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I'm developing an application for ticket ordering system, for each and every task there is a ticket for you,and those tickets are assign to relevant employee, and for that particular task there is a order status (Assign,Accepted,Open,Due,Competed,Not completed) currently those details shown in a data table, i want to show these information in a chart?

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    Can we get a bit more detail here, or ideally an example of what you currently have? How many orders are there? How many stages do they go through? What is it being used for? As it is written I'd just say "use a line of text - 'Status: Delivered' rather than a chart" as I'm not sure what you're trying to represent with a chart here.
    – JonW
    Mar 31, 2015 at 9:08
  • I'm developing an application for ticket ordering system, for each and every task there is a ticket for you,and those tickets are assign to relevant employee, and for that particular task there is a order status (Assign,Accepted,Open,Due,Competed,Not completed) currently those details shown in a data table, i want to show these information in a chart? Mar 31, 2015 at 9:37
  • Can you provide a screenshot or mockup of the table so it is easier to understand the structure and layout of the information so I can provide an equivalent chart for comparison?
    – Michael Lai
    Mar 31, 2015 at 22:58

2 Answers 2

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A funnel visualization communicates the flow of work through a predefined process. It's commonly seen in sales tools (to report on deal stage) and web analytics (to measure drop off).

Funnel visualization <-

For a help desk it may also be good to show overall inflow/outflow. This may help soften the blow if you guys have a bad week closing tickets or moving them through the process. (you'd be able to show that there was a massive surge of incoming tickets that week. An example of a visualization that shows flow is below:

Flow visualization

Finally, and this should be a big one if you're trying to measure performance at each stage of the process, is showing how many days tickets are staying in each stage. Steven Few style bullet graphs are used to show planned and actual performance:

Bullet graph

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I've only been a PM for 2.5 years, but I can say that the flows given in various applications like Jira, Pivotal Tracker, Assembla, and others almost never fulfill the needs I have (for organizations I've joined with these systems in place). Here's what I consider most important in flow, in order:

  • Research (just created, requires additional research and/or grooming)
  • Open (ready for work)
  • In progress
  • In code review
  • Ready for testing
  • Testing in progress
  • Tested and ready for release testing/confirmation (meaning alone it's been tested but the feature/update has not been tested against other features/functions and needs to be re-tested against the whole product/platform)
  • Testing for release
  • Ready for release

Frankly the engineering task list is minor: in queue, working on, or code reviewing. Then QA steps in and confirms/declines. Then the release manager steps in. As for how something should be listed, there are millions of adjectives, but effectively it's this: is the work accepted? Yes/no. And every step of the way it's a Yes/No question.

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