35

Make the title of the workout the same as the active click colour, so that it prompts users to click on the title. Even if the whole card is active - it gives the user something to focus on.


13

I recently did some testing with a similar design where the cards were not tappable, only the button like your "Start". The participants mostly expect cards and tiles to be tappable IF there is only one action. They also tended to click on the headers. In your design, I would think that tapping the card would start the workout, so if you want to have two ...


10

The burger menu should be displayed on all of your top level destinations - the same screens that are listed in your navigation drawer. When the user navigates to a deeper level, from one of these top level destinations, the burger menu will be replaced by either a back or close icon. The back icon is typically used for view only screens, whereas the close ...


8

There's nothing wrong with having clickable cards. An example of that is YouTube: when you're browsing a list of videos, each video is represented with a card. Notice that the card also has a "show more" button, which brings up a dropdown menu with additional actions. Most of the time, however, the user will just want to watch the video, and so that's what ...


7

As you mentioned, asking for unnecessary permissions hurts your credibility. You need a good reason to ask for what you want. A new user doesn’t know the first thing about how this app works, so they have no incentive to say yes. What you could do - if there truly are no workarounds - is use priming screens. You didn't mention what your app does, but ...


7

I think when a big chunky object represents an action by interacting with it directly (clicking, tapping, hovering, etc) there should be an explicit visual hint (especially given "Cards" in Material Design are not usually directly interactive). Forgive the crude mock-up, but I added chevrons to the cards and I think that makes it obvious they're clickable ...


6

Make very clear what you want your user to do. By knowing this you can create a hierarchy of icons that fits your user goals. I would sort the icons in three levels. Primary action (large button) Secondary actions (set of icons) Optional actions (hidden behind menu icon) Do this by having a larger button for the action, not just an icon. The secondary ...


5

"But red is our BRAND!" shouts someone from BBC's design department. It's 2018, and by now everyone has spent a lot of time using digital applications. We've seen a lot of red things on our computer screens and they mostly are warning us that something went wrong. After a while, certain colors began to carry with them strong connotations. Just look at ...


5

There are a few options you could do here: OPTION 1 Why not type it? All the user needs to do is select the field and then type the number (with the majority of selections having just 1 number in anyway). Entering numeric values on a number pad is generally more efficient for users. There are only 12 options in a list which is probably too long for a ...


4

Because smartphones are used outdoors... I suspect it is mostly fashion and showing off, as Koen Lageveen suggests here. However, there is a potential usability benefit. Smartphones are more likely to be used outdoors in bright ambient light. Bright ambient light tends to wash out colors, all other things being equal. If the color saturation were lower, ...


4

Airbnb Cereal is Airbnb's bespoke typeface (i.e. a typeface custom designed for the company to serve their needs) and can be used only by Airbnb and their partners in some way. So legally you are not allowed to use the font in your application.


4

The broader strategy is called "onboarding". User onboarding...is the process through which new software is designed such that new users are provided and acquire the necessary knowledge, skills, and behaviors in order to become “up and running” and effective users of website, app, or software service.1 The manner in which you achieve this can vary. ...


3

According to the developer options, it is called the "power menu" I attached a screenshot of the developer options from Android Nougat


3

Considering you have a little space below the submit button. Think of doing this: The additional options will behave as secondary actions. Try placing the links in vertical order, or above the Submit button and see which option works better.


3

I'd like to have a few views on how well this is likely to go down with people used to "typical" Android app UIs. The best way to find that out is to conduct user testing with a good variety of people fitting your target audience. My personal take: I didn't know what a jog dial was and how it differed from a circular dial. When I looked at your wireframe, ...


2

Seeing that bright and colourful display and might cause you to think "wow this is a great phone I'm going to buy it". That experience and the moment of purchase is actually a pretty strong part of the user experience of owning something and very important aspect of the customer journey. Also, properly calibrated colours are usually a bit dull. If you don'...


2

To make it simpler, I would recommend: Having as default value 17%. In the case that the user changes, they can see the information message which states that the default value is 17% The label can be placed in different places, depending on your overall design.


2

I'd remove the toggle as it is unnecessary and put the VAT in as it is, change the prompt underneath to something like "Type over the default rate to change it."


2

In your situation it is justified to test on one platform. iOS and Android generally only differ in OS level functionality, so once the user enters the app it's essentially the same user experience. The areas where it may differ are: Swiping from the edge of the screen might reveal OS overlay i.e. Notifications overlay. Access to OS level functions ...


2

When the user presses the button, add a new item to the list with a text field instead of the title. Ensure that the keyboard is displayed and focus is automatically set to the text field, so the user can immediately start typing their title. You should also ensure that the new item is above the keyboard. This is how the Apple's Reminders app works, ...


2

You need to inscribe the 'settings' in the ellipsis more button in the Bottom Navigation bar. Directly giving the settings button on the bottom navigation bar also would work, if you have much space in the same.


2

From the Material HIG: Dialogs should not include more than two actions. A third action, such as “Learn more,” navigates away from the dialog, potentially leaving the task unfinished. Avoid using a “Learn more” action to access help documentation; in-line expansion within the dialog should be used instead. If more extensive information is ...


2

First: thanks for the info about spinners, this was new to me! To answer your question: I think you and your designer are both right in general but in this case i would display the spinner even if there is only one option available at this moment. Why? Because over time there will be more options available. To communicate this to the user you should ...


2

I would believe that you are asking the wrong people this question... You should ask if your target group understands that and not what bunch of designers experienced about this. My advice - do some testing with your users and you will see!


2

480x800 is the size of an android device screen/view in Pixels. For us to choose sizes we generally either: See what the most popular screen size is among users and go with that OR talk to the devs and see what size they prefer. For example our devs like 320 x 480 px as its the smallest we cater for and its easier to scale up than down. (coincidentally ...


2

Without really knowing more about the specific use-case, consider your data. Good UX is all about providing the clearest and simplest way to get the minimum data required to do the job to the user's specifications. You said in your comment that you've got Color Family, Color Code and Packaging and this is a loop you'll need to run through quickly for ...


2

You can show a dialog, when user clicks in that field , show 1 -12 values on that, on which user can just tap. In this way user can input desired value in just two taps.


2

If you're like me, and usually aim for the most friction-less experience for the user, I'd go with the following: UI: Auto focus the field User: horizontal/vertical scroll to select numbers User: tap Done/OK/Submit (whatever you use/want the user to do in) Cheers


2

If I understand correctly, it can be confusing for a user to enable a setting from a screen which only contains login information. Nevertheless if this is mandatory and within actual context, I would put it within the white card, between the password field and login button so there is a hierarchy of actions (1. enter pwd, 2. choose setting 3. login and ...


1

There is no need of the button 'Find On Map' at all. You could tackle it the following way:- By two way binding the address and the map. When the user types in and selects a location, the input field is filled with the selection as usual + the map auto scrolls to that location. When the user tries to select a location from the map directly by scrolling ...


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