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I'm building an online community about neighborhoods. There will be useful informations about neighborhood such as pharmacies, average rent price, educational status of people etc. That leads to finding best neighborhood for your own needs.

Basically web site like NomadList's but for neighborhoods

I need user input about some informational data from people. Mostly yes/no questions but need to be answered by people living in that area or from a page of neighborhood anonymously.

  • Do you feel secure at home?
  • Do you feel secure at outside?
  • Is internet connection fast?
  • Is there any parking problems?
  • ...

What is the best way to collect data from users?

  1. Randomly popping up dialog (annoying?)
  2. Some small container in right-bottom corner?
  3. A page displaying all questions, can be sent independently?

I believe asking questions is annoying for users, but this is only way to collect data.

Is there any best practices for that?

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    I wont comment on the best way to prompt them because I do not know but I will say, you will need to provide incentive. This sounds like an app for people looking to move into a new neighborhood, why would people already living in it want to take the time to answer your questions. Whether it be the incentive of "bringing the right people into your community" or an actual reward they will need some push, this will make any questionnaire prompt seem much less annoying. – DasBeasto Jan 19 '16 at 15:35
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I suggest to make it less intrusive. I guess you don't need to get answers to all your questions immediately, but rather your would like to collect statistics. Then you may do the following:

  • Make your questions in the form of statements and let users agree/disagree
  • Display the questions one at a time in the less used area of your website/app.
  • Once a user responds to one of the questions, show the next one.

Here is an example:

enter image description here

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  • Thanks, that is an option i should consider. I believe both placement of question and "aggree/disagree" options are important here. Instead of yes/no, should i use agree/disagree as wording? – Onur Özkan Jan 20 '16 at 5:13
  • what do you think about this? mixing up with personas? imgur.com/rDYLg3H – Onur Özkan Jan 20 '16 at 5:39
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    If you ask a question then you may use yes/no, but when you make a statement people may agree or disagree with it. I suggested making a statement because a question feels more soliciting, than a statement. When I'm asked something, I know that somebody wants something from me. If I see a statement, I can feel strong about it (agree or disagree) or feel nothing. But I don't feel I'm being pulled into something.I think it's a fine difference and some people may disagree, but this what I think about it. – mikryz Jan 20 '16 at 6:57
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    As for your mockup, I think adding user's name is way too pushy. I would use a neutral title ("What's your neighborhood/area like?", "Share your opinion") and then let people either answer a question with yes/no or agree/disagree with a statement. You may highlight the area if you like it to be more noticeable. – mikryz Jan 20 '16 at 7:01
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If incentivising users as Das said (and I agree too) is not what you are looking at, you can explore "gamifying" your questionnaire. Take a look at this example. Regardless of which display method you choose, the content should be engaging so that users are more compelled to read and interact with it. Personally I would create a separate page for collecting information, so that it doesn't seem too intrusive.

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  • I never thought on Gamification, i think its probably the most fun/easy way to get input. Maybe i can mix with second option i stated, personas ask for input to user "why should i move here?" kinda questions? – Onur Özkan Jan 19 '16 at 18:01
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I would suggest a quick "setup" questionnaire during 1st use. Something like:

Welcome to "NeighbourhoodList". You are currently in [geolocation:"XYZ"], please help us rate this neighbourhood by answering a few quick questions... yes/no, yes/no... Done!

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