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If not for the fact one must press play twice (with perhaps a bit of wait in between presses as the actual player control strip renders), then there wouldn't be a significant detriment to usability. The benefits of this approach are: custom background thumbnails can be supplied out-of-band from the video, i.e. the background thumbnail does not have to be ...


1

You already have VoiceOver so all you need is to learn the controls. As you are starting out a 'standard' screen reader is NVDA, which is free. Now I have never used on a Linux distro but I hope that this guide makes sense to you and will allow you to run it (as it Windows based). NVDA works at the computer level so it works with all Browsers (although it ...


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I had similar problem before: there was a control to select a person who will sign documents, but not any person is allowed to sign and we had to choose either: person should not be presented in list person should be in list but disabled person should be selectable + validation We tried all those options. person was not presented in list users start to ...


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Adding to chrisbergr's comment, why not use colour and/or pattern to reinforce the difference between read only tags and the rest? A metalic or stone colour and pattern could reflect the immutable nature of read only tags. I'm not sure why this Question is tagged with Accessibility, and your statement "Pro is accessibility (no need to make opaque or greyed ...


1

What level of Accessibility are you going for? A lot of apps "do Accessibility" but fail to achieve a WCAG 2.0 level AA. It is possible to provide buttons and other widgets that get picked up by Screen Readers, and thus assist Screen Readers in achieving an Accessible app, but aren't seen by the average User. You can also detect whether a Screen Reader is ...


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You should not use <title> here. The title should be used to describe the image, if that makes sense for someone that can't see the image. In this case, it is obvious that the icon itself doesn't need any description. But the message it brings to people who can see it, is what you should focus on. When the image isn't visible (for either a human or ...


2

If there is no value in describing the image then there is no value in using title. You do not need to title (or alt) every image just because it's there. (Note that alt is a required attribute so alt="" would be appropriate.) Use such things to describe an image to a person who is unable to view the image for any reason. Whether sight impaired or the image ...


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There isn't a rule for how much the colour should change for a hovered state. However it should still have a contrast ratio of 4.5:1 minimum for small text and 3:1 for large text. The button must still maintain a 3:1 minimum contrast ratio with it's surroundings as well. With that being said there are a few best practices to follow:- Ensure you set the ...


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The <title> should be used as if it were an alt tag, describing the item for screen reader users as if it was just a .png or similar. I answered a similar question on Stack Overflow explaining how to think of the <title> and <description> elements (among other things, first couple of paragraphs are most relevant to you.)


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As long as the fill or outline is clearly visible and adheres to whatever contrast standard you wish to adhere to then the only real difference between the two fields is which looks better in your design. I tend to use filled when you need to draw attention to one or two inputs in a dense design as they have slightly more visual prominence especially on ...


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As things stand today in Stack Exchange, for audio screen reader users they never hear about the coloured (colored) icon because it is tagged aria-hidden="true". However, not all visually deficient users use screen readers (i.e. 8% of males have red/green blindness). Also bear in mind that this is not exclusively an accessibility issue - absolutely ...


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Short Answer The principles for displaying hidden content that you describe work for both a dropdown and for a menu. If you implement all of the same accessibility features for the toggle part (not the content of the 'dropdown' / 'menu' content) then you should have a pretty good accessible menu. Long Answer / Things to consider Without seeing the code ...


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There is no major problem here that needs addressing I'm glad people are thinking about accessibility issues for things like this, it's important to make websites accessible, but I'm not sure why you don't include the most common form of colourblindness in your images. Viewed under Deuteranopia and Protanopia (i.e. red-green colourblindness) the colours are ...


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I offered an answer on or.meta.se June 11 2019, intended for sighted persons. It wouldn't be difficult to modify it to work for color blindness. My question there has a link pointing to my meta.se answer. There I explain that different shaped badges are used on sites such as Music.se and Graphic Design.se: In addition to different shapes it's also possible ...


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I just noticed that Graphic Design SE has badges in distinctive shapes. https://graphicdesign.stackexchange.com/help/badges So, I made a mock-up along the lines and increased the color contrast. now its clearly visible against a white background and meets the non-text contrast guidelines. Graphic Design SE Badges:


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If you want to convey priority of one item over another then there are two obvious different approaches to take; Size Quantity If one thing is 'bigger' than the other than it takes more priority over the others. Likewise if there are more of one thing than another then that theoretically makes it more desirable. Size Quantity While the size option is ...


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The main information the color conveys isn't just that there are different types, but that the types have varying levels of difficulty. The bronze < silver < gold metaphor has been used for ages, so any new symbols should try to convey that sense of escalation. Edit: Thanks to the comments from GammaGames and Woodrow Barlow, here is a smaller ...


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It is quite hard but I am thinking that you could use a Cup for gold, a medal for silver and a coin for bronze. They might convey importance hierarchy.


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If you want to just check the visual side of accessibility (seeing that your examples aren't interactive prototypes, so they can't be tested for accessibility fully), you could go to WCAG 2.1, for example to see if colors and sizes are good enough. Target sizes For sizes, to achieve level "AAA" (which, arguably, means the buttons have good accessibility) ...


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I am a lefty and having the scroll bar on the right drives me crazy. I have to move my mouse positioned on the left side of my desk across the screen to get to my scroll bar. Why not use the scroll wheel on the mouse, you say? Because when touching the left side your screen you will not have any free space for scrolling. Touching usually results in ...


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On Android: a Button should look like a Button, which has affordances to hint that it is a button and thus clickable. list items in Android are expected to be clickable by default. To be honest, this is very shallow stuff to get hitched on. Consider long-presses on Android, there are no affordances for that yet long-press and CAB is really the right way to ...


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This is essentially the same as the answer above by @Mohammed Yaseen Ganai, but I felt that some more explanation was in order to really help you understand the suggestion. The most important thing here is not breaking convention unnecessarily - there already exist UI elements to do exactly what you want to do: Radios and Checkboxes. Radio buttons Radio ...


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Switches are generally used when there are only one or two options. In this case, there a four options so checkboxes would work better. The options could be made more user-friendly and understandable with the addition of a verb: Allow multiple valid answers [checkbox] Allow multiple attempts [checkbox] Shuffle questions [checkbox] Shuffle answers [...


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Standard behaviour for a switch is when the action takes effect instantly, a checkbox takes effect after a submit button is pressed. I suggest you change the options you have for multiple attempts etc to checkboxes. Then move down the option for multiple answers to just above where you select the correct answer, here a switch makes sense. Group things that ...


3

Some thoughts - How about having an input field show up once the user uploads the picture and the thumbnail loads? The input field can have the label, "Image Description. Without having to understand much about accessibility explicitly, users will tend to fill this in more easily compared to explaining what alt is about. You can have a tooltip for this ...


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It is clear, but it seems a too long. People are lazy, so they will only scan that label, and then there is a chance that they won't understand. They will then have to read it with attention, that will annoy your users a lite. Maybe: "Provide description for visually impaired users." The correct placement and designing proper user interaction is a key to ...


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