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I'm working on a step by step registration form. We are exploring an accordion style approach at the moment. (Below are my wireframes.)

Because we are using inline validation, the user cannot go to the next step if he doesn't enter a valid email address. Additionally, only work email addresses are permitted. Entering a wrong email address is therefore quite unlikely.

I feel like the only thing you want to do here is to push the user forward so that he completes his registration as quickly as possibly.

I'd like to have your opinion on whether or not we should allow the user to go back to the previous page.

Thanks :)

Accordion form

  • What's the need of separating the form in 3 steps? – Alejandro Veltri Feb 2 '15 at 21:37
  • The company I work for is building a single login across multiple sites. If the user created his account on site A, he can access site B with the same username and password but he won't know it and site B might require additional info from the user. With this approach, we can check if the email address exists at the first step and then customise the next steps accordingly. Additionally, we are also exploring a single page approach and we've been running usability tests to test both layouts. The step by step approach tends to work better for our purpose. – Leo Feb 3 '15 at 11:13
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Yes you should give user control over the app, always! It is one of the points you check for in heuristic evaluation. I use ISO 9241-110 Ergomics standard for interactive dialog and controlability is one dedicated chapter of it.

What happens, if one enters a wrong, but valid working email? How can I correct it, if I recognise the error?

A Sidenote: Why did you divided email and password? One enters it as a pair - very often. Why do I need to click continue to get to the next form field? It is nor convenient to collapse my keypad to click the button in order to click in the paasword field to see my keypad again. It feels wierd. Why not show all your fields at a glance? Are there so many, that one would stop registering? Why accordion? Does it provide a benefit to the user? Or is it just trendy? Personally I prefer a fast registration process. And this is presented best by a simple registration form - how Im used it to be.

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    yep. If I enter bobb@gmail.com this will show as perfectly valid despite my address being bob@gmail.com. Or it could be that I think later on "Nah, bob@hotmail.com is better for this kind of sign up" – the other one Feb 2 '15 at 16:51
  • Thanks for your answer. The company I work for is building a single login across multiple sites. If the user created his account on site A, he can access site B with the same username and password but he won't know it and site B might require additional info from the user. With this approach, we can check if the email address exists at the first step and then customise the next steps accordingly. Additionally, we are also exploring a single page approach and we've been running usability tests to test both layouts. The step by step approach works better for our purpose. – Leo Feb 3 '15 at 11:17
  • @Leo Even for your purpose I wont break the patterns. Users are at Sign Up page for registration. If suddenly there is message "Hey we already know you, dude" after entering email I would feel spyed. Where did they get my data from? Is my personal data somewhere floating in the net? What data do they have? How can I get control of it? You better inform people what you are going to do. Simply tell them it is possible to use that social login. Take a look at SE approach for log in/ sign up. An app doing it your way would lose all credibility for me to get any further personal information. – FrankL Feb 5 '15 at 17:29
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If it's just work emails you could always remove the need for users to enter the domain, a bit like the sign in for Slack.

Further to your question I don't think there's any harm in allowing users to go back and edit the email field. Remove the need for a domain

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i have been going throughout this issue on a Telecommunication project. However the persona and the usage are different, the old journeys have been translated from accordion off the wizard journey ( for application reason ). Its mobile reference contains same ideology; also the modus behind the journey is a shortened wizard. The validations are made on a tooltip which is pointing down the form in order to do not expand/contract the interface.

However an accordion has a vertical progression and analyzation ( in which the progression of the journey mental model would be vertical as well). User can - if needed - to get back in order to review/change his/her credentials.

Running heuristic evaluation of the user focused with the project in this case, can eventually help the interface to provide a wider chance to enter the tunnel of registration.

Sometimes it could be harsh for the user going through it since it depends on the information he/she is providing.

Accordion are fine, also giving the user the chance to review all his step once he compiled correctly the needed one. However having a 'summary page' and giving the chance to the user to review the registration process in divided 'steps' could lead to a 50-50 register success, gave by the clearance of its process.

Consider having also - in order to have a proactive registering process - to 'divide' as less as you can the steps which are in between the point (A)Register needed to (B)Be successful on the task you were doing before registering - or just simply continue what you were doing before -.

Having a simpler registration form - asking Mandatory information in which are needed to create the persona ID within your system - you can let the user modify his/her credentials once is in-to the system. Would like to void in this case to let the user think too much to register or not: The user is getting registered right now. How can i add value?

"We need your information, but the user need to do quickly as possible. Also be able to continue what he/she was doing before registering. Do not cut the user's attention with the registration form too much."

| Doesn't matter what you are using, but How you are using it and who is telling the information ( with A Tone of Voice ). Lead the user by asking exactly ( without assuming too many steps if not needed ) the action he/she Must do in order to accomplish his success; and your success.

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