20

First things first I don't think UX can succeed in this scenario. A sprint is too short to do both the design and execution of the same feature. You should be out in front of things with the Product Manager defining the work before it ever becomes an engineering request. If you take that approach seriously (which I've never been able to realize 100%), you ...


14

This is an excellent question. I've seen decision processes fail at big companies (e.g. teams immobilized by consensus at Google) and small companies (e.g. ego-driven founder decisions at startups). Unfortunately most corporate training programs provide are designed to help UX and dev teams with vertical skills and resources, but very few corporate programs ...


11

This is a very broad question, for which this long answer is just the iceberg tip. Divide and conquer one thing which always failed is that we didn't define who has the final say, who can actually decide what to do and how. The agile answer to this is that everyone decides together. But this often fails miserably for the following reasons: There is too ...


9

I had very similar experiences to yours (and also been using JIRA for quite some time now). It goes: User stories are extremely limited It seems that every Agile team fails to understand or work with user stories. But for a good reason - a user story capture only a tiny fraction of the problem domain, here's just a couple of things user stories don't ...


6

You can follow the template like this fill-in-the-blanks example. Please add more details as needed into the story. User story: “As a [persona], I [want to], [so that].” I would say something like, "As a beginner user, I want to have an intuitive navigation and uncluttered appealing user interface, so that I can (for example)buy products quickly."


4

I think you are probably on the right track - Write a narrative, a step by step from one person's perspective from Logging in, to getting familiar with the portal, to finding what they need, and submitting data (course changes, questions) These are steps going across as a testable, demonstrable, potentially releasable plan. the way to divide it up into ...


4

You want to do this from the point of view of the user. Imagine one of the students is sitting down with you explaining what they would use the portal for. For example, a student might say something like this: "Those first couple days of classes are so confusing. I can never remember the exact times and classroom numbers of my classes. I wish I could just ...


4

As pointed out by Austin French's answer, the story writing typically is the responsibility of the Product Owner (PO) in "normal" agile. And in some projects, it's not uncommon for the PO to work with a technical lead to help define the stories so that it is easier for them to be translated into actionable work. As the question implies, where UX is ...


3

I would second Ren's answer in that anyone can write a user story and it's the PO's job to prioritise them. I think your question should be who is involved with story refinement. This is the process is getting a story to meet you DoR (Definition of Ready). Depending on how you work, ready may mean many things, but if the story impacts on UX in some way ...


3

Anyone can write user stories. It's the product owner's responsibility to make sure a product backlog of agile user stories exists, but that doesn’t mean that the product owner is the one who writes them. Over the course of a good agile project, you should expect to have user story examples written by each team member. Also, note that who writes a user ...


3

Generally, and I say this generically as your process and mileage may vary: The Product Owner should have the requirements: Perhaps a requirement is: We need a grid to show Customer Details Ideally, this will be groomed. Where a lead, the PO and stakeholders who are in the process can look at the requirements and define something more workable: We ...


3

Focus first on the user story. As it stands there is no user value inherent in the first story as it is written. Try rewriting it from the User's perspective (and consider that User's don't want to fill out forms but form fills are necessary in order to get something that they want). Attach a simple ux workflow created by ux in collab with dev. The other 2 ...


2

I had exactly the same problem during my last job. I was UX designer in a private company with SaaS products. The lean UX methods helped me a lot. I followed it with the team and organized a workshop to build personas in a lean UX way : You don't have public datas, your customers are not everybody, they are a specific king of people and you, as designer, ...


2

I do design studio sessions a fair bit — for what it's worth this would be my advice: I want to, of course, prevent groupthink, so should I even be participating as people might tend to see me as the expert and skew their answers towards my expectations (even though I'll address them as critical observers)? I think it's fine for designers to participate. ...


2

If your company is like ours it might still be relevant ;) "a UX team that would work ahead a few sprints to get things prepped for us to build fast." That is exactly what we did, when I was on a large project in a UX team of up to 6 people, and up to 4 development teams doing Scrum. Firstly a lot of the UX work - e.g. research of customer & users ...


2

The following may also help if you are truly agile: Design as a Kanban Stage Instead of making a card for UX/UI design vs. coding, we treat design as a stage in our Kanban boards: Open --> Ready for Design --> Ready for Coding --> In Progress --> Ready for UI Review --> Ready for Code Review --> etc. Note the "Ready for UI Review", which gives me the ...


2

First, there is no "right" answer to this. There are, however, many things teams have done to effectively address this and get even better UI/UX in the process. 1) Focus on experiences, not components When you have a user story that reads "As a user searching for products, I would like to filter the results to focus them on the items I'm looking for." The ...


2

This write-up is, in my opinion, the best intro to story mapping at agilevelocity.com, [2017-08-09]: Story Mapping 101, By David Hawks I did extensive search for various ways to understand story mapping. This blog post was the best source I could find. Here is a sum up of the strongest points, most relevant to answer the question: Initial story map draft ...


1

The item you provided doesn't really work as a story because it is not a capability or a need that the customer has. Most commonly, UI/UX is a part of delivering on a need. For example, if you said "As a DIY homeowner, I want a list of all tools for my landscaping projects so I can pick the one out I want even if I don't know what it is called." then part of ...


1

It would probably be ideal, but often user stories are created as part of an agile development process focused on creating a MVP that can be tested and updated before extensive research is involved. As with most questions here at UXSE, it depends on the context and in this case a YES or NO answer can be equally valid. Remember that you are allowed to make ...


1

This is probably THE scenario most of the designers already have been confronted with at least once in their career. Even if it appears to be a relatively small issue, I think it is not. What I found is that there are several topics that are not so clear on the first hand. Some or all of the following scenarios can be hidden in this issue: PM/PO has to be ...


1

If you have a sales team that interacts with your customers, talk to them. In a prior job our sales team provided a long list of customers for use to contact as test subjects. (In our case this was a list of people who had rated our company highly in previous surveys.) I then contacted them via email to ask for volunteers. The first time we did this we got ~...


1

There's 2 very excellent answers from @tohster and @Izhaki. I'm in a similar situation, on a team getting on board with SCRUM with a SaSS product where the people who've purchased the software aren't the primary users. So I just want to add my experiences on things I found that worked. Relate UX to Dollars In the SaSS (Software as A Service) field , ...


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