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My multistep flow (wizard) has long forms. We allow users to save partially completed data and exit the flow. We also allow certain users to go to a specific form to edit that without getting into the flow.

In both situations we need the ability to save partial data - i.e. data is saved without validation. What do you recommend that I name this button. It is currently called "Save Form" - I have a few issues with this - it doesn't tell the user that it a partial save/ there is no validation. "Form" - I feel might not be user friendly/ non-technical

On the flow we have the following buttons 1st "Next"; 2 thru n-1 - "Save Form" | "Previous" | "Next"; Last "Save Form" | "Previous" | "Finish"

When the user directly enters the form we have the following buttons "Save Form" (this doesn't do validation), "Cancel", "Save" (this does validation)

Thanks

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A Draft is an initial or unfinished copy of a document which is expected to have errors and need reworking. I have used this term several times in scenarios like the one you describe to indicate to the user that their work is not finished. A different color can indicate to the user that this button is distinct from the main 'Save' button, and a tooltip or message after clicking (or both) can inform them that their work is being saved without passing through your validation process.

You can also see this terminology in most email applications: a draft is a letter that you've begun composing but haven't sent out yet. Depending on the application a draft might be autosaved (i.e. if only a single entry is to be performed at a time) or, as in your case, you might prompt the user to save it, and allow them a mechanism to return to it later.

  • Welcome to UX.stackexchange. It would be useful if you could elaborate on your answer. – Mayo May 15 '15 at 18:06
  • +1 this (in its revised version) is a nice answer and the approach I would also take. Welcome to UX.SE! – tohster May 15 '15 at 18:22
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Use "Save as Draft" and implement autosave. Nothing worse than spending the time to work through a long form and failing.

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