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I've been asked by my boss to find out "the best" way to phrase the intro to cross-linked content (at the bottom of the page).

What I know that he doesn't is there isn't necessarily a "best" way (it's a tough thing to search, but I've not found any actual studies or tests done on it). But maybe you know something that I don't!

Here is a list I have brainstormed:

[Our current phrasing] You'll also like:

Enjoying this content? You may also enjoy:

Recommended for you:

People Who Liked This Content Also Liked:

What do others watch after watching this webcast?

Your personalized recommendations:

closed as primarily opinion-based by Devin, msp, JohnGB Apr 28 '16 at 7:58

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • This question came up in the close vote queue as being potentially opinion-based. I vote to leave it open because it's likely that someone has done some testing around the wording for this common feature. Questions about wording tend to get a lot of subjective answers but that doesn't mean the question itself is opinion-based; I support downvoting opinion-based answers rather than closing this question. – Graham Herrli Apr 28 '16 at 6:56
  • Thank you. This is my first time posting, and my wording may not have been as good as it could have been. I'm legitimately interested in actual user testing that may have been done, but was unable to uncover any on my own, so was reaching out for possible information. – Jenny Chisnell Apr 29 '16 at 13:29
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Netflix does with well with specifics in the title, like:

Because you watched Breaking Bad

This feels really catered to the user and draws attention - the recommendations for which feel implicitly justified. It's also likely concise.

Regardless of what you choose, it may be the case that your boss wants to see how you think and approach a problem more than anything. Are you going to go elaborate and conduct A/B tests? Or on the other end of the spectrum, indicate that there could be bigger fish to fry and recommend an approach that another successful platform uses?

  • -1 because this answer suggests yet another option, but without providing any evidence that it actually performs better. – Graham Herrli Apr 28 '16 at 6:51
  • Would you please note the area where evidence is explicitly required? Sorry, I didn't see that in the Help section or in OP's question. – bphilipnyc Apr 28 '16 at 12:20
  • It's also an answer with reasoning albeit from personal experience. I don't understand the rationale. Reference: meta.ux.stackexchange.com/questions/1859/… – bphilipnyc Apr 28 '16 at 12:36
  • I appreciate your comments! Good thoughts. I presented a list of options (brainstormed or based on what others use) for my boss and a couple coworkers to vote on as a team. Perhaps there'll be support for some A/B testing of the top picks. – Jenny Chisnell Apr 28 '16 at 15:44
  • When a web site mentions what I did in the past I find that very creepy. If I go to the library, no one rushes up and says, "Last time you were here, you ..." I would not want that IRL, or in any other way. Maybe I got what I wanted last time, and now I want something else? If that is the expectation, then what I did "last time" is completely a wrong start. If your site succeeds in giving you something you want, it should then have no idea what you want next. – user67695 Oct 10 '17 at 14:09
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I also like the Netflix approach. They also show "Titles related to X" where X is something the viewer has watched previously.

What makes this work well for Netflix though is how their algorithms select the content being suggested. The algorithm uses a combination of the user's viewing history and any ratings they've given to the content they've watched.

From your question, I think you definitely do need to change your current phrase, because You'll also like is rather presumptuous.

If it was me, I'd use something not too wordy. My preference would be "Suggested for you", but at the end of the day some of your other options are fine too. The main thing is that the user understands what you're doing and that it comes across as a suggestion or recommendation.

  • -1 because this answer suggests yet another option, but without providing any evidence that it actually performs better. – Graham Herrli Apr 28 '16 at 6:51
  • Well, the question did ask for "Your personalised recommendations:" and that's what I gave. But I do appreciate you giving a reason for the down vote. :) – Monomeeth Apr 28 '16 at 7:58

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