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In tablet sizes, Is it a good practice to have a hamburger menu and a few of the most important nav links stay outside of the hamburger?

Or is it more customary to have just nav links or just hamburger? Could there be a middle ground?

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    "Show all the nav links, then all at once switch to a hamburger?" You should elaborate on that, it seems you have an idea yet struggle to communicate it.
    – straya
    Mar 2 '20 at 1:50
  • Hi, and welcome to the site! Are you asking about frequency (ratio of apps doing this vs. doing that), or are you asking about design rationales for either? You certainly "can [..] do a middle stage", but I'm not sure what you are asking. Mar 4 '20 at 8:04
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Hamburger menus, while common, are not as easy to use as nav bars (discoverability and touch ergonomics). If there's room for all your links probably use a navbar and forgo the hamburger. If not, maybe look at analytics to pick the top few links then nest the rest in a [more v] dropdown after the main links. It really depends on the context/content and the layout and visual language of your interface. Hope you find this helpful.

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It is essential that you keep all information that is provided to desktop or laptop computers to be the same for mobile devices.

There is no need to hide something, most probably you need a re-design in your UI for mobile devices but keeping out information such as links is not ideal.

I know that there is less space in a mobile device but with proper design there are ways to provide all your important links to visitors.

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  • Thanks! I clarified the original question, I realized I had worded it oddly. Mar 2 '20 at 22:42
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I think this approach is actually quite common and in some cases necessary.

For example, consider you have 10 nav links, with a mobile or tablet this is going to hard to display without in some way hiding options (unless you make them super tiny! which will introduce usability issues in itself).

Now think about how you might analyse those links, the likelihood is that you have some which are more frequently used than others (you can verify this by tracking metrics). Or some which provide important feedback about the state of the system, which is key again for usability.

Facebook is a good example of this, the leave 5 items out of the hamburger but put everything else in it.

enter image description here

If you think about the 5 they have left out, you've got:

  1. The logo / home link - brand important and likely used often as the scale of the site is important and returning home avoids you getting lost.
  2. Search, again Facebook is a massive site, presumably metrics prove people do a lot of searching so it's given a high priority.
  3. Messenger, link to an external app which can have notifications (indications of system state) attached
  4. Notifications, provides a visual indicator of system status.
  5. Account, provides an important visual indicator that I'm logged in as who I think I am, and contains important functions like being able to logout, and other security bits.

There are many other examples of hiding less important menus behind hamburgers and leaving some outside, I can't recall loads but:

Spotify

enter image description here

Microsoft

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BBC sport (the All sport menu)

enter image description here

As a side point, a lot of sites are using both text an a humburger menu for this kind of thing, but that's a whole other kettle of fish.

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    Thank you!! this is exactly what I was asking and super helpful! Mar 6 '20 at 22:24
  • If it's helpful you perhaps upvote the answer and if you feel it's solved the problem mark it as the answer :) Mar 7 '20 at 23:36

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