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Are there any UX guidelines that are to be followed targeting users of these two types :-

Apart from the screen size-

Laptop

No mouse in majority of the cases , uses touch pad and keyboard shortcuts more often.

Desktop

Uses mouse for navigation and uses less keyboard shortcuts compared to laptop users

Questions

  1. Whether laptop specific shortcuts are to be added in an app/website.

  2. Are there any specific things to be taken care , considering the fact user will not be using a mouse

  3. Thinking future , are there different kinds of navigation exclusively for touchpad users ( or even people using virtual hardwares)
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  • Well, it depends on your audience actually. The question is probably more like: are you a power-user, a regular user or a gamer... The power user will probably use a lot more keyboard shortcuts, regardless of system. Even more, putting a dependency on the type of mouse will probably not win you any medals anyway. Or - what is the value one could miss out on for using either mouse input? Regardless of that, detecting the actual system is often hard or impossible, so it's all for one, and one all :-)
    – Xabre
    Commented Sep 25, 2015 at 10:52
  • Input device shouldn't be a major factor. It could be a mouse. It could be a touchpad. It could be a keyboard. It could be a remote switch. It could be a pen tablet. Must make sure your UI works universally.
    – DA01
    Commented Sep 25, 2015 at 19:32

2 Answers 2

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Sort of. Instead of looking at as "touch pad" vs "mouse + keyboard", it may be better to look at is as "accessible regardless of input device." To accomplish that, it would be beneficial to look at the "Accessibility Standards" for the web: WCAG.

To address your questions specifically:

1. Whether laptop specific shortcuts are to be added in an app/website.

This depends heavily on your UI. A large number of applications add shortcuts, but they're generally shortcuts that are common across most applications. They rarely replace UI, but instead work in tandem with existing UI. Generally leveraged by power users, and really only beneficial if the feature saves time, will be used frequently, and can be reasonably assumed to exist without documentation.

2. Are there any specific things to be taken care , considering the fact user will not be using a mouse?

For web? Absolutely. There are standards surrounding tab order, a "skip link" for navigation menus, how to properly wrap links, and plenty more. For a full list, I recommend reading up on "accessible web" and for summaries of the WCAG linked to above.

3. Thinking future, are there different kinds of navigation exclusively for touchpad users ( or even people using virtual hardwares)?

Specific to input device, but not screen size related? There are a few guidelines for making navigation more accessible, but the touchpad vs keyboard + mouse are similar enough that most/all menus could operate similarly. That being said, navigational menus and their functionality should probably be driven more by your desired outcomes, the data you have for the menu, etc. than the input device (so long as the menu is accessible for all possible input devices)

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  • A small comment on a slight difference in navigation exclusively using touchpad vs exclusively using a mouse: trackpads often allow much easier horizontal scrolling as compared to a mouse. horizontal scrolling/scroll bars aren't used very often, but it's something to be aware of for more complex app design.
    – nightning
    Commented Sep 25, 2015 at 18:01
  • Thanks for the answer. Are there links to any useful and credible resources for point 2 which i can read?
    – Sooraj
    Commented Sep 29, 2015 at 5:53
  • Designing Accessible Navigation There are quite a few solid resources out there. A quick google of "making navigation more accessible" provided a decent number of resources -- accessibility is gaining a lot of traction due to recent law suits, so you'll start seeing more and more on it. Commented Sep 29, 2015 at 16:35
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Whether laptop specific shortcuts are to be added in an app/website.

You wouldn't be able to reliably even detect if a user is on a laptop--or if they are, that they are using a touch pad.

Are there any specific things to be taken care , considering the fact user will not be using a mouse

Make sure your entire UI is usable sans a mouse. This is a requirement in general for accessibility purposes.

Thinking future , are there different kinds of navigation exclusively for touchpad users ( or even people using virtual hardwares)

That's not future. That's now. Macbooks, for example, have all sorts of multi-touch guestures you can use to navigate. A simple example would be 2-finger swipe to navigate the web with back/forward buttons. Note that these are just enhancements to existing mouse functionality, though.

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