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Those shiny/high-gloss laptop screens, that got popular some years ago, seem to offer a horrible user-experience to me.

Isn't/wasn't any eye-strain reduction regulation against it? I thought that an anti-glare coating was a desirable design feature, but it seems that manufacturers, for some reason, don't care about it. Am I alone here?

  • totally not, years ago when i encountered one of the first new models had the same question.. – LoneXcoder Feb 7 '14 at 15:16
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My understanding is that the glossy displays had better contrast, and were therefore better for watching movies. I never liked glossy displays, though, since I spend very little time watching movies on my laptop. Interestingly, my LCD TV is not glossy...

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    Evidence should be provided for the contrast comment. Personal anecdotes should really only be used to give a bit of colour to an evidentially backed up answer. – Toni Leigh Feb 7 '14 at 16:24
  • And if you get better contrast - the screen should be better for image editing and all kinds of graphical applications, e.g. pretty much everything you do with a computer. I guess using MS DOS is an exception :) – Henrik Ekblom Feb 10 '14 at 8:40
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The reason why people buy glossy screens instead of matte ones is that the glossy screens show a bigger color range and the contrast is higher (the dark areas can show more details for example). It is however a downside to them, they reflect more background lights.

http://www.tweakandtrick.com/2012/06/matte-and-glossy-monitors-clear.html

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  • it is interesting to question why only laptops if not mostly... are equipped withe glossy screen maybe to add some protection was one of the initial reasons – LoneXcoder Feb 7 '14 at 15:19
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The answer has nothing to do with UI. People buy shiny stuff regardless of usability, it is as simple as that. The idea that it provides better contrast is a myth. Transflective screens provide better contrast but they are not glossy.

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People are naturally attracted to glossy items goes back to the human need to find water. By making something glossy you will normally increase the appeal as a result.

Although I see what you mean by user experience but actually the eyes issue is down to other factors which affect the way the eyes work.

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