attention to the printouts on their walls. We notice how often they're interrupted and how frequently they're up ...


1

Hmm, interesting question. Well, I was in a similar position sometimes ago when we were revamping the web portal. Your condition might me different but the time when we were catering that portal then that time it had almost 400 pages and the biggest problem was their navigation system including header, footer, breadcrumbs etc. and also the copies of the ...


1

Separate the two sorting mechanisms into two separate dropdowns. One for what used to be the column headers and the other with "Ascending" or "Descending." I wouldn't fret over what verbiage fits each data type perfectly. It's generic enough, and it's easily discoverable what the dropdown will do. Adding additional specific terms will only muddy the ...


1

I recommend Optimal Workshop. This is a screenshot of their card sorting tool (Called Optimal Sort) Here is a screenshot of the tool:


1

There is nothing wrong in asking the participants to group the cards into a fixed number of groups, e.g if you told them to organise the cards into 7 groups and you allow them to choose the group names, this has the potential to tell you a lot about their mental models of your solution. As to how much value this give you, will very much depend on the ...


1

You might try looking at this Kelly's Repertory Grid. The repertory grid has found favour among both academics and practitioners in a great variety of fields because it has one unique characteristic. It provides a way of describing people's construct systems (loosely, understanding people's perceptions) without prejudging the terms of reference. It's kind ...


1

Short Answer It sounds to me like what you want to run is a variation of a closed card sorting exercise. Long Answer I have to admit I'm not the biggest fan of card sorting exercises. However, since you're talking about a global organisation it may be the best way to go, especially if you can run the exercise online (which it sounds like you want to do). ...


1

Great question! There's no substantial difference between those two methods. Affinity Map Sessions have two main goals: Generate discussion. Organise Content. Card Sorting Sessions have one main goal: Organise Content. While discussions do naturally occur during Card Sorting sessions, and you can even take notes on that, it's NOT their main purpose. ...


1

Many of the online cardsorting application allow you to provide some questions that you can use to segment the users into different demographics, or allow you to pre-select responders based on demographics. So it is always standard practice for me to group users for the analysis rather than only relying on the overall results. However, it may not always be ...


1

You could use the Delphi method: In this approach, the first participant creates an initial sort, and then the remaining participants review and modify that sort. This imposes a much lower mental load on the remaining participants, rendering a sort of 200+ items a much more tractable proposition (in theory). Ref: Card Sorting using the Delphi Method It'...


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