Hot answers tagged

129

"Recovered" is a poor choice of words here. All that app is trying to do is warn people that the action is not reversible and they can't simply hit cancel or undo and all their files will be returned. A better solution would be: Formatting SD card will delete all data. This action cannot be undone. Continue? This is more direct to the point that you ...


63

Many ways to perform the same action is fine Just make sure they don't get in the way of the most important task at hand. No two users are created equal Anyone who has done usability testing knows that each person has their own unique workflow. It is good to accommodate each individual style and workflow. Andrew Martin correctly points out in the comments ...


59

The physical mute and volume buttons affect all other apps too. It's better to have a mute button in your app because as a user I may only want to mute the notifications from your app and not others. For example, there's a chance I want to mute Facebook notifications but not those from Twitter. So for that I'd need a mute button in Facebook because the ...


47

I was recently researching the use of Material Design in iOS apps and came across this UpLabs article which makes an interesting point: Various elements both visual and underline mechanics could certainly be incorporated into iOS apps. However, it is important to stay true to the operating systems nature. Forcing a user to adapt or take on new sets of ...


43

It's ok, and it's good! Why? because it creates consistency and builds and reinforces UI patterns for users. Imagine if every other UI of each app was very different. Users would need to re-familiarize themselves whenever they switch between apps. But… At the same time, copying UIs and not thinking about how these can be improved (and try come up with the ...


38

In short, NO, they do not have enough contrast. According to Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) they mostly do not have enough contrast. Only 1 out of 8 tests gets a pass. But the dark blue text on light gray background mostly passes. But there are other factors In essence, we should be comparing icons to whole words, not individual letters. So ...


35

Make the title of the workout the same as the active click colour, so that it prompts users to click on the title. Even if the whole card is active - it gives the user something to focus on.


30

I see no problem with the message that other suggestions completely solve. Formatting SD card will delete all data. Data cannot be recovered. Continue? Data cannot be recovered gives a very good sense of urgency, and speaks well to the target audience who at this juncture needs to know the likely worst case scenario. Even though the data can be recovered,...


29

It's tempting to say that because we're not used to it, it must not be a good experience. I think we mean that change is necessarily a good experience... it's not comfortable, but the end result may actually be better than what we had before. We are used to toolbars, but how often do we get lost in menus or confused by a row of buttons? The single floating ...


28

Having two fonts, one for headers and one for body text, is generally accepted. Do not use more than two fonts. Three's a crowd. What's important for you is to create visual hierarchy. You can do this by having contrast between font size, weight and color for your header and body text. If you find that using one font for both is not creating enough contrast ...


26

I've seen chevrons become popular for things like this. Big fat areas that are easy to press, along side footers with an ellipse. Pretty familiar symbols that imply expandable content without having to read.


22

Per the Material Design Guidelines on top-level view strategies, three main strategies are: Focus on a single view with embedded navigation. By putting all the necessary navigation directly inline with other app content, you make it extremely visible to the user. This can be appropriate when the app’s navigation model is very simple. However, presenting a ...


19

The good: Fitt's Law: The bad: The biggest flaw in Google's Material design resides in feedback when you press a button. In the physical world a pressed button recedes into the background; in Google's Lollipop the opposite happens, when you press a button, it floats, which is contrary to what the user is accostumed to.


17

Your current design may be lacking in a few areas. Generally, using icons alone leave a lot up to user interpretation and personal experience, even if it is as globally recognizable as the photo icon, or the pencil icon. Here is an excerpt from the NN Group on Icon Usability; Icons Need a Text Label To help overcome the ambiguity that almost all ...


16

"show more" link (near the bottom) The easiest and clearest way to do this is with a clearly labeled link... show more If the link is there then I know there is stuff not showing. "expand card / collapse card" link (in the upper right corner) If you think your users will want to both show and hide the additional content then make sure the link to do ...


16

I don't think it's a problem. There are many applications for iOS that use Material Design. Think of all the Google applications (Youtube, GMail, etc) iOS users use on a daily basis. You might want to consider using Material Design as a source of inspiration. Make use of their behaviours or specific elements, but also use your own research and branding. I'...


15

Really good question. I've thought about this inaccuracy (although in a security, not UX context) and had to explain to several colleagues that most "delete" options (yes, even formatting a drive) are not secure and that the data is quite often recoverable. I have never found it difficult, nor has anyone failed to understand, that the way to think about ...


15

Keep navigation grouped together. Keep the navigation elements together to establish consistency across the application. So if you have navigation elements besides the tabs at the top, make the tabs sub-headers. If the tabs are the only navigational elements, then choose what makes the most sense given the context of your application, just make sure to be ...


14

One idea: draggable multiple range sliders Instead of 13 checkboxes you could use one slider, on which the user can select multiple ranges and single values. See an example of such a slider here: http://blog.153.io/Elessar/. Your slider would then go from 6 to 18 and instead of having time labels you could show the selected age. When moving the spans you ...


14

Material Design is not "Android design", it's Google's all encompassing design "template" for both mobile and web apps. Many Google web products use Material Design like Angular (https://angular.io/) or, you know, Material Design site itself (https://material.io/guidelines/). They even have a library made specially for the web called Material Design Lite ...


13

Android developer docs has a section titled Advertising Without Compromising User Experience Unfortunately, it only highlights the don't do's rather than the do's: When deciding where to place ads within your application, you should carefully consider user-experience. For example, you don’t want to fill the screen with multiple ads that will quite likely ...


13

A stands for Accent. They are colors that accent the primary colors. Here's what Google says: UI Color Application Choose your palette Limit your choice of colors by choosing three color hues in the primary and one accent color in the secondary palette. The accent color may or may not need fall back options. Accent color The vibrant accent ...


13

TL;DR: An app forcing me to use the global mute would be uninstalled in the blink of an eye. So they better have a mute function if they want to use audio at all. EDIT: The previous was a bit too short for an answer, here's an explanation: Audio is in essence quite intrusive, that is, you can hardly block it out. That's different from vision - you can ...


13

Some users won't want to give a second app access to their Facebook or Google information. Some apps only require Facebook login (for example) to ensure the identity of the user. This is because it is important for the service the app offers. In those cases having verified users gives a better user experience for the rest of users, so it is beneficial in ...


13

You should avoid using two different fonts for the following reasons: You create unnecessary contrast, which creates clutter. The visual hierarchy is already established by the difference in font size and weight. Reading with one font is faster than reading with two different fonts, a phenomenon called Font tuning: Font tuning (FT) occurs when observers ...


13

I recently did some testing with a similar design where the cards were not tappable, only the button like your "Start". The participants mostly expect cards and tiles to be tappable IF there is only one action. They also tended to click on the headers. In your design, I would think that tapping the card would start the workout, so if you want to have two ...


12

There are some brilliant examples of start-up walkthroughs. Typically there are two types of start-up prompts, walkthroughs and coach screens. Walkthroughs These are usually slides, often with animations that contain an overview of features, ending in a call-to-action. Twine: One good example of animations is Twine, which makes you scroll through to the ...


12

There is a way . . . Source: http://www.forwardbutton.org/2013/10/google-chrome-for-android.html 2021.04.25 Seems that link is dead and gone.


12

First off, I prefer calling it a 'navicon', helps me to avoid hunger issues during working hours. Secondly, not all of your points are actually about the hamburger icon (3 & 4). The other ones are more about the navigation drawer in general. Anyways, let's commence.. People tend to show a lot of options with them. A lot of options isn't going to be ...


12

There is consensus within the research community and practicing UX professionals that color definitely has an impact on how a site or application is perceived by the user (paper discussing design factors). The Society for Technical Communications published an article in 2011 entitled Color Matters: Color as Trustworthiness Cue in Web Sites. It's likely the ...


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