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I read on here recently that a navigation label is a promise to the user that what they are about to click on is appropriately represented next. I love this. However, I am struggling to correctly label these following list items.

What label name would make the most sense to the user in this scenario? Note: The context is an employee portal / intranet.

navigation list

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    Please show what you already tried/thought. But If I understand right your question, maybe "employee benefits" or "your benefits" or "my benefits". You need to explain better where this is will displayed, what user will look for it and why they are looking for it and what is the sibling lables options. Oct 2 '19 at 12:55
  • The users are employees of a company. They use this website daily to book holidays, download vouchers, find information etc. It will be displayed in the website navigation on an employee intranet/portal. I don't want to taint anyone's opinions with what it is currently called as I am looking for what immediately makes most sense upon looking at the list.
    – Calum
    Oct 2 '19 at 13:35
  • Ok, and on your employee restricted area, you will have just these items on the menu or you will have other options? Oct 2 '19 at 13:39
  • There will be a "Company Info" menu item with various departments and business things and there will be a "News" item too.
    – Calum
    Oct 2 '19 at 14:03
  • Do you have some wireframe or template ready? Sorry about the questions but I'm trying to understand completely before suggesting something. Oct 2 '19 at 14:08
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A few suggestions:

  • Benefits: This defines all things given to an employee outside of pay, such as holidays, vacation, or other perks. You have pay and remote clocking on here as well which are not quite benefits.
  • Pay & Benefits: Addresses comments above
  • Employee Area: Designated personal area for individual items like pay, uniforms, holidays, etc.
  • Policies and Benefits: Lengthier, but covers both the perks and the regulations implied in this list.

As others have written, I'd recommend starting with these or running a card-sorting study. If users don't see all these items naturally fitting together in one list, it might be worthwhile challenging that assumption that they all belong together in the first place.

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Picking up on a couple of your comments:

The users are employees of a company. They use this website daily to book holidays, download vouchers, find information etc. It will be displayed in the website navigation on an employee intranet/portal.

and:

There will be a "Company Info" menu item with various departments and business things and there will be a "News" item too

It doesn't sound like there's a whole lot else on the main menu. Also, some options are likely to be used far more often than others. For instance, if the "Flexitime" option is about recording when an employee is going to be present for work (or recording when there were present), that sounds like something many employees might need fairly often. And while not every employee will be booking a holiday every day, when they do, they would want the option to be easily found.

With that in mind, it might be worth promoting a few of the most-used options to the main menu (e.g. Company News | Flexitime | Holidays | ...) and leaving the less well-used options behind an overflow menu (perhaps Other Benefits or one of the suggestions from ProtectedLeftTurn's answer).

If you don't already have any data on which options are the most popular, and/or need to be the most visible, then either add some analytics to the existing system or canvass opinion from your employees.

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