Hot answers tagged

173

Don't write error messages blaming the user. There is no actual benefit to you from doing this. In the event that someone accidentally triggers these error messages, you damage your relationship with them. Even if you do manage to tell a single malicious user that you know they're malicious, it isn't going to make them like you any better. All you're ...


120

Mostly it’s crying wolf. Ninety-nine percent of the time the user selects the command, that’s exactly what they mean to do, so they very quickly get in the habit of smacking the OK button without more than a glance at the message. Designers don’t help the situation often providing vague, incomplete, or jargony messages, so that if users do take the time to ...


91

In situations where consequences may be truly disastrous you may copy this idea from github: Dangerous actions are marked (red bar in background), user is forced to read this box and it is verified as simply punching button is not enough. Note that using it for anything less than "nuke big collection of data" used once a year will result in furious users.


40

A checkmark represents something positive - usually 'good' or 'correct', so you shouldn't use it to represent something negative like 'serious violation'. I would focus on using either a X or a warning sign, with a preference for the warning sign. Icon aside, I don't see any good reason to have columns for both 'serious violation' and 'Overall alert'. The ...


39

There was a new cookies law passed last year in the EU that required websites to inform users if they place cookies. More info here http://web.archive.org/web/20130606040906/http://www.netmagazine.com/features/beginners-guide-new-cookie-law From a UX perspective it's obviously a negative thing and is just an onerous legal obligation people have to comply ...


34

To the question of: How do I keep the user aware of important events without inundating them? Make sure your updates are meaningful. UAC, TOS', and EULA's are constantly skipped over because they don't provide meaningful content to their user. UAC, for many, is simply annoying - users feel that they shouldn't be warned every time they want to do ...


27

The first thing you have to find out is, if it's really a troll. Your Contact Form and Feedback Form examples have nothing to do with trolls. It's just a feedback message. The third example sounds like a hacker or script kiddie who's trying something, also no troll. So for the first two examples, choose a error message that tells what to do, but does not ...


21

On closer inspection of your question, I am revising my answer. What you're trying to convey is "Does this company have a failure (i.e. non-compliance to some standard)? Yes or No". In which case, color is irrelevant, it's not a failure, and a check mark is somewhat standard. Consider a table where multiple types of the same thing, like a tablet computer, ...


17

I would use a red exclamation point as the Icon in the column (similar to the Icon JohnGB used. My first thought was to rename the column so you could use a red X. For example if you renamed it to 'Conforming', 'In Good Standing', 'No Violations', or 'Playing By the Rules', then you could use a red X to indicate that the company is NOT conforming, or has a ...


17

Quick Answer In your case that color scheme is NOT safe for colorblind people. First of all don't forget that there are different types of color vision deficiency. Let's summarize why your image is not safe (to reproduce this just pick two different on-line color blindness simulators): Achromatopsia: they see only shades of gray then obviously all boxes ...


15

Notifications choice often depend on what system you are building for. If you are building for an existing platform e.g. an iOS app or Android app, then most platforms have guidelines which are in place to keep the use of these consistant throughout all these platforms applications. Here are a selection of these resources: Microsoft - UX guidelines for ...


14

I'd try something like this: When pre-populated, show an icon next to the field with a tooltip on hover. When modified, swap the icon for a link that, when clicked, restores the calculated value.


13

In some cases the best way to warn the user about dangerous actions is to... not warn them at all. Just do it, and notify them clearly and concisely what just happened. But then add an undo button, Gmail-style. Actually I lied, you don't want to "just do it", you want to appear to do it and delay the actual action until it's clear the user doesn't want to ...


13

I would start with different (and larger) icons for the notes in the table/grid e.g. an icon of a note with a padlock for internal notes and icon of a chat symbol for external notes Then I'd consider moving the icons closer together, to make the differences between them more noticeable (to prevent user from only noticing one). Make sure they are not too ...


9

The benefit of an audible alarm is that it gives the operator information without them having to look at the screen - and hopefully draws their attention to the screen. Each sound is also different to give the operator quick feedback on what the alarm is. So when you have multiple simultaneous alarms, playing only one of the alarms would give ...


9

The system is clear and it certainly will work. The only thing to note is that customer B might have less probability than initial A to go, because he might have done other plans. So instead of B being auto-confirmed maybe B should have a period of time to confirm. If he doesn't confirm in that period of time the opportunity passes to C. Another ...


8

In a related point, there is a law in effect here in the US that affect most websites. I'm working on updating content on several large websites for this change. The California Internet Privacy Bill. Our legal counsel has boiled it down to the following points. If any consumers of your web service are located in the state of California, you must: Explain ...


8

My assumption is that it's a combination of the following arguments: Shutting down is a relatively uncommon action (for dealing with your example about getting undesired calls, the do not disturb feature and airplane mode are much more convenient). There are sometimes issues identifying the intent of the user based on voice input. It would be very ...


8

You should consider checking any color palette options using an on-line simulator such as Coblis (http://www.color-blindness.com/coblis-color-blindness-simulator/), which shows you how images look simulating various color-blindness variations: It is also generally accepted that to guard against this sort of issue, it can be wise to use shape, contrast, and/...


7

An approach I have seen and liked is to break the flow of the application. Although for most things this is a bad UX, I think for potentially catastrophic or dangerous actions, it is sometimes a good idea. For example, on console games generally the button at the bottom such is the accept or OK button. So for wiping all data, as an example Y could be made ...


7

You've stumbled across an 'age old' question of feedback Do we provide feedback if an action completes as it should, or only if it fails? In reality this is often not a user experience question but business decision 'from above'. I expect in the anti-virus example above it is just to remind the user of the product/company and so they think "oh yeah that's ...


7

I would say you should explicitly label them as such: Maybe even do a bootstrap-like popover notification when they hover the green, Client Notes, icon which explicitly states that These notes are visible to the client! Update After reading your comment I would like to update the answer to mention that adding alerts, confirmations, Captchas, etc...are ...


6

A red tick mark seems ambiguous, "Is it acceptable but not good?", "It is completed but has some problems?" or something else? Since, check mark is something which represents completion or acceptance/approval. For violation, you might use a X like John suggested or you can go for a circle with a backward slash (the symbol for prohibition).


6

This is actually cultural thing. In US and Germany, X is commonly used as check mark. In most of the countries it is ✓. In Japan its O mark is used.


6

Emotions is widely used and expresses feelings, mode and tone of the sender of the message. It’s mostly used in between people communication, where you in a text message can convey irony, sadness, excitement or happiness, which would take too long to write out, especially if the number of characters are limited. In the more recent years, these emoticons ...


6

For most commerce sites, you do not want to lead the customer on or p*ss the customer off. Therefore, letting the customer know as early as possible is the best practice. If you can determine the location beforehand (e.g. using the methods that @skwotz outlined), then you can filter products accordingly. But sometimes sites cannot tell where the customer ...


6

Great question, really! The problem does not lie in Yes or No. But if the action is Positive or Negative. For example, "Are you sure to permanently delete System32?" Yes No "Are you sure you want to backup this photo?" Yes No As you can see here, the principle of good design is violated. If you specify Yes or No in the UI of your website/app, you're ...


5

In addition to the excellent response by @MichaelZuschlag, Linux uses an extra and effective approach (except Android, which implements a different method). When an action affects the system (e.g. installation of a new program, an upgrade of the core system, or a program upgrade from an unexpected source), the system asks for an administration password. ...


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