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I am developing an internal support request form.

In order to capture useful information, I've divided the request types in four categories. (Say A, B, C and D)

On selecting an option a form opens which is different for all four request types.

My problem is about presenting request type selection right on the homepage.

A mockup below

enter image description here

Being an internal tool, homepage would not have anything more than a company banner and some background.

I am not sure what is the best way to present this choice in terms of user experience and looks.

I've considered using buttons and drop down menu but can't figure what to use and why.

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If I understand the question correctly, and using the example of your mockup:

  • you're wondering the best way to present the user with the choices of Apps, Games, Movies, Books and Newspapers?
  • users can only submit one form at a time (i.e. they can't select 'Books' and 'Newspapers' and submit both together.

Have you considered using tabs instead? Assuming you don't have too many choices this is quite effective. I would also have them in alphanumeric order.

The homepage background would be identical regardless of the tab chosen and you could highlight the selected tab in some way (change in size, colour, etc).

Another possible solution

If you have lots of choices, and many of them are phrases rather than one or two-word options, you could use the tabs instead as headers for your four categories.

Under each tab you'd list the most popular choices (or all of them if it's not too many). Make the tabs and choices link to the relevant form. If you have too many choices, clicking on the tab would take you to the full list of choices for that category instead of directly to the form.

Below is a mockup to better explain what I mean.

Forms Menu Home Page

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  • Most of my choices are not one or two word but they are small phrases like "problem with windows", "problem with mac", "need a new hardware" etc.. I don't think they would really look good as tabs – pun Feb 8 '16 at 1:25
  • Agreed. Can you provide some more detail? For example, are there a lot of choices? – Monomeeth Feb 8 '16 at 1:35
  • On the homepage ? No. There are only four choices. But other forms would have about 5 to 6 input fields – pun Feb 8 '16 at 1:58
  • Ok, so, are there only four forms (one for each category)? Or, are there lots of forms for each category? – Monomeeth Feb 8 '16 at 2:02
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    I just meant if you had lots of options (being for internal support) that you'd only list the most commonly requested inputs (e.g. 'password resets' may be the number support query, so you'd have that listed on the main home page). In your case with only 5 or 6 inputs per category, I'd just list them all under their respective categories. That way, when the user goes to the main page, they can see the four tabs and all their options without any further input until they select something.Effectively, the main page just contains a lot of links, all of which go to one of four forms. – Monomeeth Feb 8 '16 at 4:37
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Check my solution... some simple changes. Task flow

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  • Certainly a different angle but seems like Monomeeth's answer makes more sence – pun Feb 8 '16 at 8:20
  • I was trying to give a form's design solution. I considered that the forms are a part a bigger system. The form itself can be big. You can have logs or past requests to avoid repetition of creating same request again and again. Editing past request. finding a request. I also considered that a support guy will use this application and helping out the customer on phone, so he should easily change the form without canceling. – Kaustav Mukhopadhyay Feb 8 '16 at 9:00

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