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My team and I are developing an map-based website for a client, which merges a lot of geographical information onto the map. The project itself is so innovative (not meant to sound snobbish here), that there is nothing to compare it with and no standards we could orient towards. Imagine Google Maps extended with additional information about the energy infrastructure of a region. Moreover, even the client has no precise vision of the user and tends to change the applications requirements from time to time.

Since there is no clear user or use case, I am stuck at creating random proto-personas or conducting usability tests with my colleagues, but with every requirement shift they seem to be reduced to absurdity. My question is: Can I really call myself a UX-Designer relating to this project or do I have to reconcile myself with the reality that I'm just have to implement the clients' wishes and focus my ux work on other projects?

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  • You could call yourself an digital product designer, or if you want to be more delicate, a creative director. But I'd look up to these functions if I were you :)
    – Ivan
    Sep 8, 2023 at 9:42

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Experience is everywhere. IMO, there's no reason to avoid methods and psychological patterns in your project. Is your digital product going to be used by someone? If the answer is yes, then you can have your UX, test, personas, etc.

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Moreover, even the client has no precise vision of the user and tends to change the applications requirements from time to time.

Define for yourself how much effort you are willing to put into this. Without a clear strategy you can expect this product to fail at the first attempts. I hope your client knows this as well. So expect your designs to fail, at least the first few attempts, and be prepared to learn from these failures and possibly even have to start over.

If you are ok with this approach then you can also decide on doing some research in the direction of other map applications and in the area of energy infrastructure. It will not be possible to conduct direct research into a target group, but with at least a little insight into these areas you will not be walking completely blind.

Yes, you can call yourself a UX-designer because you are still approaching it from your UX-designer persepctive, despite the little material to work with. You can still rely on the UX knowledge and skills you have. Right?

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