3

In the image below, Facebook uses the hamburger menu on the far right within the bottom navigation as another option.


3

Yes, it is the same with iOS and the tab bar should be visible everywhere. Don't hide a tab bar when people navigate to different areas in your app. A tab bar enables global navigation for your app, so it should remain visible everywhere. (Source)


2

You can have upto 5 buttons on the bottom bar. Unless it is really needed, you may try sticking to either one - preferably the bottom nav bar because of visibility and ease.


2

It's perfectly ok to use bottom nav bar, and also recommended to do so considering the size(height) of current smart phones. Thumb is the primary finger most users use for single hand interactions and bottom navigations make it easy for the thumb to reach almost all primary menu options without a need of another hand. Examples: Facebook, WhatsApp, ...


2

The mockup below is just and example but some general advice would be to save some fixed space to display "Where I am?" => Indicate the place where they are (eg: page 3 of 10). "What should I do?" => I forgot to put it in the mockup but it could be a tittle like "Answer all questions to continue". "Where I can go?" => Show the navigation buttons, so they ...


2

I would strongly advise against navigating back through the tabs. Here is why: The back button is usually for going up one level, not for ‘horizontal’ navigation. That is what the tabs are for! Especially when the tabs are all reachable, stacking the tab navigation under the back button is only an inconvenience when the user actually wants to ‘go back’. ...


2

You could apply serial-position effect to your navigation. The serial position effect, a term coined by Herman Ebbinghaus, describes how the position of an item in a sequence affects recall accuracy. The two concepts involved, the primacy effect and the recency effect, explains how items presented at the beginning of a sequence and the end of a ...


1

I would say it depends. I think is more about avoiding accidental exits of processes and details. If you consider that this could affect your app consider not showing the bottom bar on second level navigation. Also if you want to place a bottom action bar, for example, it could potentially increase the risk of accidental navigation. So you can show two bars, ...


1

There are no such specific norms to use any component of Android. But Yes, There are some usage and anatomy of every component or criteria from the design and Usage perspective. Bottom navigation should be used for: - Top-level destinations that need to be accessible from anywhere in the app - Three to five destinations - Mobile or tablet only. Bottom ...


1

Think about these two questions: What is the purpose of the tab-based navigation? What is the mental model of the user? A tab-based navigation is great because it allows for multiple independent sections in your app, increases context of where the user is and where they can go, and lets users jump between places in the app quickly. Question 1 I would ...


1

Option 1: Allow users to freely move around your app wherever they are inside the platform. A permanent tap bar allows users to recognise where they are on the platform. How to efficiently get to another page. And how to return back to a previous state directly without having to go through multiple steps. It's almost like an accelerator. Having the tap ...


1

Have you considered doing a segmented control nav design instead? That seems to me the more common solution to this kind of problem: https://developer.apple.com/design/human-interface-guidelines/ios/controls/segmented-controls/ As for answers to your questions: Is this [collapsed] pattern a good idea for a mobile web app? Is it unexpected enough to result ...


1

You're correct. When using a stepper or progress tracker, think of it as going up the stairs to (say) 4th floor. Reaching 1st, 2nd or 3rd floor doesn't accomplish the goal, only reaching 4th floor. Each intermediate floor is just a part of the whole goal In the same way, your goal here is to have a questionnaire completed. Each step is intermediate, ...


1

If you're doing user-centered design, ordering should also be based on user needs coming out of the research, e.g., are most users looking to access the checklists function more than the others? It might make sense for checklists to be first in nav, then. Hard to generalize too much here. You theorize "the best order is by importance" -- perhaps, but "...


1

I don't think there's a correct answer other than test validation. I'd suggest you run a multivariate test and get your own conclusions. However, I think you can start with ergonomics considering the physical dimension of devices and how users interact with such devices. In that scenario, you may find different results even on same brands. Take a look below: ...


1

My two cents: 'Home' is nearly always on the left to anchor navigation. That's where users have been trained to look for it since the early days of web design. Other than that, which content areas do you want/expect your users to spend most of their time? 'Checklists?' If so, that should probably be placed next after 'Home.' 'Search' and 'Favorites' are ...


1

First of all, lets understand the use of tabs and navigation drawer. Tabs are used when you wish to display data of similar importance simultaneously to user. while navigation drawer is used to keep data that is important but not very related to each other. SO it is better if you first group your information in a related pattern.Then put the most un related ...


1

You've done a great job, Dan, with the UX, UI and developing a responsive web app. The desktop-view hierarchy works well and is intuitive. It was promising to read your first sentence that claims that you built this as a mobile-first responsive web app. But it appears you didn't fully solve the mobile platform first. (poke in your ribs) Using a bottom nav ...


1

Combining a few rules of thumb: Bottom navigation should persist in all views which can be accessed directly from it. So it should persist on the archive list page. The article view is a level deeper, and does not necessarily need the bottom nav. stacked nav bars take up valuable real estate and lead to misclicks thanks to crowding click targets, so they ...


1

It's not navigation, the button is performing an action, the action being to add a form to fill. The navigation stays at the bottom in the same place as the previous page, as long as you're not changing that between pages, it reads fine to me.


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