19

While there are some blogs that cover a bit of this stuff, I think the best way to keep on top of it is to read the blogs and case studies covering the products themselves. For Photoshop, John Nack's blog is the best place to go. He's the Principal Product Manager for Photoshop at Adobe and often talks about some of the problems they face. For Windows, ...


15

The following are a list of sites I visit weekly to see what's up and new. It is a mix of design, graphics, UX, resources. Their strength comes from following links in their articles, opening to door to more resources. http://www.webappers.com http://designmodo.com http://designrfix.com http://djdesignerlab.com http://www.smashingapps.com http://www....


12

I massively disagree with this approach. Convention > Context. A user who is used to seeing an icon everyday that always means 'view as list' will be disoriented and frustrated when it opens a document. You can make a similar looking icon to open a document, but even then it must be distinct enough that users will not mistake it for 'view as list'. It '...


11

It could be useful in the following circumstances: When the user's native language isn't English, but they are more familiar with English labels than the native equivalents. For users who need to switch keyboards (and auto-complete dictionary) using both their native language and English (or another secondary language). For users that give their old phones ...


11

Google doesn't always make the best or consistent UX decisions. Their Google Voice application (which I assume is created by an entirely different team) has "New" and "Refresh" buttons at bottom-left corner. But I agree with you, putting the "+" in the top right corner is poor usability for frequent-user of the app. However, it does make the button stand-...


11

Saying 'a user will get used to it' is really a design excuse: people may not be willing to take the chance of just clicking on your icon to see what happens. Not used these apps, but Google Ventures uses a good technique where the labels for the icons are shown onMouseOver. I'd recommend that as a good way to teach people what your icons mean without the ...


11

There are several complementary approaches... ...to reducing complexity. Effective design often relies on an appropriate mix of multiple approaches tailored to your user base. For example, Eclipse users (in another answer here) tend to be professional/expert users who understand how to navigate complexity and may want a lot of control. Google Chrome ...


9

Since you mentioned Windows, I would direct you to the Windows UX guidelines on confirmations: Confirmations They recommend the Yes - No - Not Now form (Yes/No/Cancel). I would however recommend more semantic button labels than 'Yes' and 'No', but I know this is just a question about positioning. Edit (in response to Isaiah's answer): Yes, these are "...


9

What I've learned from observing some mobile usability tests: Don't care too much about "thumb hotspots". Which areas of a smartphone display are more accessible differentiates a lot from user's individual abilities and habits. As there are: Individual phone holding: Some users are holding their phones more at the bottom, others at the phone's mid. The "...


7

I think you need to search for multi-device UI or multi-screen UI. I think the concept is so new (or at least was only the interest of large corporations) that it's difficult finding a dedicated website that embraces what you looking for. These are probably the best articles I could find are: http://punchcut.com/perspectives/distributed-experiences-multi-...


7

I feel your pain. My career has been entirely in enterprise web app design. I scour the same wonderful sources of knowledge and inspiration out there and have found this kind of work totally underrepresented. Three reasons why come to mind: This type of work is unglamorous and overlooked. Design is often a lower priority compared to the engineering in ...


7

Where to ask for donations A donate button in your interface is fine, as long as it doesn't disrupt the task the user is trying to accomplish. It needs to be notable yet not disturbing. Other common places are through your app menu, the about screen and the start-up screen. I would avoid asking for user input for donations on start-up. It's fine if you ...


7

Each option has own drawback. Hamburger menus are, in essence, hidden menus. That means you have to click somewhere to see the menu. Bottom menus are limited in size, so that's why you cannot add many buttons there. So, I completely agree with ekapros: If you have few buttons which will be used frequently (functional buttons) by user, then go for bottom ...


7

Adding interstitial ads at any point in the hierachy you describe sounds probably isn't ideal. You don't want to interrupt the user journey while they are getting to the content. I assume there would be a way for a user to cycle through jokes (prev/next type functionality) and this would be the best place for those ads. Every X jokes show an ad. In terms ...


7

Possible shortcuts are via the keyboard. Quote from here: journalofaccountancy.com/.../thoseunderlinedlettersinthetoolbar.html Those underscores are very useful because they give users an alternative way—without the mouse—to activate many commands.


6

This might be a little unconventional, and there isn't a single place to see everything put together that I know of, but check out some of the following: Actual financial, analytics, and complex applications. Try things like Google Analytics, Kiss Metrics, Mint, Freshbooks, Quickbooks, Yahoo and Google Finance, Klout, Photoshop, Gimp, Inkscape, Blender, ...


6

Summary: It depends, but default to 'abcdef...' over 'abc...def' I would choose the method on the basis of whether text at the end or in the middle of the string is more likely to differentiate the item. This would be dependent on the domain (so I don't think isolated studies from particular contexts would be helpful). On a property website, for instance, ...


6

Having split panels will still most likely be the most useful way of seeing both the code and the preview at the same time. Something to keep in mind is that a lot of designers and developers have a lot more screen real estate than what they need to design for, so many have no problem with a split screen. However there are two things I can think of that ...


6

The first question you need to ask is, how important is the visibility of the menu items? If the user needs the menu to be always visible for quick access, then, a bottom menu makes sense. Show the 4 most used items and then hide the remaining under 'more' or something as the 5th item. If your items have status indicators - like number of unread posts, or ...


5

I am going to go with approach C. The reason being while Inline labels are great for saving space and serve the purpose of informing the user as well,they have a very distinctive disadvantage that the text disappears when the user selects the field and if the user does not know what the field stands for he might get confused and would have to clear the ...


5

In a non-word processing context, is it okay to have key presses do actions without having the user preface them with ctrl, alt, shift or command? On a full keyboard that's what the Function Keys do. You could argue that function keys tend to be underutilised nowadays. Without the use of the preface key you can't use the other keys on the keyboard unless ...


5

The big question is: what do you do when they change orientation? If you are taking up a large portion of the vertical real estate with a fixed object, you may leave little or no space for the other parts of your screen that you need people to interact with or see. So for that reason I would recommend against it. If you have an app that doesn't allow an ...


5

Remove settings. Period. Ideally, your application has zero settings. Users hate settings, and they take their time away from the core task they are performing. For example, in a drawing app, ideally the user would spend 100% of their time drawing. The way you remove settings is to make design decisions. If your app has an unmanageable amount of settings, ...


4

I had a similar question a couple of weeks back when I wanted to keep the header constant as the header had a hamburger menu which when clicked had a slide out menu. The feedback I had from usablity testing and reviews from other designers was : They found it annoying that they lost a part of of the screen space to the header always and had to limit their ...


4

Hamburger button scales better with >4 navigational items can contain icons and longer text is robust if text navigation items gets long (translations!) good for navigation Bottom menu very obvious, sticky navigation unlikely to be missed by users great if you're sure it's never gonna be >4 items and the description text is always short good if items in ...


4

What I've seen so far, Restore Defaults Restore Default Settings Reset App Settings Reset All Settings Followed by a confirmation dialogue informing the user that all his/her saved settings will be lost and the application will be rolled back to its original state.


4

This technically isn't the right place to ask the question... but all fonts offered by Google are open source fonts. You can freely use it, embed it or modify it to your heart's content. All of the fonts are Open Source. This means that you are free to share your favorites with friends and colleagues. You can even customize them for your own use, or ...


4

There are applications where it's appropriate or even expected to have a large number of user preferences / settings; and there are audiences who enjoy having those settings to twiddle. The history of this particular case strongly suggests that yours is not one of those: one-off configurations that came up as different clients requested new features. ...


4

As with most questions on UXSE, context is the key when it comes to making decision about your users. You used the example of Facebook which initially had a lot of different 'products and services' which they had to split up due to usage (and maybe there are other technical considerations as well), but on the other hand there is also WeChat which is seen ...


3

I'm really surprised that no one has mentioned Usepanda. Usepanda is an application I open almost everyday before staring the day. Usepanda covers a lot of websites on single platform from coding to Graphic to UX research. So, Whether it's updates on adobe or UX research article, everything latest is made accessible at one single platform. Btw I prefer ...


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