Hot answers tagged

135

Don't use No with Cancel. They somewhat do the same functionality. I would suggest you go a step ahead and be accurate with the options you provide. We click Yes/No many times without reading the message in modal dialog - particularly, when we are installing applications, or facing some warning/alert popups. As a responsible designer/developer; you want ...


43

My reading of that prompt indicates the following meaning (approximately): I see you are trying to [fizzbuzz the main Foo]. That isn't recommended because [the main foo has already been fizzbuzzed]. I suggest instead [frobnicate a secondary foo]. When I see a prompt formatted like that, my expectations for the buttons Yes, No, and Cancel are: Yes: Follow ...


38

The choice "Other" is a very neutral and well-established term which most people quickly understand. If I saw "Let me tell you why:" as an option then I would have to think twice about what it implies. I recommend reading Steve Krug's book Don't Make Me Think If an analogy helps then your suggestion is akin to renaming the common hammer into "Nail Impaler"....


37

I like to take informed decisions myself, so I recommend (1). If you keep me from deleting my account (to stop those annoying newsletters, for example), even if I am willing to lose money, I'd be really angry. The really user-friendly offer (just to mention this :-) would be to offer to transfer my credit (to another store, to my bank). That's what I would ...


23

I would go with the first Option "Warn the user that closing their account will forfeit their credit" but as you mentioned this might create frustration when it comes to real money, even its only cents. You can reduce this frustration by donating the money to a charity, therefore you can reinforce your brand image also users don't feel like they are ...


14

I wouldn't do this for one simple reason: it might become an outlet for your customer's emotions. An 'other' box stays within the rational spheres; as a user you're being asked for a reason, you're not being asked about how you feel about the reason for canceling. When you ask people why they cancel a subscription it often has a negative reason: "too ...


12

While the existing thoughts here are well, there are legal dimensions that may redefine everything you're thinking about — and complicating #1 Credits, in some states, are like gift cards. The value cannot expire and you cannot just drop it without giving the person a way to transfer it into a 'movable' form - like a physical card, voucher, etc. If you ...


11

If the actions do exactly the same you should reduce the actions to one. Adding another wording for the same action confuses the user, increases completion time since he will most likely re-read the dialog, think about what he did before that makes the system offer him both actions and at the end will raise frustration. I definitely prefer the dialog box ...


10

Yes, you can and should offer a redundant way of canceling the dialog, but no, it should not be a redundant button with text. I agree with this: It allows an "easy way out" for the user: "I don't want to read, think about, and understand the evil scary message box; please just pretend I didn't start the action at all." However, as it's shown, the ...


10

It's not my words but NNGroup's: Simplicity Wins over Abundance of Choice Adding features that have little to no value to most users undermines people’s innate abilities to collect and process information efficiently. "Simplicity Usually Wins" I would strongly suggest solutions like the following for this situation. A simple Hint + Button named ...


7

Use more specific language in your CTAs Perhaps you've got a style guide that might prohibit this, but part of the existing problem is that the microcopy is typically generic. Leave the buttons in the task modal as [Save] and [Cancel]. Restrict so that it's only possible to save from the task modal. Use more natural language instructions in the Confirm ...


6

User clicks on Save and system closes the popup? Yes. Show a feedback message on the screen behind as: Your changes are saved successfully! What if user accidentally clicks on Cancel button? Close the popup, but the feedback message on screen behind should say: Your changes are discarded. Undo The feedback messages / notification play a huge role ...


6

Although users don't like to admit it, they will make mistakes. Ranging from having the wrong mental model of what a button will do to a simple misclick. It is therefor important designers take these possible mistakes into account when designing software. Two good rules of thumb are 'always ask for confirmation when a users action is irreversible' and 'try ...


6

Why not throw in a third choice: #3 - Close the account and generate a one-time use coupon code with the credit balance value (and e-mail it to the user). If the user decides to come back he/she can top his/her account up with the coupon code.


6

I'll offer another option that hasn't been suggested. If a user wishes to close their account, just disable it rather than deleting it. The account and all of its credits remain intact, but it is locked away somewhere where it is not used or accessed. If the user chooses to come back to the site, they can reactivate the account and regain all of their ...


5

You may want to keep the same size for the following two reasons : Different sizes creates contrast, that creates visual clutter. Placing same size buttons around a virtual vertical axis creates symmetry, which is regarded as more pleasing, formal and stable. But, if you have more important design goals, i.e. attract user attention, space limitations etc, ...


5

It very much depends on the type of your application the operation it is doing. Ideally user should always be in control, but there are situations when you will want to keep control when you are making critical changes. Firstly, you must inform user that a following operation might take X amount of time and that she may not be able to use the system. When ...


5

I think this article answers your question very well: Why Users Miss Form Buttons Placed in the Action Bar As they fill out the form, their eyes move from the top of the page to the bottom. When they complete it, their eyes are at the bottom of the page. The absence of a submit button leaves them confused and uncertain of how to complete the form. (...


5

The X button to close a dialog is probably about the most consistent thing users will see across all dialogs, windows, popups, overlays, etc. It's synonymous with the 'get me out of here' sentiment. I don't even have to read any of the content in the dialog, nor any of the buttons to know that the X button will help me escape without doing something unwanted....


4

If there is no safe way for the user to leave the process then you really should make them wait until it is complete. Leaving them with a faulty system is potentially more damaging to the software's reputation than making them wait for an extra 20 minutes for a correct and perfect instal. However, I assume that they've gone through some sort of process to ...


4

if you want to let user focus on one button, i think there is a way to do it. like below, when you click edit, the button will turn to "cancel". If you don't want to save your input, you can click cancel. but if you want to save it, the save button is right below the content(click it ,the item will draw back and open next), you won't miss it if you finish ...


4

I would say you need to use 'Cancel' and 'Close' appropriately, and use consistent patterns. I have always used 'Close' and 'Cancel' in the following ways: 'Close': by pressing this you are dismissing something like a dialogue, nothing bad will happen, and there will be no state change in your process. 'Cancel': the user has invoked a process and they are ...


4

Discard change. Make it clear that Dialog B edits part of configuration that Dialog A controls. Do this by: show system state make the values that Dialog B edits displayed as a summary change-set in Dialog A use different buttons have "Save" / "Apply" on Dialog A and "OK" / "Done" on Dialog B I wouldn't recommend having that interaction pattern in ...


4

I read "Cancel" before "Checking for updates", which is wrong. Place the Cancel option centered below the "Checking for updates" Option or next to it to make it more clear, i think you still have enough space to not make users accidentally click on that.


4

You could use "Keep Timesheet" instead, since thats whats happening if the user is not requesting cancellation. Or you could change the wording inside the dialog-box, maybe you could use "Delete timesheet" instead, im not sure since i don't know the exact context, that way you could keep "Cancel" for the button and keep it consistent (assuming you are using ...


3

Cancel and Confirm as just two choices at the end of a scenario which from a user's perspective have equal importance. If you make one of the two buttons more visible (either by using size or color) then you are influencing his decision. Some times you actually want to influence user's decision but others you don't. If you intend to influence his decision ...


3

The left field answer to this is to make your calculation process asynchronous. In other words, don't trap your users on a page where you don't know how long they will be stuck. Instead, have the "submit" instance an asynchronous backround process, which will then notify the user once completed, at the end of the async process. Basic user flow: submit ...


3

For me, your interaction is too heavy for a mobile: a lot of steps and actions. And Saving action shifts the responsibility from System to User. This makes interaction more complex, exhaustive, and fallible. My suggestions are: Use auto-save for saving the data. This is the way modern apps behave. Display the changed accordion items to improve navigation,...


3

A simpler solution would be just auto save the form data at regular intervals so that even if your users accidentally click out and then return they can continue using the form at the state they were at. Smashing magazine has this nice solution on how you could ensure autosaves on forms - Auto-Save User’s Input In Your Forms With HTML5 And Sisyphus.js ...


3

As @DPS noticed, I also opt for informing Your users the exact action the button does and the visual distinction between the two. These should be helpful (especially the first link): When choosing between primary and secondary actions, visual distinctions are a useful method for helping people make good choices. Should this distinction be more ...


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