Hot answers tagged

37

drag'n'drop nearly always has bad affordance. The current model in gmail is the following: Albeit I'm not sure if they're really serious about it, esp. as it only appears to the hovered element. The previous one was this: More dragg-ish, but still bad. I think in order to reach good affordance with a drag-n-drop control, it either has to be explicit ...


31

Usually this is done using a table view, which is basically a list of items as well, only with a checkmark instead of a radio button. Sometimes such lists are on a new 'page' in the navigation structure. How this fits in your navigational structure depends on the context.


21

Three bar icons are now being used widely to indicate a "show list/menu" function - it's not just Chrome. Below are screenshots from Day One and PlaceMe (I only had to open a couple of apps to find examples of this usage). I believe the icon was a poor choice by Apple (in hindsight) - it does not give a clear interaction cue, it's more of a reorderable ...


17

It's because Apple explicitly mentions in its Human Interface Guidelines that all software providers should provide all functions available with a single click and they don't see any use case for providing a right click. That said, it does support an option to have a secondary click as shown below which brings up the contextual menu Now coming to the ...


15

My guess would be that it's so the text renders consistently across all browsers. Not all browsers support font face. So images are the only way to have full control of the experience. Many of the visitors to that page might have a old PC. So rather that risking having the page destroyed by improper rendering they show an image. So that the site conveys ...


14

They're focussing on visual consistency, at the price of accessibility. It's not how the Web is supposed to work, but it's not much of a surprise that Apple take this stance, given their extremely successful marketing campaigns.


12

There’s no “right” way. It’s all in the analogy. The Touch Screen Analogy When you use a touch screen, the scrolling behavior is intuitive — it’s like you put your finger on the actual content and push it around. A few years ago, Apple switched their scrolling direction to follow this analogy. The Scroll Bar Analogy Another way to look at (Windows-style) ...


11

Google doesn't always make the best or consistent UX decisions. Their Google Voice application (which I assume is created by an entirely different team) has "New" and "Refresh" buttons at bottom-left corner. But I agree with you, putting the "+" in the top right corner is poor usability for frequent-user of the app. However, it does make the button stand-...


9

Yes there is. Apple OS X UX Guidelines: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/UserExperience/Conceptual/AppleHIGuidelines/Intro/Intro.html Apple iOS Guidelines: http://developer.apple.com/library/ios/#documentation/userexperience/conceptual/mobilehig/Introduction/Introduction.html Android UX Guidelines: http://developer.android.com/guide/...


9

What I've learned from observing some mobile usability tests: Don't care too much about "thumb hotspots". Which areas of a smartphone display are more accessible differentiates a lot from user's individual abilities and habits. As there are: Individual phone holding: Some users are holding their phones more at the bottom, others at the phone's mid. The "...


8

No one outside Apple could answer this question properly - but I'll take a shot at it. Apple have decided that being one of the four most famous companies in the world - it isn't really necessary. Also it's quite obvious what they do if you browse their web page. However, not being present on the start page doesn't mean it isn't there. On any subsite of ...


8

This has been in OSX for ages, as luxun said, it used to be visible when you enabled keyboard navigation for all controls. Basically, the Return key performs the least destructive/safest action, spacebar the most destructive. Eg: In case of a file save dialog, perhaps triggered by closing an application with unsaved changes, return will save, space will ...


8

Apple's corporate font is Myriad. Myriad is probably prohibitively expensive for someone at the scale of Apple to license to serve on their web site. Also, Apple probably doesn't want to pay Adobe tons of money just to support its design decisions for its marketing websites. Also it makes the site faster with less to download. As for accessibility; the ...


7

There are probably legacy reasons for this decision that should be considered, but there are at least a few reasonable explanations that I can think of: Images allow complete control over typographical details such as tracking, kerning, ligatures and contextual alternates CSS doesn't provide any author control over kerning or contextual alternates, very ...


7

I think this would then go against Jakob's law of Internet User Experience. Which would indeed make this negative UX. To expand on this further, I have stated that consumers are accustomed to evaluations being in ascending order. Which would be supported by this 2004 study of questionnaires which clearly shows all the values being in ascending order. If we ...


7

I wrote a highly customizable radio button control for iOS. It supports both obj-c and swift. Hope it helps!


6

First, I think a better name for what you are asking about is mouse pointer, not mouse cursor. For me cursor evokes the mouse-unrelated text input positioner (as in the Terminal or text editor cursor that you move around with the cursor keys). Why isn't the pointer choice on clickable areas a Pointing Hand Finger which suggests an area to click on? ...


6

The mice that come with Macs today have effectively more than one button, a press on one side is considered the primary button and the other side the secondary button. The primary button is associated with selecting and dragging and activating (with double click), the secondary button usually pops up a context dependent menu. Earlier Macs had only one ...


6

Data and research make me believe that: Apple's choice to order values from 5 to 1 is a) intentional and b) evidence-based (references below); Apple is adopting this structure to increase the value of the average rating they get from users ; and - at the same time - the (un)conscious user's perception of the quality of their service. Here's why. In this ...


5

Ignoring the Security concerns, keeping in mind that the password text is not visible (just asterisks/dots), a couple major UX reasons I can think of are: Depending from where you are copying the password and where you are pasting it, you might end up with messed up clipboard entries (changing text from utf-8, html, richtext, docx, etc or something else). ...


5

So in the dark, you'll know which is which without looking at it.


5

Typically, the top performing apps have shorter (branded) titles The average for the top 200 free apps are: 26 characters 4.5 words But it probably doesn't matter App title length – if penalized at all by Apple, is easily offset by increased downloads or other variables weighted by Apple’s app store algorithm. It is up to the publisher/...


4

Enter triggers the blue button, spacebar the one with the blue outline. I don't think this is bad usability because it doesn't change the standard behavior and allows advanced users to be faster. This used to be a setting under "Keyboard", in Lion there doesn't seem to be a way to turn it off though.


4

Paper prototyping is a quick and dirty way to do early usability testing. You can do that on a watch UI in the same way you do it for desktop/mobile UIs. Just print out your prototype screens and perform a usability test, swapping out the printouts as if they were live screens. Here's an example (skip to 3:00). See also: Paper Prototyping and Usability ...


3

Apple want to make sure that people don't rate apps multiple times. When you are using an app, you aren't necessarily signed in or authenticated on Apple's system. Forcing you to rate the app in an environment where you have to sign in, is a simple way to limit vote manipulation. Additionally, if Apple did it via an API that apps could use, there is ...


3

Allow the user to set his own default snooze time and so that can be customized so that he can set when he wants to be reminded.What might seem like an optimal snooze time for you might not be for others. For example, I like to set my alarm snooze time as 10 minutes though for my reminder apps I set it as one hour as I know that if I cannot attend the ...


3

It looks like Arial has been shipping with Macs at least since OS 10.0 was released: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_typefaces_included_with_Mac_OS_X So it looks like all Mac users will see Arial. for all iOS fonts, a site previously mentioned on SE: iosfonts.com


3

@Benny is right: they don't need a tagline because everybody who is reaching their site through a computer knows what they do. Or, at least, they can afford not telling to those who don't. It's an exhibition of power. The purpose of the tagline is to convey a sense of what the site owner offers, in a time lapse of one to four seconds, so first-time users ...


3

The Basic Concepts - are actually covered on in this part of the Apple UX Guidelines. They used to explain this in more detail - and it's got cut down over time. Originally there was a very handy reading list, which used to list all the academic research which supported the interface design. (takes a while to load as its on the Wayback Machine)


3

Apple does not store your password locally. They ask for it so they can record your "purchase" (free or not) and add it to the database under your account so they can track it and notify you of updates, etc. There is no UX reason to it. It is simply so the AppStore can gain access to your account and make the appropriate modifications to your download ...


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