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We want to understand why our customers have to call rather than find relevant information on our website. We want to find the factors so we can influence or change their behaviour in the future. Anyone has done similar research? Any suggestions / thoughts on this?

  • Is it possible to link the customers who call to their user profile or usage analytics data? Also, is there some IVR system in place that would help to filter or analyze the primary call purpose or do you have some integrated customer support platform like Zendesk? – Michael Lai Jul 10 '14 at 22:59
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Phone questionnaires are notorious for delivering bad results. It all has to do with the attitude of the caller. Most calls to a business are helpdesk related. There already is some irritation and therefor often no patience for a questionnaire when the call is over.

I think the most unintrusive way is to send the customer an email afterwards with just a few questions (1 to 5 questions). That is if you can link the caller to an email address. Otherwise you might want to send out a questionnaire to all email addresses or ask the caller to stay on the line and answer a questionnaire.

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    I agree. People who call normally have issues with their services, there will be "happy" customers, but it may create bias in the results. I'm thinking to have interviews first, then craft the survey questions to quantify the findings. Human behaviour is really complex, the challenge is how to dive in to find that trigger for change. – Ruby Jul 9 '14 at 10:19
  • Given the massive volume of email received nowadays I wonder whether people will be that happy getting more of them uninvited. – PhillipW Sep 8 '14 at 17:30
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I'd probably just start with a very quick "would you like to say why you called rather than used the website ?" at the end of the phone conversation.

This will give you unstructured data and then someone will need to go through it to try to pull out any common themes.

Once you have common themes then you might want a more structured approach.

  • That assumes they called because they couldn't find something on the website. I'd start off with something more high-level and then drill down into IF they thought about or tried finding that information on the website. – erik_lev Sep 8 '14 at 16:59

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