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What is the best way to link from a block of information (essentially text, like a small block of teaser text) to additional information?

In the past I usually saw words (especially buzzwords) highlighted as a link in the text, but nowadays the internet is full with "Learn More" etc. links under the text block.

Here is an example to make it more clear:

  • Small Text of Information with link in text:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore Buzzword erat, sed diam voluptua. At vero eos et accusam et justo duo dolores et ea rebum.

  • Small text of information with "Learn More":

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore erat, sed diam voluptua. At vero eos et accusam et justo duo dolores et ea rebum. Learn More

I think the latter one looks more clear, but is the user always sure what type of information he can expect behind "Learn More"?

  • If I see the former in a Stack Exchange post, I'm double checking the link to see if it's spam. – Glorfindel Jul 4 '18 at 17:37
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There are plenty of ways to approach this.

The most common methods are by hyperlinking words as you said having an icon/arrow that acts as a call to action and the "Learn/Find out more" approach.

Hyperlinking words and adding the "Learn More" CTA are probably the most evident ways (depending on styling) that the user can click and read more information.

Buzzwords can work as long as the context is clear. If for example you are highlighting a method or product, it is probably more evident that the link will lead to something related to that.

If on the other hand you are trying to be quirky and you are linking more abstract buzzwords such as "Innovation" (or other buzzword equivalent), then this will probably affect your click through rate.

Now your question is:

I think the latter one looks more clear, but is the user always sure what type of information he can expect behind "Learn More"?

If Learn More is within close proximity of the "teaser" text then it's safe to say that most users will reach to a conclusion that these two elements are connected.

If you want to dispel all worries you can be more specific in your CTA. Something more extended such as "Learn More about X", "Our X method" or "Find out how our X product works" etc.

This will clear any confusion and will ensure that the CTA will work even if it were to stand alone. Which is always a good thing and a tiny bit of future-proofing I dare say.

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Of course the above might be overly verbose, so nowadays designers tend to try more creative methods to draw attention.

If you choose this path, just ensure your method is accessible and easy to correlate with your "teaser text".

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