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We want to keep the page as simple as possible with the appointment schedule, booking fee and payment method.

But when keeping in mind a user-centric approach, a problem that might arise would be:

What if the user wants to know if they can still cancel the booking?

Would it be a distraction to the main flow(booking) if we explain to them the cancel policy in the confirmation page?

The policy goes something like :

"You may cancel at least 24 hours before the appointment schedule to get a 100% rebate."

Take note that this app only charges the booking fee and a rebate would be given after they have cancelled, the payment for the service would be done after the service has been made.

One of the stakeholders also said that: "It would give the idea that we aren't confident of our bookings because we give the users an idea that they can cancel"

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What if the user wants to know if they can still cancel the booking?

Would it be a distraction to the main flow(booking) if we explain to them the cancel policy in the confirmation page?

What if a user wants to know cancelling policy and cannot see it in the current view, just before confirmation? It can just break the main flow at all!

Changing obstacles and uncertainty are the part of a human life, so taking these into account is definitely improves UX.

It doesn't mean, that you need to place it into confirmation page, but from your description, it seems the confirmation page is right place for this.

You can see some examples of how some companies exploit this in the main flow to maximize conversion rate (and sometimes earn some additional money):

1. Zappos have return policy as the part of the brand and the customer relationship

2. Booking.com – free cancellation enter image description here

3. Wizzair.com – changing/cancelling/holding fares
enter image description here

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Letting the user know they can cancel a booking is actually good user experience and if presented well would bolster more confidence in your product.

I think giving them an option to cancel and explaining the cancel policy (the explanation you gave is succinct and does the job) would not be a distraction in any means.

Not only would it be good UX, it would also unconsciously let the users have a feel that it is not a one-way booking that they cannot opt out when they want to.

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