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I'm designing a website and I need a visible menu for the English translation.

I'm looking for a good placement for mobile and desktop.

Right now I found 2014.ictdays.it as a good solution for the translate menu placement. It's very visible and it stands out. My only concern is that maybe it is too much visible since it will be used only once per user at most.

Do you know any other example that I can check? Is there any best practise?

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For something like this - I don't think there's a best practice. However, since your users that need the translate button can't read your page - it makes sense to have your translate button at the top of the page and not below the fold.

You have to balance the other elements on your page. You say once per user? That's a 100% use case - which means you want it to stand out. If its an edge case for example 5% of users, it doesn't need to be as prominent. Can you show us your existing site and we can provide a recommendation?

  • You're right: data is very important. I'm redesigning a very old website (www.resta.it). They have customers from all around the world but with data it will be easier to decide! – Jules Mar 1 '14 at 15:41
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First, I'd take a look at this question, because it provides a really thorough answer for your question. In that same question, there was another discussion of this issue.

My thoughts are:

Can you geolocate via IP? If so, you can default the site to the native language of the visitor.

Also, Chrome accounts for ~56% of all web traffic, and has built-in translation. Localization is important, but my understanding is that this is essentially a marketing site, so developing good content and keeping people engaged (regardless of language) is the key here.

Here are some additional articles on language best practices.

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