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In CSS we have different list-style options. For example:

ol.decimal {list-style-type: decimal;}
ol.upper-roman {list-style-type: upper-roman;}
ol.lower-alpha {list-style-type: lower-alpha;} 
ol.lower-greek {list-style-type: lower-greek;}  

So...

  1. Do people (in different countries) use different list-style-type for numbering list element? (e.g. shopping list, to-do list, list of students in school, ...)
  2. If so, does Greek use greek, Japanese use katakana, Armenians armenian, ... all the time (in every situation) or maybe in a few cases ?
  3. Or maybe everyone just use decimal or very sometimes latin for everything?
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This is to ensure localization is supported and when a website translation is done, the list styles also reflect localization. For example,here is a screenshot of the number options in different languages which are supported by CSS and required by the W3 for localization

enter image description here

For example if you were localizing for Ethiopia, You would be required to use Ethiopic syllables. To quote this article about localization for Ethopia ( I had to use a screenshot since the stackoverflow textbox does not support those css codes).

enter image description here

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  • You did not quite answer any of my questions. I understand that many years ago Romans used their notation (I, II, ..., X, ...), Chinese their own, Greeks their own, etc. I really undestand that many different nations have their own notation for numbers and it is connected to localization... I could expect that sometimes some of these symbols can occur in their documents/poems. However what about nowadays and normal life ? (look at my questions...)
    – ziom
    Sep 28 '14 at 18:39
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    I think you misunderstood my answer, while the romans might have used that before and not anymore as a part of localization requirements you should be able to support it if needed.
    – Mervin
    Sep 28 '14 at 18:49
  • But are they needed? In which situations? And which ones? By whom? btw. it is obvious that I have to support list symbols if they are needed
    – ziom
    Sep 28 '14 at 18:55
  • Some situations call for different list styles, for example the contents of a book can typically use roman for the preamble and decimal for the main content. Lists of legal items can often use roman. Different people, different professions, different needs, different requirements. Sep 29 '14 at 8:12
  • @RogerAttrill Yep but it is roman, popular and standardized. Any examples of usage these national types: katakana, greek, etc.?
    – ziom
    Apr 8 '15 at 12:25
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  • Do people (in different countries) use different list-style-type for numbering list element? (e.g. shopping list, to-do list, list of students in school, ...)

Yes in some countries using different alphabets to Latin

  • If so, does Greek use greek, Japanese use katakana, Armenians armenian, ... all the time (in every situation) or maybe in a few cases ?

While not in EVERY case, depends on the place, you're mixing extremely different cultures and not giving many details about situations, so the answer is extremely broad

  • Or maybe everyone just use decimal or very sometimes latin for everything?

Most people uses ARABIC NUMERALS (if we're going to talk properly) which is what in CSS we use as decimal or decimal-leading-zero values. However, they all have uses. As an example, in western cultures, the use of Roman numbers is widespread in literature, formal documentation and such.

Finally, localization has a more important meaning: accessibility. When you use aural style sheets, it's not the same for a visually impaired person to use this:

li{list-style-type: hiragana;}

or

li{list-style-type: decimal;}

it's a world of difference. Literally.

Also, keep in mind that you can use selectors for internationalization, so depending on what you want to do and your target, you might be interested in using language targeting, like

body:lang(jp) 

for your Japanese users, and leave a regular English version for everyone else, so you'll obviously serve an appropriate version that includes listings and everything

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