210

Beside what was said in the other good answers here, you have a much more basic problem. You are misreading your data. A heatmap generally sums up all clicks on a pixel, regardless of who made them. And you (and the other answers) seem to be interpreting this heatmap as the proportion of users who ever click on that pixel, which is an entirely different ...


86

Performance is important, but even more that your goals are achieved. Consider what kind of users are utilising the sorting feature. Because, for example, it might happen that those users, although few, are the ones that you are interested in supporting. I would suggest A/B testing to see how does removing the sorting affect your goals. You might find out ...


76

I strongly advise AGAINST multiple columns, because this breaks the eye flow and work flow. However, grouping multiple inputs in the same line by logic, can be a usability+++, and will save you a lot of space. Here I made a quick example of what I mean: In addition, you can: Reduce the number of input fields to a minimum (hide optional fields in an ...


40

Do your users know that the columns are sortable? I ask this, because even though there appears to be a sort indicator on the first column, the users may not realize that they can click the headings. What is the average size of the data set? If, after a search, I get all of the information I need in a single screen of data, I might not be inclined to sort....


25

This may be a bit off topic as it more sits under the development side of things. As a full stack developer I can say that search functionality can be performance intensive. This all depends on what is searched, how much is searched, how much filtering is initially done, etc. I'd have the developers reevaluate the initial search functionality and see where ...


21

I think there are some other ways of dealing with scrolling and modelling complex forms that will yield better results than just trying to squash all the fields onto one screen. Ways that will lessen the obviousness of scrolling, or remove it altogether as well as making white-space more manageable and less obvious. I would advise considering the following ...


19

User testing should give more objective results. Anyway, my suggestion to complex form is to provide visual indicator of current field, see image. It allows: to have more concentration on a current field and to return to work faster after interruption or break. The same approach you could see in Excel, which is edge case of complex form, as each ...


16

There are several reasons this practice is common: The company wants to know who you are so their salesmen can follow up with you and help you on to a purchase; The company may want to know if you are one of their competitors before showing you the product (the higher the barrier to entry is of the market, the more important this becomes); The company wants ...


14

You do not need any help here. You've understood and identified the problem with the first approach and have clearly addressed it with your study. Neither a dedicated info icon or a focused tooltip for the full field label are right or wrong. This is an individual user's preference and could be iterated upon with user testing, but neither is incorrect. ...


13

Problem I think there are several usability problems in current design. Wide single line input limits the way that note could be expressed (no paragraphs, no breaks) and makes the reading much harder. Interaction style is non-convenient, as note-taking area is disjoined from appropriate order. This creates jump-and-search behavior while taking a note, ...


13

I would follow the lead from other consumer-facing financial systems such as Mint and Intuit Turbotax. They use the format -$1.23.


12

The context of the form and the intent of the user are very important qualifications to the approach... Categories for Design by Use and Motivation of User 1. Transactional Forms - the intent is to engage the user. You want permission to ask them the next question, and the best form of engagement is a click. Start with the simplest possible question at the ...


12

Based purely on what you have and visually re-arranging things, I'd suggest going from labels-on-top: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups To labels-on-left: download bmml source While wider, it's about half the height, so would drastically reduce scrolling. Alternatively, how about a wizard or tab-style layout? Can the ...


11

You should always be extremely cautious about removing a feature. Most companies don't have a very good idea of why their customers choose their products over their competitors'. There's always the possibility that you will accidentally remove a killer feature and put yourself out of business. You need to have a very good business reason to remove a ...


10

Some good thoughts have already been shared, so I'll just add one thing I didn't see. While the quantitative data around the features use is important, it doesn't reveal why users are or aren't sorting. It sounds like you as the designer assume some perceived value in the sorting function, so figuring out if those assumptions line up with your users thinking ...


8

There are few questions that need to be answered: Is this CRM system strictly for your client's employees only? If so, are they dedicated to using this CRM most of their day? Do these users have uniform screen size? What kind of forms are these? Do they fill out most of the fields (vs less than half)? How often do users fill out new form from scratch, vs ...


8

As a provider of a Saas solution, we are the opposite - we do not want users to need a demo as it increases the cost of sale hugely. To that end, we do as much as we can to make our trial as user friendly as we can including offering a sample data file so they can try it out using dummy data rather than taking the time to enter their own data (some ...


7

Can you explain the reasoning behind this? I think you'll catch the idea from the image. So, there should be clear indicator of non-completed number.


6

You normally design form fields to match the expected input. Do you have a maximum character count for this field? If so, you can display a countdown, decrementing that number as the user types, to provide them with real-time guidance on how wordy they are allowed to be, and also to circumvent the awkward flow of accepting their typing and then erroring out ...


6

I think you should look at @Jung Lee's answer. In my opinionn UX should apply differently on different contexts, also, there's a barrier with the clients that we always forget. It's said that the client is always right, so if your client is stubborn enough, you should agree with what they want (trying to convince them first) in the end they are paying for a ...


6

Animation is fine when it's needed, for example to provide feedback in response to a user action, or—in first/early experiences—to help users understand the mental model. In my opinion, a perpetual animation is "attention spam"—no matter how subtle. Please see my response about looming-stimulus response in this tangentially related question.


5

When designing an interface, you should focus on making it as easy to use as you can, not on doing something new for the sake of it. And as your question stands you haven't really shown what the problem with checkboxes is that you are going to solve with icons and colours. So breaking it down with specific reasons: Checkboxes clearly indicate their state ...


5

Choosing the best methods of portraying information (be it a gif or not) all boils down to the reason, design and implementation. The example you linked to is indeed at first glance spammy and tacky looking but what if that was the intention of the designer, maybe an ironic statement. My point is without more detail on reason for the design and ...


4

Since this is a web-based client-server data-entry form, it has at least 3 major use-cases: new record update record view record Your question and most of the answers focus only on #1. Even if this is for a group that only enters new records, it's almost guaranteed it will eventually be used for views and updates as well and that's where the scrolling ...


4

If your links aren't actually links, but instead are just signals that a tooltip is available, then a pretty widely used approach is to use dashed underlines. Depending on how much you want these to stick out, you can use blue or something else, but I would use gray. You really just need an indication that these are "hoverable".


4

It should have some indication that you can interact with it. Whether that indication is 'making it blue' is impossible for us to say without knowing the full design of your applications and your users. FYI, while adding functionality to a hover state is common, do note that in today's increasingly touch-centric world, it may not be the most future-proof ...


4

I would like to add for the previous @Mishax answer, which is a great one, that most of these vendors make good use of calls to action across their sites. Take salesforce.com as an example. I've seen their site improve a lot since the first time they launched it, however they continue to work with the same strategy of "view our demo but enter your ...


4

Second Approach makes lot of sense than the first. If the product is for the general market, the tool top could be beneficial as the first time users will benefit from that. However IMO, tool tip is unnecessary for an existing product as the user would understand the content without the help of it. Since, we don't know much about the product, this is as far ...


4

I used many POS systems while I was waiting tables and going to college. That was over 15 years ago. This looks like one of the earlier ones I used. If I were to attach a date to the one you've listed, I would say it came from 1992. So, what makes it look dated? There are no graphics, the font looks old, and it looks like the entire UI was computer ...


4

If it was me I would design the interface so that the most common (or useful) choices can be selected with the simple click (or tap) of a button/icon and the less common choices would be accessible from a "More" button (or something similar). See a quick mock-up below of what I mean: Selecting the "More" option would bring up a sub-menu with some more ...


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