56

This image is know as test card (or test pattern) and was originally used as a TV test signal. Before 24/7 TV, it was typically shown when the regular broadcast ended. In its beginning it used to be physical test cards at which the camera was pointed and was later replaced by a digital version. See Wikipedia for more context. In YouTube's case, I can't ...


16

Like the floppy disk icon commonly used to represent the feature of saving for most of the digital products, the animation visual you mentioned was the opening screen for channels to set up calibration during the use of colored or black and white televisions. Since you're probably aged below your 30s and haven't ran into occurring of this image on TV, you ...


6

There are a lot of assumptions here and a lot of reasons on why, I'll try to break it down: It's a historic thing Animations as we know today, from complex Bezier-smoothed transitions to dialog pops are very recent. Back in the day, in early computer software development with UI's designed on Delphi, Java and native, we had absolutely no animations(at least ...


3

I'll admit up-front that I'm a bit of a "Luddite" as regards web-design: I generally dislike animations, and mostly prefer clean, simple designs. Having said that, I'll try to be as objective as possible... There's an often subtle difference between having "intuitive page/view transitions" and "adding frills for the sake of it". Like so much of UI design (...


3

"3D Talking Avatar" seems to be the closest phrase that matches what I think you're looking for. From a UX perspective, they probably went out of style for a reason; avatars give the appearance of being conversational, but they're one-sided. Chat boxes let the user drive the conversation. And it's become a lot easier to incorporate video.


2

It sounds like your loading indicator matches your theme, your users love it, and it's doing its job as a loader – these are clues that it's good UX. If it provides enough positive distraction, it might even make the load time appear to be less than what it actually is. Thus, a plain, standard loading indicator might not provide more benefits. If you ...


1

I'm not sure I understand this part: if the user is creating a job (which would mean they're filling out a form), if they inadvertently click "< Back", then the entire screen is going to get replaced by the Home page. However, to address the highlighting of a default item: IN GENERAL, you should never highlight or default to an option. ...


1

Actually, anything complex will probably look nice on first impression (since most of the loading animations tend to be basic), but the more times you look at it the less appealing it will generally be (especially when the loading time is long). Complexity on the loading interaction isn't just limited to the animation itself. Depending on the type of ...


1

Once suggestion is use the inspect too to look at a few buttons on different websites to compare the timing and easing in them. Normally for animation i'd follow the following When ui elements are entering the screen, use Ease-out animations For ui elements that are exiting, use Ease-in animations which are accelations The case you mention can be a bit ...


1

It's a WCAG accessibility requirement (2.2.2): For any moving, blinking or scrolling information that (1) starts automatically, (2) lasts more than five seconds, and (3) is presented in parallel with other content, there is a mechanism for the user to pause, stop, or hide it unless the movement, blinking, or scrolling is part of an activity where it is ...


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