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I'm developing a game which features various power creating devices, machines that require power and cables to link the two together. Because of a bug that caused the cables to drag power from the all the cables around it (meaning if arranged in a row they showed power readings exceeding what they could possibly have), I have decided that each cable will have an output face and three input faces. I would like to colour code these faces so the player can easily tell the difference between the output and input faces. Is there some sort of standard colours for these? I don't mind (and will probably have to) include some sort of tutorial explaining which colour corresponds to what, though if there is a standard I would like to stick to it.

  • What audience area are you targeting? Color standardization, to the extent it exists, almost always varies between cultures. – Nathan Tuggy Jan 18 '15 at 6:51
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I'm slightly confused. Would this question be answered if I told you about wiring color codes? If so, North America uses black, red, and blue for phases A, B, and C, they are the "hot" wires. Neutral is white and ground is green. For global metric wiring (Europe and China) phase wires are brown, black and gray; ground is green with a yellow stripe and neutral is blue.

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I am also looking for a generic input and output colour, and can't find a standard.

I have decided to use blue as input and red as output.

The reasoning is not completely arbitrary. My reasoning is that a red wire would seem "hot" and therefore is driven by a potential (in a circuit) or it is being often overwritten (software)

A blue wire seems "cold" and can will not drive anything else. Therefore it is an input.

I am avoiding green since it could be confused with "ground" or "good".

Hope it helps.

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Very old thread but was the top result so I’m writing this here for anyone asking the same question.

From what I have found, the standard for games that feature power or machine mods the input to your system is blue and output is orange. Additionally, extra outputs in systems can be symbolized with yellow and if you are using the colors for items and you additionally want a power input it would be red. This works with fluids too.

Let’s say you were setting up a system for an automatic electric furnace. The input for items, like ores, going in the furnace should be blue, you’re input for power would be red, you’re output, let’s say ingots, should be orange, and your additional output, charcoal, would be yellow. From what I have learned if you want to have both outputs go to the same place use both a coloration that is half yellow half orange. These options should be manageable from a setting UI in your machine or system and should be basic with storage systems having a default setting of input to the storage and output should be optional by using an additional item (servo) before your methods of transport (item pipe or a conveyor belt).

I am basing this completely off of my experience in developing some Minecraft mods where these were the standards they used so people playing large mod packs were not confused. the system is very easy to get accustomed to and simple for new people to understand.

To get more information just look up “feed the beast machines” and that will show a large number of guides of how the system works

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