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This is for desktop and mobile, basically when you click the button once it changes to "Confirm" with a cancel button next to it. I got some feedback that it's not clear you have to press the button again so maybe I need to make it more clear there is a secondary action here?

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2 Answers 2

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This is a little odd:

  • Having a button proclaim itself to be a button is not necessary. So if anything it'd be "Delete" and "Confirm delete".
  • Having a button change itself instead of summoning some type of pop-up-feeling dialog for the confirmation is unusual. It's a bit more ergonomic, sure, but there do exist people who double-click everything because they haven't learned yet that in the context of the web, you don't need to double-click anything. By keeping the confirm step at the same position, a double-click may be interpreted as a very fast click onto the confirm button, you may be depriving a class of users of the confirmation step who have the highest need for it.
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    Nice answer. I'd add this to support your second point: this is the main issue for Google's CLS algorithm and UX check. While I don't completely agree with Google's implementation or even definition of CLS (let alone User Experience), it serves as a subjective measure for many people.
    – Devin
    Jan 1 at 18:34
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It's really confusing that the button changes itself into confirmation. What I suggest is to enable a "cancel deletion" button instead. What I mean is to do this:

  1. The delete button is working just fine.
  2. Once the user clicks on the delete button, the button would be changed to somethings like this: "XXX deleted. Cancel deletion" and you would give some time like 5 seconds for the user to click cancel deletion in case they deleted mistakenly in the first place.
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  • While a good idea in theory, I think in practice it implies a huge cognitive load. You're actually forcing the user to decide whether their actions are right or wrong within five seconds, and with a required interaction that takes approximately one second. I think a popup dialog with no time limit would be better.
    – Devin
    Jan 1 at 18:39
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    I agree with you. I was thinking exactly like you before I used some applications that have exactly the same approach as I mentioned. But after that I saw it's actually a very practical way and it also removes the need for the second tap by the user. You can see an example here: linkedin.com/posts/…
    – Sepas
    Jan 1 at 20:12

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