9

I don't know where the sun rises in a screen animation, but I do understand that the movement of the sun indicates the passage of time. Our generic indicator of the passage of time is the clock. The hands of the clock always turn to the right direction. If we split the clock face in half, keeping the upper half, the hand appears from the left and disappears ...


4

I just want to point out one big thing with your line of reasoning; The sun rises from the east, on the vast majority of world maps, that's to the right. The vast majority of people live in the northern hemisphere. 6.6 billion out of a total of 7.3, according to wikipedia. So they would be looking south, which means they see the sun coming up on the left ...


2

Try visually mapping errors to code as adjacent to each other as possible. Allow filtering and selection to isolate code snippets. Try a split pane view Right now you have a lot of up/down scrolling in both the errors and the code pane below it. The eyes have to keep mapping a selection above to a scroll animation and shift below, plus a potential scroll ...


1

Although I can agree on the fact that animations might give your users more context and feedback on what is happening, I don't think the type of animation matters. All options that you name are animation with which you can mimic the disappearance of the rows. I think 'timing' might be of more importance. Because you also name "remove each row one by one" as ...


1

I run into this issue often, and my personal approach begins with determining if the user is able to work with the first data items to appear on-screen. For Example, if 3 of 7 total items appear and the user can begin scrolling through data, taking next steps, or otherwise be productive in some way then I leave items to load separate. If all the data is ...


1

If the player needs to know at one glance in what order the items are, one line (horizontal or vertical) is the best bet. A grid will add cognitive load to figure out how the items will move up, unless there is an underlying snake-like visual (still more complex than a single line). The only reason we can anticipate how your grid example will move is ...


1

I would vote neither a) or b). The sun should move from left to right for locales that use LTR writing systems. This is naturally the direction of forward progress (c.f. side scrolling video games, etc.)


1

For the people sun appears on the sky in "Analema" ellipsis shape, not linear direction right > left, and perception of sun movement is not connected directly to East and West, than to other factors also. https://slate.com/technology/2013/04/analemma-the-position-of-the-sun-in-the-sky-changing-over-a-year.html?via=gdpr-consent Therefore users do not expect ...


1

There is a special term - Change Blindness. According to Wikipedia: Change blindness is a perceptual phenomenon that occurs when a change in a visual stimulus is introduced and the observer does not notice it. So, your task is to prevent change blindness when a user makes a selection. In the article Change Blindness in UX: Definition there are some ...


1

Each app developer has their own method for building and there are numerous ways to do it, as such, there is no set method. As UI/UX designers, our goal for the app developer is that they build out the app as we had imagined it. Therefore, you should ask the developer that you are working with what they need from you to develop the app. The goal is to make ...


1

How to decide on a speed for the iteration of a loading spinner... ? Experiment 1. Show users random pairs of spinner speeds. Have them choose their preferred speed of the two. Repeat.... Repeat... Repeat... Use the speed that appears to be most preferred. Experiment 2. Randomize the speed of the spinner for different users. Monitor users to see if spinner ...


1

I'd also argue it depends on the size of the spinner. Bigger views need to spin slower than smaller ones.


1

Beside making it look like the bar progresses faster, I think the main reason is so the user can tell the page/application is still working. The moving bar basically tells the user that the application is working in the background and not stuck. If a progress bar is not animated and hasn't moved in some time, the user might thing the application is "not ...


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