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I'm designing software that's being designed with multiple tiers. Each tier has a specified amount of storage and specified number of actions an account can take each month. The issue is that we do not yet have a mechanism to enforce the limits so if a user goes over their monthly limit they can just keep adding files and taking actions. We do plan on having an enforcement mechanism in the future but there is no date on the calendar.

Does anybody have any data that suggests that this can erode the trust the user has in a product, even if they are technically getting more than they were promised? Any data on this or similar circumstances is appreciated.

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If users sign up without knowing the limits and you suddenly enforce them, notified or not, people will be upset. The best thing to do is inform them up front, wether you can enforce it or not.

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    Exactly. You can also treat this as a "fake door" to test whether limits are meaningful for your user group. – nightning Nov 10 '15 at 22:44
  • Indeed reliability is what we are all seeking in other people or machines. Be truthful. Don't let your users wonder just because you need a revise in your project management :) – George Pligoropoulos Nov 22 '15 at 19:29
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i"d say 1 of the two:

1: dont state the limit at all.

When you finally can enforce,
warn the "lower teir" users about the upcoming limits, giving them the option to Upgrade with great value...

2: inform your "lower tair" users that "You won a time limited free "higher teir" unlimited account."

this ways turns the table in your favor i suppose.

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Does anybody have any data that suggests that this can erode the trust the user has in a product, even if they are technically getting more than they were promised?

This is only half the problem.

The other half is that, 'some' customers that have been paying higher-tier may feel ripped off if they find out later out that their particular needs could've been met with lower-tier product.

Ultimately, you do need to figure out a way to enforce the limit, even if it's a soft flexible limit.

People hate getting ripped off more than they like getting free stuff.

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