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I have a newsfeed that is filtered by the current page it is placed in. This newsfeed needs an navigation option to access the overview page.

Here's the basic control: enter image description here

First Approach: enter image description here

Second Approach: enter image description here

The client likes the second version more (it's based on his pen&paper prototype), but from a ux view the first is superior since it's

  • faster accessible
  • always at the same position
  • can not be mistaken for the "LOAD MORE" functionality

I'm currently deciding if I should try to convince the client or just leave it be (in the end the client always gets what he wants (or deserves..).

Can you think of better solutions or some minor or major disadvantages I am overlooking?

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    An often-overlooked advantage of rapid testing techniques is that it gives you influence. It sounds like you are convinced that your design is correct. You have a hypothesis. Test it with a few users. If you prove yourself wrong (but in this case, you probably won't) then fine. If you prove yourself right, then great. If the results are incolnclusive, you still have gained influence with the client by showing you can set up the correct process and understand your craft well. Do some guerilla testing. – jackiemb Aug 10 '16 at 16:58
  • @jackiemb can't agree more, but sadly I have neither the budget nor the channel to the end user.. – Mx. Aug 10 '16 at 17:50
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    You don't need a budget for informal user testing. Do it with the office cleaner, the security guard, the salespeople in the office next door. Sit in the canteen with a sign above your head (yes I really have). Test the prototype you have posted here with 5 users. Just do it! – jackiemb Aug 10 '16 at 18:15
  • it's not quite clear to me what the feed overview link / button is actually FOR. – Yvonne Aburrow Dec 8 '17 at 9:46
  • What does the feed overview do? Do you have a screenshot of that screen? – Stacy H Dec 9 '17 at 16:44
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In general, I would suggest you avoid the color red for the "load more" button, because thanks to common design patterns, the users have learned to understand red buttons with destructive actions like deleting, uninstalling, etc.

If you must go with your second approach, please keep in mind that buttons are meant for actions. So it makes sense for "load more", but not for "feedoverview". Maybe you'd rename it into "show overview". You can also add different colors and/or icons to both buttons to provide the users a better possibility to distinguish them.

But I would highly suggest you to work on your first approach. Rename it into "show overview", make it a button and play with the position. Maybe align it to the right edge of the headline, like WordPress is doing it into their backend. Maybe you'd implement a "auto-load-more" function in the future, so the overview button on the bottom would never be visible.

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option

I was thinking about solution for you and client

and thanks for @chrisbergr for a name it "show overview". I think the text with underline makes it less important than "load more" which is the main action. and it still clear to see because it's centered under load more. that is my opinion.

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