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I am working on an application that is mostly used by desktop users. So I am trying to perfect the use of the cursor css-rules.

First of all, I have read and tried to follow the practice of having pointer-cursor only for external (href) links but have the default-cursor (arrow) on buttons and internal links (like navigating to another application menu-item).

What I am a bit more uncertain on is the practice for text. This application contains a lot of editable data - like forms or editable content inline (in tables and other elements). I have been considering showing the text- cursor only for editable data, to indicate that the user can click to edit, and have the default-cursor for normal text, even if it is selectable. The default browser rule is usually the text-cursor for all normal text. Anyone knows if there are any unwritten standards or any widely used style guides or other sources related to this?

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I'd go with using the pointer-cursor for both of your first 2 scenarios and text-cursor for your 3rd and 4th scenarios, and use some other visual cue to distinguish between them.

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but have the default-cursor (arrow) on buttons and internal links (like navigating to another application menu-item)

Arrow doesn't generally go on buttons and links. I don't see what benefit you're getting from making it less obvious that a thing is clickable.

default-cursor for normal text, even if it is selectable

If you do that, you should also disable the text being selectable. There may be reasons to do that (see eg my answer on Why does Google use user-select: none; on the text in their google meets web app?).

If you have a webapp that is useful as a website (ie: Where a user might want to copy text from), you probably want to use the text cursor. If your webapp has no text worth copying, disabling text selection and text cursors may feel better.

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