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On all my pages, I have the logo in the top left corner. As is consistent with most sites online, it links back to the homepage.

However, I need to decide between one of two things:

  1. Have the link apply on the homepage which links to the homepage (itself). This could cause redirection to the page they are on - which is unnecessary, but it would be more consistent.

  2. Don't link the icon back to the home page on the home page. This would avoid unnecessary redirection, but causes consistency issues.

Each is as easy to implement as the other.

marked as duplicate by Mayo, Community Mar 3 '16 at 19:10

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  • Given the scenario, what would be the result if someone tried to click on the icon (which is your logo?). I suggest that you might need to modify the hover and click behaviour for the home page as well, and that will help with the consistency issues so that users are not frustrated or confused when they do click on it. – Michael Lai Mar 3 '16 at 2:17
  • @MichaelLai This is a mobile site so hover isn't an action really. – Tim Mar 3 '16 at 11:39
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There is no reason to not implement 1). If you have dynamic content, there is a benefit to let users reload. Even if not, there is no benefit to change the behaviour.

Look at Facebook, Amazon, Twitter. They all do 1).

  • From my experience, this is exaclty what I would do. Users become familiar with the "home button" going "home" and the "logo" going "home" there is no need to complicate it. Different users expect logos to navigate, others look for the home button. I would agree with implementing option 1. – stradled Mar 3 '16 at 9:21
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As most questions, it depends. If you're working on a back end based system, you probably should provide a full reload 1).

But if you have a front end MVC based system, you probably just want to refresh the main data. So if you have a list of articles or related, just reload that part. (somewhere between 1 and 2)

I personally tend to always use "1)", for the consistency issue you stated. Even stack exchange uses "1)" that should be a good clue. For most questions, always take a look at the big brands (Facebook, Google, Twitter, Ebay) and what they do. Especially the social media sites have the best UX developers there are. They often set the trends.

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There are actually a couple more options:

  1. Assuming you have a small logo with a home link on the sub-pages —positioned top left for example — hide that logo on the home page, and put in a larger, centered “banner” logo that has no home link in it — that way you have really distinguished the home page from the other pages, and if the user is navigating up the hierarchy from sub-pages, when the small logo disappears and a large centered logo appears, I think that says “top” really well

  2. You can capture the home page logo link with JavaScript and when it is activated, offer the user a popup navigation menu. For example, you could show them links to your social pages, making them conceptually up the hierarchy from your home page. Or you could show them links to your product pages, conceptually using the home page logo to reveal the company’s products. Or you could use the home page logo link as a contact link, popping up “Contact [logo name]? Cancel/OK.” Or at the very least, popup “Reload page? Cancel/OK.”

Option 3 is the one I use the most. It not only feels right to me as I use it, it is also bigger and better branding.

I would definitely encourage you not to just do what “everybody” does. The Web is still evolving. There was a time when a 404 page just literally said “404 Error” and that was it. The user was supposed to type a URL into the address bar to continue. Everybody did that. Now we typically give the user some explanation of what just happened and some navigation options. So the fact that a lot of sites just reload the page on a home page logo link is not really evidence that it is the best thing to do for the user. The user has a Reload button in their browser already if they want to reload. I don’t think many users use the home page logo as a reload button anyway. I think they just don’t know they are on the home page. So in a way, a home page logo link activation is sort of like a 404. So just reloading may be a missed opportunity to both help the user go forward and to drive them to social pages or product pages.

The fact that you asked this question suggests you weren’t really happy with the status quo, so in that case it may be rewarding for you to explore some other options.

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