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The curent UX for my app is:

Terms & Conditions

text: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Pellentesque ut turpis ipsum. Ut cursus cursus scelerisque. Mauris lacus neque, sagittis non ultrices vitae, laoreet id massa. ... ... Donec vulputate sagittis bibendum. Suspendisse fermentum justo in est feugiat sed pretium velit suscipit.

checkbox: [ ] I Agree

two buttons: Accept and Decline

Is it better to remove Checkbox? (because it does repeat Accept action and creates potential logical error if user check Agree checkbox and then click on Decline)

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From a usability standpoint, yes. Efficiency dictates that you use implied agreement.

From a legality perspective, no. You should explicitly ensure users are aware of what they are agreeing to.

Explicit agreements are generally enforceable. These are usually in the form of checking a box that says you agree, or by clicking a button that says you agree.

Implicit agreements are unenforceable and have no legal weight. These are when you have something that says "by signing up for this account you agree to the terms and conditions" or something similar. Zappos and a large legal team recently found this out the hard way.

https://ux.stackexchange.com/a/36075/44432

  • Thank you. What about to leave check box and have only one button "Accept" disable while user checks the checkbox? – contrarios Apr 29 '14 at 20:00
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    The comment you quote in reference to the Zappos case is wrong. Sign up forms that include a "by signing up to this account you agree to the terms and conditions" (which links to the T&C's) are considered to be explicit agreements, because the user is taking some action, even though it's not clicking a checkbox, the user still must click the sign up button. The Zappos case showed that you can't assume that users are bound by any T&C's simply be virtue of them browsing the site and you having a T&C's link in your footer. – grover5 Apr 29 '14 at 20:10

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