161

Use icons, they communicate a lot more than colours alone. If you must use colours, simply colour the icons.


150

The main information the color conveys isn't just that there are different types, but that the types have varying levels of difficulty. The bronze < silver < gold metaphor has been used for ages, so any new symbols should try to convey that sense of escalation. Edit: Thanks to the comments from GammaGames and Woodrow Barlow, here is a smaller ...


111

As pointed out in comments and other answers, pointer trails were originally "intended for" and "especially useful if you [were] using a liquid crystal display (LCD) screen" in Windows 3.1. LCD monitors at the time were mostly passive-matrix, whose typically slower response times meant your cursor didn't have time to get redrawn as it moved across the ...


103

There is no problem to work as a UX/UI designer, as choosing color is just a minor part of the usability process. There are lots of other activities that the UX-er should do, like usability testing, checking analytics, conducting A/B tests, writing reports. Choosing color is more like visual designers work. People often are confused between the two ...


90

Great question! This is an good case for microinteraction design. Microinteraction objectives In descending order of priority: Provide clear affordance for user to place card/wallet on reader Provide clear feedback that the user should hold the card on the reader until an outcome. Since this is public transportation, provide blind- and deaf- friendly ...


66

The original purpose of the "mouse trails" feature, according to the Windows 3.1 documentation, was to make the mouse easier to track on the very-high-latency LCD panels used in early laptops, by ensuring that the pointer was drawn in each position for at least a full refresh cycle of the screen. It turns out that it also makes the mouse easier to follow/...


60

No - there is no "friendly font" for all. Dyslexia is not a hard and fast condition. Different people who are dyslexic will exhibit differently. As a result a particular font that helps one individual does not necessarily help another. io9.com actually has a recent article which cited several studies on the subject: A Special Font to Help Dyslexics? More ...


57

I've been doing front-end work for a decade, and I have deuteranopia or deuteranomaly (red-green color blindness). It has never been a problem. I largely rely on color codes and location/proximity on color picker UIs to identify colors. When doing a design from scratch, I will often look at pre-existing palettes for inspiration. I will also use an ...


56

No, it would seem not, as W3C states 1.4.3 Contrast (Minimum): The visual presentation of text and images of text has a contrast ratio of at least 4.5:1, except for the following: Large Text: Large-scale text and images of large-scale text have a contrast ratio of at least 3:1; Incidental: Text or images of text that are part of an inactive user ...


55

If you want to convey priority of one item over another then there are two obvious different approaches to take; Size Quantity If one thing is 'bigger' than the other than it takes more priority over the others. Likewise if there are more of one thing than another then that theoretically makes it more desirable. Size Quantity While the size option is ...


51

Well for your example of alt text just show him that there are many more benefits than accessibility. http://www.learnwebdevelopment.com/2011/01/advantages-to-adding-alt-tags-to-images/ Increases Traffic Higher SEO Rankings Safety Rules All of the reasons shown in this link (first link I found on google) are advantages that will increase ...


51

I do work on a professional webapp for visually impaired, screen reader users. We do user testing regularly, and this has been raised many times during user test sessions that disabled elements that are required for completing a step/ flow (or are just generally too important to be missed) should be focusable with TAB key. If disabled buttons are not ...


43

Wrap the label around the checkbox. This makes it much easier to click the button. If the label is separate from the control, then there is often a non-clickable gap between them. <input id="click-me" name="click-me" type="checkbox"/> <label for="click-me"> Click me </label> download bmml source – Wireframes created with ...


40

Yes there is a formula. I wrote an article on high contrast colours recently that charts the variation of black or white (actually off-white #f0f0f0 and off-black #101010) as the foreground colour with the highest contrast ratio, for ranges of background colours. The contrast ratio is calculated as (L1 + 0.05) / (L2 + 0.05), where L1 is the: relative ...


40

I just noticed that Graphic Design SE has badges in distinctive shapes. https://graphicdesign.stackexchange.com/help/badges So, I made a mock-up along the lines and increased the color contrast. now its clearly visible against a white background and meets the non-text contrast guidelines. Graphic Design SE Badges:


38

No. Best practice is not to have a separate screen-reader version of the site. Suggesting you should have a screen-reader version of the site infers that your main site won't be. Which doesn't really make any sense, because a non-screen-reader optimised site would be one not built to proper HTML web standards. And why would you intentionally build a non-...


37

Italics are a known problem for some people with dyslexia and the general advice has been to avoid italics (particularly large blocks of italic text) and instead use bold for emphasis. The British Dyslexia Association says: Avoid underlining and italics: these tend to make the text appear to run together. Use bold instead. UX Movement touches on this ...


36

Technically this would fall under "unexpected behaviour" for new users or people using a screen reader (where your controls may impact their usage when in "forms mode" as arrow keys are used heavily by screen reader users). A simple solve would be a well described option checkbox / toggle button at the top of the form that saves a user ...


33

As the other answers said, the colours themselves may pose a problem if the hues aren't distinguishable easily. The clearest solution to this is to combine the colours with a shape, so full-vision people can still scan quickly by colour but stopping to look for a second will also easily show the idea. Something like: download bmml source – Wireframes ...


32

A good example to consider would be the iBooks app in iOS which allows users to enable the dark theme automatically depending on the light sensor detection. However as PS86 rightly pointed out, don't build this automatically into the system but enable the user to set as a desired parameter. To quote this article, the iBooks app enables this by an option ...


31

The UK plug uses 3 wires -- two of solid colour, and a third that is 2-coloured in a stripe pattern. The colours are chosen so that each wire can be identified by colour blind persons. Here is what the configuration looks to people with colour blindness: From MrReid: Under the IEC 60446 standard only black, brown, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, violet,...


29

This conclusions from Michael Hughes might be helpful for you to decide when to include a screenshot and when not to: So where does this leave me? I am going to be more open to including screen shots where they do the following: Help reassure the user that where they are in the UI is the right place to be Help call attention to a specific ...


27

It's not the end of the world if you skip headings in this manner because users will most likely still find the content, but it does go against the general structure of the content and adds a bit of a barrier to users accessing using assistive technologies. One way to look at it is to think of a trio of military chaps in a room; a General, a Sargent, and a ...


27

This is where I'd argue that UX isn't the one to fix this. All they can do is apply duct tape and band aids to a poorly implemented technology. Fix the technology. It simply shouldn't take 3 seconds to read an RFID chip. On top of that, asking each person to wait 3 seconds to pass through seems like a logistical nightmare for crowd management. This is ...


27

People with Parkinson Disease (or PD as it's also known) need special considerations as you correctly figured. However, keep in mind that most of those considerations are covered by special peripherals rather than specific UI. As a matter of fact, just following common WAI- ARIA guidelines is more than enough. Keep in mind that, like many people with ...


27

It is quite hard but I am thinking that you could use a Cup for gold, a medal for silver and a coin for bronze. They might convey importance hierarchy.


27

If you want sex just say it If you want sex just say it - You should strive to convey information in the clearest way possible, when possible. < 2.1 miles is < clear than less than 2.1 miles. In the form < 2.1 miles people could infer < as "look left". < ≠ <= Note that less than 2.1 miles is not the same as 2.1 miles or less - the ...


27

Would patterns work for your use case? You could keep the shape, size, position and orientation the same for each one and have a 'colour blindness mode' where instead of colours to distinguish the items you use patterns. For example blue could be parallel lines, red could be a pattern of dots, yellow could be a cross-hatch and green could be zig-zagged lines ...


25

Limitations are limiting Everyone here is very nice, but they're dodging one important point: Being a color-blind UXD will limit your ability to be an all-in-one product designer. Everyone has their limits. Unlike you, I do not have a solid engineering background. I work closely with a software architect throughout the discovery phase of a product or ...


25

You already answered your own question. Keyboard/screen-reader users will need to step out of the search field when it was focused automatically to make use of other ways to navigate. Also on mobile, Google doesn't auto focus on the input field. The reason is simply to not directly popup a keyboard since that would be annoying. If you want to make your main ...


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