211

Beside what was said in the other good answers here, you have a much more basic problem. You are misreading your data. A heatmap generally sums up all clicks on a pixel, regardless of who made them. And you (and the other answers) seem to be interpreting this heatmap as the proportion of users who ever click on that pixel, which is an entirely different ...


86

Performance is important, but even more that your goals are achieved. Consider what kind of users are utilising the sorting feature. Because, for example, it might happen that those users, although few, are the ones that you are interested in supporting. I would suggest A/B testing to see how does removing the sorting affect your goals. You might find out ...


40

Do your users know that the columns are sortable? I ask this, because even though there appears to be a sort indicator on the first column, the users may not realize that they can click the headings. What is the average size of the data set? If, after a search, I get all of the information I need in a single screen of data, I might not be inclined to sort....


25

This may be a bit off topic as it more sits under the development side of things. As a full stack developer I can say that search functionality can be performance intensive. This all depends on what is searched, how much is searched, how much filtering is initially done, etc. I'd have the developers reevaluate the initial search functionality and see where ...


16

There are several reasons this practice is common: The company wants to know who you are so their salesmen can follow up with you and help you on to a purchase; The company may want to know if you are one of their competitors before showing you the product (the higher the barrier to entry is of the market, the more important this becomes); The company wants ...


14

I would follow the lead from other consumer-facing financial systems such as Mint and Intuit Turbotax. They use the format -$1.23.


14

You do not need any help here. You've understood and identified the problem with the first approach and have clearly addressed it with your study. Neither a dedicated info icon or a focused tooltip for the full field label are right or wrong. This is an individual user's preference and could be iterated upon with user testing, but neither is incorrect. ...


11

You should always be extremely cautious about removing a feature. Most companies don't have a very good idea of why their customers choose their products over their competitors'. There's always the possibility that you will accidentally remove a killer feature and put yourself out of business. You need to have a very good business reason to remove a ...


10

Some good thoughts have already been shared, so I'll just add one thing I didn't see. While the quantitative data around the features use is important, it doesn't reveal why users are or aren't sorting. It sounds like you as the designer assume some perceived value in the sorting function, so figuring out if those assumptions line up with your users thinking ...


8

As a provider of a Saas solution, we are the opposite - we do not want users to need a demo as it increases the cost of sale hugely. To that end, we do as much as we can to make our trial as user friendly as we can including offering a sample data file so they can try it out using dummy data rather than taking the time to enter their own data (some ...


6

Animation is fine when it's needed, for example to provide feedback in response to a user action, or—in first/early experiences—to help users understand the mental model. In my opinion, a perpetual animation is "attention spam"—no matter how subtle. Please see my response about looming-stimulus response in this tangentially related question.


5

Choosing the best methods of portraying information (be it a gif or not) all boils down to the reason, design and implementation. The example you linked to is indeed at first glance spammy and tacky looking but what if that was the intention of the designer, maybe an ironic statement. My point is without more detail on reason for the design and ...


5

If it was me I would design the interface so that the most common (or useful) choices can be selected with the simple click (or tap) of a button/icon and the less common choices would be accessible from a "More" button (or something similar). See a quick mock-up below of what I mean: Selecting the "More" option would bring up a sub-menu with some more ...


5

Circling back after 18 months (!!!), we finally have a design we're going to implement, so sharing it back here to close the loop. @Monomeeth had a great answer. We didn't have the real estate for the graphical calendar icons, but I really liked his idea of a flat list of pre-set options and a "Custom" where harder UI could be hidden. I also liked the ...


4

It should have some indication that you can interact with it. Whether that indication is 'making it blue' is impossible for us to say without knowing the full design of your applications and your users. FYI, while adding functionality to a hover state is common, do note that in today's increasingly touch-centric world, it may not be the most future-proof ...


4

If your links aren't actually links, but instead are just signals that a tooltip is available, then a pretty widely used approach is to use dashed underlines. Depending on how much you want these to stick out, you can use blue or something else, but I would use gray. You really just need an indication that these are "hoverable".


4

I would like to add for the previous @Mishax answer, which is a great one, that most of these vendors make good use of calls to action across their sites. Take salesforce.com as an example. I've seen their site improve a lot since the first time they launched it, however they continue to work with the same strategy of "view our demo but enter your ...


4

Second Approach makes lot of sense than the first. If the product is for the general market, the tool top could be beneficial as the first time users will benefit from that. However IMO, tool tip is unnecessary for an existing product as the user would understand the content without the help of it. Since, we don't know much about the product, this is as far ...


4

I used many POS systems while I was waiting tables and going to college. That was over 15 years ago. This looks like one of the earlier ones I used. If I were to attach a date to the one you've listed, I would say it came from 1992. So, what makes it look dated? There are no graphics, the font looks old, and it looks like the entire UI was computer ...


4

My thought would be that it given it is a pretty common pattern that, like you say you want to, you should stick with it. Even if it is only used internally, having the logo and branding helps the user to quickly determine which app they are working with and can help them to find their bearings. This is particularly useful if they are moving between ...


4

It seems that if you remove the sorting feature users will have difficulties finding under performing campaigns. This sounds like an important action, if not the primary one, therefore, you should support sorting. In my opinion, the performance gain would not be as great as the difficulties it will create for users. It will be better for them to load 0.1 ...


4

To me, the key question when deciding to kill off or redesign an existing feature is simple: what will be the net gain in usability? The general rule of thumb is if you don't see a gain of at least 20% (by whatever metric(s) is important for your domain), you probably shouldn't do it. The 20% number isn't important, what is important is that you think about ...


4

Don't worry about 'sexy'; make sure the user knows what they need to do, what they've done, and where they are in the process. Focus on comprehension. Your question is concerned with layout, but looking at the design, there's some other questions that can determine the tradeoff between ease of choosing and being deliberate: Can the user navigate freely ...


3

With any massive change / overhaul, you have to start somewhere. The most important thing is that you start. If you want to prioritize, try doing some research (perhaps even some usability testing) with your user base to discover what things they struggle with, or what annoys them the most. It can be as informal as a quick chat if you are short on time / ...


3

As JonW said; i think you trying to ask if it's a good idea to put it in the upper left and I think not. There are ergonomic issues with placing things there (see picture below). A swipe from left to right could work however and is a common pattern (though you should still inform the user about the whereabouts of the navigation). Placing a commonly used ...


3

I think it would benefit the user to be able to create the chart using a blank canvas, in a WYSIWYG format wherever possible. This way there is something tangible to think about right away, rather than having to select from potentially confusing options ("statistics"?). On the "canvas" there are two main areas to start: the chart box and the legend. In the ...


3

Yes, usage of onboarding stories are a good choice. BUT - a user is only a useful testing subject if he is part of the target group. So asking him to "imagine you are a salesman" is not going to work: The results you will get will always be the answers of a person who is NOT a salesman and ultimately not part of the salesman-group you want to check. The ...


3

Yes! as long as it is a scenario they will encounter when using your software. Otherwise you are testing the wrong user and the wrong persona. Absolutely don't get them to impersonate anyone else - even if it is a persona that will use your service - because they will make-up and invent behaviours that may not be accurate.


3

Before even considering removing a feature (which took resources to make) think about the following: Who uses it? Depending on the application sorting might be a feature which only power users use and cutting your power users from a feature is a bad move. In my experience (and I'm pretty sure this applies to many other developers) power users are the ones ...


3

You provided a real example (tracking field workers) so I'll happily answer from my limited but real experience with field worker management software. This solution allowed merchandisers to task, schedule and track their field workers to make sure they were attending to routes in the right order, doing everything correctly and generally following ...


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