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Results tagged with Search options answers only user 1740

Semantic structure of information within a website, desktop application etc.

2
votes
There are some fundamental flaws with the implementation of headers in the HTML spec. They were created back when HTML was pretty much seen as a document structure, rather than any sort of site struct …
answered Sep 30 '10 by DA01
9
votes
While hundreds is likely a bit much, the answer tends to be 'as much as you need and not more'. There's the old myth of 5-7, though that's not applicable at all to menus: http://uxmyths.com/post/931 …
answered Jun 21 '11 by DA01
0
votes
The key factor here is how likely individuals would end up viewing more than one section of the site. If many users will likely encounter the duplicated content, then it's likely confusing and not mu …
answered Jan 15 '15 by DA01
1
vote
There's some confusion in assuming that Tufte is for complexity. He's for information fidelity, not necessarily density. He's a huge proponent of 'less is more' as well, in that he is very much known …
answered May 9 '13 by DA01
1
vote
No research, but I think you might be asking the wrong question. The goal of creating a properly indexable site for google so that people can do a search and find the right page on your site is a grea …
answered Dec 7 '11 by DA01
3
votes
In terms of making wireframes accessibility documents, this is not what wireframes are for! Other things that wireframes are not designed to be: content repositories interaction design specificatio …
answered Jul 1 '13 by DA01
1
vote
No. Breadcrumbs are navigation. As such, a user has the expectation that each node is a page (or view) that they can get to by selecting it. The example you provided (which was good) is BestBuy.com …
answered Mar 4 '14 by DA01
0
votes
There's two ways to look at it (well, I'm sure dozens of ways, but let's stick with two): Do what Amazon does. They've already figured this all out. Go with the more minimal solution as, afterall, t …
answered Dec 11 '15 by DA01
5
votes
As tools (software and hardware) increase in speed, the value of search begins to eclipse the value of a folder structure as a way to find a file. On my PC, my MacBook, and my phone, it's simply fas …
answered Jun 30 '15 by DA01
0
votes
Titles are vague and roles often as well. The key is that UX work is being done. Whether it's someone with an IA title, a UX title, an interactive designer title, etc, or any combination thereof is l …
answered Jan 31 '14 by DA01
0
votes
First, we need to define IA. Are you asking specifically about Information Architecture, or user experience in general? IA is a bit of a fuzzy term. Some use it to refer to the site map and content m …
answered Feb 24 '12 by DA01
0
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Wireframes should rarely be presented to clients. Wireframes are an important internal tool for UX to build the product, but not a useful way to communicate details with clients. Yes, that's a broad …
answered May 2 '12 by DA01
0
votes
There's no rule here. In general, though, if you're writing paragraphs, then you're likely not 'getting to the point' as fast as typically warranted via a bulleted list. As for when to use ordered vs …
answered Jan 20 '15 by DA01
0
votes
EDIT: I agree with Bryan's presentation. Wireframes and Prototypes are terrible client deliverables as they are bloated and nearly always out of date/sync. I don't know if I agree that the XML base …
answered May 15 '12 by DA01