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I am working on a small application, which will display pictures of cakes to the users. At this stage only admin users will have access to update content of the pages, upload pictures, etc.

I still want to keep the home page same for all the users but am cnfused about how to show the link so that the non-admin users don't start clicking the link out of nowhere. At the same time, I don't want to create different home pages for the 2 types of users. What are some good ideas/best practices to display the login link to the admin user so its not a difefernt home page for admin and the general public.

At a later date, the non-admin users might get a register and login functionality to leave comments, upload pictures, place order, etc.

  • I don't think this is really a UX question. Typically if you are serving some kind of web application you will be able to control the output of your pages and do things like hide/show elements based on server side logic. – Joshua Barron Dec 20 '13 at 2:31
  • @JoshuaBarron: Thanks for that, but I do think that this is a UX question. I am just looking for ideas or best practices to approach this issue. And I could apply some server side logic when I know how to approach this problem. When an anonymous user looks at the page, I don't know if it is an admin user or a general user and I don't think server side logic will help there. I hope that helps with some confusion – Divi Dec 20 '13 at 2:56
  • If the only people who can login are admins, simply title the link "Administrative Sign-in" or alternatively, title the link "Update Content" and then explain on that page that only admins can log in. Indicating that the sign in is only for admins will deter its use. If normal users can also login, you should just have a login link and then change your output based on admin/non-admin. – Joshua Barron Dec 20 '13 at 3:21
  • @JoshuaBarron: That's a good idea. Can you please add this as an answer instead? – Divi Dec 20 '13 at 4:18
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From my comment:

If the only people who can login are admins, simply title the link "Administrative Sign-in" or alternatively, title the link "Update Content" and then explain on that page that only admins can log in. If normal users can also login, you should just have a login link and then change your output based on admin/non-admin.

Indicating that the sign in is only for admins will deter its use; furthermore, if your group of admins is small and highly trained (expert users), you might be able to get away with further obscuring this link (a small link at the bottom of the page). I think the "Administrative Sign-in" will probably do the trick, though.

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