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35

Usually this is done using a table view, which is basically a list of items as well, only with a checkmark instead of a radio button. Sometimes such lists are on a new 'page' in the navigation structure. How this fits in your navigational structure depends on the context.


17

It's because Apple explicitly mentions in its Human Interface Guidelines that all software providers should provide all functions available with a single click and they don't see any use case for providing a right click. That said, it does support an option to have a secondary click as shown below which brings up the contextual menu Now coming to the ...


14

There’s no “right” way. It’s all in the analogy. The Touch Screen Analogy When you use a touch screen, the scrolling behavior is intuitive — it’s like you put your finger on the actual content and push it around. A few years ago, Apple switched their scrolling direction to follow this analogy. The Scroll Bar Analogy Another way to look at (Windows-style) ...


11

Google doesn't always make the best or consistent UX decisions. Their Google Voice application (which I assume is created by an entirely different team) has "New" and "Refresh" buttons at bottom-left corner. But I agree with you, putting the "+" in the top right corner is poor usability for frequent-user of the app. However, it does make the button stand-...


11

I wrote a highly customizable radio button control for iOS. It supports both obj-c and swift. Hope it helps!


9

What I've learned from observing some mobile usability tests: Don't care too much about "thumb hotspots". Which areas of a smartphone display are more accessible differentiates a lot from user's individual abilities and habits. As there are: Individual phone holding: Some users are holding their phones more at the bottom, others at the phone's mid. The "...


7

I think this would then go against Jakob's law of Internet User Experience. Which would indeed make this negative UX. To expand on this further, I have stated that consumers are accustomed to evaluations being in ascending order. Which would be supported by this 2004 study of questionnaires which clearly shows all the values being in ascending order. If we ...


7

Data and research make me believe that: Apple's choice to order values from 5 to 1 is a) intentional and b) evidence-based (references below); Apple is adopting this structure to increase the value of the average rating they get from users ; and - at the same time - the (un)conscious user's perception of the quality of their service. Here's why. In this ...


6

The mice that come with Macs today have effectively more than one button, a press on one side is considered the primary button and the other side the secondary button. The primary button is associated with selecting and dragging and activating (with double click), the secondary button usually pops up a context dependent menu. Earlier Macs had only one ...


6

First, I think a better name for what you are asking about is mouse pointer, not mouse cursor. For me cursor evokes the mouse-unrelated text input positioner (as in the Terminal or text editor cursor that you move around with the cursor keys). Why isn't the pointer choice on clickable areas a Pointing Hand Finger which suggests an area to click on? ...


5

Ignoring the Security concerns, keeping in mind that the password text is not visible (just asterisks/dots), a couple major UX reasons I can think of are: Depending from where you are copying the password and where you are pasting it, you might end up with messed up clipboard entries (changing text from utf-8, html, richtext, docx, etc or something else). ...


5

So in the dark, you'll know which is which without looking at it.


5

Typically, the top performing apps have shorter (branded) titles The average for the top 200 free apps are: 26 characters 4.5 words But it probably doesn't matter App title length – if penalized at all by Apple, is easily offset by increased downloads or other variables weighted by Apple’s app store algorithm. It is up to the publisher/marketer to ...


4

Paper prototyping is a quick and dirty way to do early usability testing. You can do that on a watch UI in the same way you do it for desktop/mobile UIs. Just print out your prototype screens and perform a usability test, swapping out the printouts as if they were live screens. Here's an example (skip to 3:00). See also: Paper Prototyping and Usability ...


3

Ok, so it's confirmed that this is a UX issue. I went ahead and began the installation but it appears users DO have some control over when to restart. This reality is only presented after the user commits to a restart (see image in question). The UX is introducing a false dependency in the user's head that doesn't really exist. Figure: "The initial message ...


3

There is a common trend emerging in interface and interaction design where you show or hide things based on user context and interaction with the website. This would be an example of hiding thing unless the need for it arises as a way to keep the design or overall look and feel 'cleaner'. In a way this is not unlike the browser scrollbar only appearing when ...


3

I can't speak to any particular data, nor why, specifically, Apple does it. You'd have to ask Apple. That said, note that this is an option that can be changed: If I had to toss out a hunch: Most Macs are now laptops. Most Macbook users use the Apple touch pad. The touch pad makes it very easy to toggle the scrolls on and off. Yes, you do lose the default ...


3

As a user, in most cases I don't trust parser that reads the sentence in such human language format. Most events I enter are appointments. Appointments are always important for me, so I always want to be 100% sure that it was added correctly. So if an application allows me to input my appointment like this, I completely ignore this feature and try to find a ...


3

Apple design guidelines state: Discoverability. Encourage your users to discover functionality by providing cues about how to use user interface elements. If an element is clickable, for example, it must appear that way, or a user may never try clicking it. The idea is that clickable elements should be recognised as such without hover. This is even more ...


3

Stats and numbers are what distinguish novice users from experienced ones. It's a reward for having been active on the platform and using it more than another person might have. Specific to your application, you've mentioned that a user can have Friends as well as Followers. Looking at a few examples of such an implementation, Facebook introduced ...


3

Every social network out there displays, at least to the user, the number of friends/followers they have. People like to feel accomplished. People see a higher number of followers/friends as that accomplishment in a social network, especially content creators. People who go out of their way to create content for your site gauge their "worth" as a ...


3

Historically, Apple (or rather, Jobs) has pushed the company towards selling user experience as a whole, rather than piecemeal as separate hardware and software. This has been especially true over the past decade or so where Jobs gave Jonathan Ive considerable power within the company to push their industrial design forward. It's not always been a perfect ...


3

Allow the user to set his own default snooze time and so that can be customized so that he can set when he wants to be reminded.What might seem like an optimal snooze time for you might not be for others. For example, I like to set my alarm snooze time as 10 minutes though for my reminder apps I set it as one hour as I know that if I cannot attend the ...


3

Apple want to make sure that people don't rate apps multiple times. When you are using an app, you aren't necessarily signed in or authenticated on Apple's system. Forcing you to rate the app in an environment where you have to sign in, is a simple way to limit vote manipulation. Additionally, if Apple did it via an API that apps could use, there is ...


3

http://ivomynttinen.com/blog/the-ios-7-design-cheat-sheet/ -34 px HelveticaNeue-Medium. answered yesterday by Mohsin


3

Experience Bias (I don't know the technical term) Despite having 3000+ apps available at launch, many from reputable developers and big-name companies, one of the main criticisms of 3rd-party Watch apps has been that they're slow, clunky, and buggy. Aside from the difficulties of not having access to the actual hardware, developers sharing their Watch app ...


3

UIPickerView You may want to use a UIPickerView for something like that. https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/UIKit/Reference/UIPickerView_Class/index.html UITableView There’s plenty of other alternatives that could be good, it really depends on the app’s structure. You’ll notice that lots of the options in Settings use a master/detail ...


3

You can consider few ways to go about it. Simply just display a alert box saying "Item added to to list successfully". when the item is added, automatically scroll it down to the position where it is located in the list, highlight it (may be with a color fade), for few seconds.


3

In general, I think that from an aesthetics standpoint it's reasonable to combine them. What Apple does in the list is a question of readability. Note how the "Books" and "Audiobooks" share the same shape, but are filled/outlined. They are next to each other, and using a filled icon for Audiobooks with a play symbol would be more consistent, but it would be ...


3

The problem you might face is not mainly in the transition between states (although it might also be) but in the way the user interacts with the app. In non-touch devices, drag is used to change the position of an element. This can be to displace the content inside a canvas (like in a map) or to move an element to a new place. Swipe feels natural for touch ...


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