7

Perhaps in this situation a CSS text-overflow ellipsis may suffice. There are several additional possibilities for indicating the article summary is clickable. Check out the right hand side of https://svbtle.com/ . I am a big fan of making the entire summary clickable to expose the rest of the content, not just the title. For desktop designs you can change ...


3

If location is required/highly recommended for your website's functionality. e.g. perform a location specific search. Consider asking for the permission at the step where the geolocation info is actually required. It makes it clear why you're asking for this info and the user can decide whether they want to provide this or not. So for a store/branch ...


2

As long as your titles and images link to the full version of the article, it might not be the biggest deal to leave off a "Read More" link. That being said, it might be nice to have a visual separator between articles while scrolling vertically. I imagine the mobile experience would display: Title Image Intro Text Title Image Intro Text So if you had a "...


2

Pros: Wow effect As you scroll down along with the visuals you see large-font text that accompanies the visuals, thus you can skim read the story and then go back to read it from the beginning Shows off technical competence of whoever created this article The user can control the flow of the story Visuals help to memorize the material, especial if you are a ...


1

0. TL;DR Yes, the media queries are matching your purpose. Although I think it would be safer if you wrote the first media query as max-width: 900px and the other one as min-width: 901px. 1. Different devices You will surely need more breakpoints (media queries) in order to accommodate the most part of the mobile/tablet market share. The best way to find out ...


1

Yes, it's limited to size. What I think you mean is to have curated content or special pages based on certain specifications (geo, age, language, whatever), but adaptive design is related to size and/or device (for example gestures, touch enabled behaviors and such), which in turn affects size since different devices will have different screens. ...


1

As @nightning mentioned, Users should always be aware about why the additional data is needed (Location in your case) The Real Adaptive Design here But if your app or service is highly dependent on the location of the user, then I would suggest that you use Location detection by IP address services to grab the rough location of the user. Then as google &...


1

Progressive reduction does not sound like it plays well with muscle memory and for this reason I would avoid it. Other methods to deal with complexity are to use a 'natural language' interface, typing or saying commands instead of having a specific word or icon linked to an action you can then attach multiple words to an action. As opposed to an old command ...


1

Well, any standard menu is a classic example of progressive disclosure, where first you see just the title "File" and then you see the options it contains. "Progressive Reduction" is apparently a new name for what used to be called "Adaptive UI" or just "Personalization". The classic example here is MS Office 2003, where they did just what you described - if ...


1

You are thinking from the user experience. But perhaps over thinking. The user will want a mobile design on the phone and a desktop design at home. Users will search for the info they are looking for, and good ux makes that search easier. By predicting their behavior correctly, they will judge your interface as intuitive. You asked about best practices... ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible