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This would be my 2nd question in UX Stackexchange to clarify my understanding. I've been developing Persona for sometime but this is my first time to collaborate UX with Marketing Team. I found out that Marketing do create persona based on Demography, which is something that I didn't do with creating Persona in UX.

Does Design Persona is a more detailed version to Marketing Persona or they're different?

When we're developing product, I don't believe that having 2 different persona created by 2 different division should collide while the goal is to create 1 product.

e.g. What's the bigger workflow when we're developing product? should it start with marketing's persona then we use that persona to create a more detailed Design persona? or should we just use Marketing Persona (which is based on my understanding isn't really how UX is done)? or the process really different and doesn't link together?

  • IMHO, you're essentially correct in your assumption, just that the marketing persona is a sub-set of the whole persona – Devin Jul 12 '16 at 18:34
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UX personas aren't necessarily extensions of marketing personas. They're used for different purposes, composed of different pieces, and they may even represent different people. In some circumstances the most practical thing might be to have a single, unified set, but in some organizations that's neither necessary nor practical.

(UX) design personas help designers empathize with real users by condensing real user data into memorable proxies. Demographic information isn't enough; designers need to consider the user's goals (both overarching goals as well as temporary ones they set as they progress through a scenario), context(s), and certain traits that relate directly to the design, such as technological expertise, subject-matter understanding level, or perhaps physical/cognitive limitations.

Since marketing is targeted toward people who buy products—which may or may not be the same people who use them—their personas focus more on demographics, purchasing habits, values, and other information that helps the marketing team develop their strategies.

So, if the people who are buying the product are always the same people using it, it may make sense to have a single set of personas and to map out the customer's journey from introduction, to purchase, to the time they throw the product away. On the other hand, it may be more practical to keep two sets of personas, especially if the people buying aren't the ones using the product. (e.g. children's toys/games, enterprise software, or products for industries like healthcare)

Either way, the goal should be to create personas that will help the UX team do their work, without sacrificing the effectiveness of the marketing team's personas.

  • I think they have to be the same. Elie suggest the right “When we’re developing product, I don’t believe that having 2 different persona created by 2 different division should collide while the goal is to create 1 product.” The marketing is only effektive if they have users who can reach their goals with the promoted product. – Peter Jul 12 '16 at 8:59
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    The main point I'm trying to make, and the answer to Elie's question, is that no, UX personas aren't necessarily extensions of marketing personas. They're used for different purposes, composed of different pieces, and they may even represent different people. (Buyers vs. users.) Some organizations might be able to make them the same but I don't think that's practical in all cases. I'll edit the answer to make that point a little more clearly. Thanks. – Nate Green Jul 12 '16 at 12:51
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    @NateGreen, I think you're correct in some way, but I'd argue some of your points. For example, in companies working in an Agile environment, you'll usually find that the UX persona takes a condensed set of the marketing persona. This is just an example, there are many ways in which both personas not only interact, but in fact they're the same persona (because they are!). the OP's demographic example is just a dimension, there are many many different dimensions to measure from a marketing POV, and they should be considered when creating an UX persona. +1 anyways for a thorough answer :) – Devin Jul 12 '16 at 18:32
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    @Devin Thanks! Yeah, I don't want to downplay the fact that they could/should be the same (maybe I have minimized that too much?) but I also know first-hand that users and buyers aren't always the same people. – Nate Green Jul 12 '16 at 19:27
  • @Devin: I actually have the same thought, I personally assume that there are users who also buyer, and in UX Persona we're working on Primary and Secondary as well as the Third persona which are the person who is not the target of the design (at all!) to create the boundary. But of course there are user who are not directly affected by the system but could potentially have indirect impact to the system, this is where I thought the marketing persona could help creating this type of persona (potential buyer) – Elie Jul 13 '16 at 1:36

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