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I'm working on a new website project that requires users to log in to access the content, and once logged in they can publish, share and follow content.

Since logging in is a required action to gain access. I'm using social network buttons to grant new users quick registration.

I started to question if social networks are now a negative impression for new users. Should I clearly state on my landing page that this website is not a social network. That there is no way to follow other users, and that this is not a space to share personal information.

The reason I ask is that the user experience of a landing page that only lets you log in tends to be for social networks. Facebook, Google+ and Twitter all have log ins as their main landing page.

closed as primarily opinion-based by RobbyReindeer, Andrew Martin, locationunknown, Shreyas Tripathy, Evil Closet Monkey Jun 6 '18 at 15:51

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    "The reason I ask is that the user experience of a landing page that only lets you log in tends to be for social networks. Facebook, Google+ and Twitter all have log ins as their main landing page." - to my opinion, that is hardly the case. Why would you think so? – Pavel Jun 4 '18 at 3:44
  • So how exactly is a website that allows you to publish, share and follow content not a social network? – Noctiphobia Jun 4 '18 at 9:21
  • @Noctiphobia it sounds content-focused rather than user-focused, so not exactly a social network. Social networks connect users to each other, and this one does not. – maxathousand Jun 5 '18 at 13:47
  • @PavelRyzhov I was struggling to clearly define what makes a website a social network. I assumed that if you're not connecting users together to create a network, then it's not a social network. Message forums for example allow people to like, share and post messages. I don't think we would call a forum a social network. If I have a lot of the same features as a social network, but I remove the connection between users (i.e. following, friending) then is it still a social network? – cgTag Jun 5 '18 at 14:29
  • I can see that this question would be opinion based. Any ideas on how I can update it to be relevant to UX? – cgTag Jun 5 '18 at 14:31
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Your website will provide social network services (by definition). The "it is not a social network" statement is misleading.

That "negative impression" comes from the abuse of visitor's information, and misleading/ambiguous company statements about information privacy and security.

A login mechanism made by a major corporation, is actually an information exchange mechanism. It is not for free. You provide them valuable information about your visitors.

In practice: I would state clearly what i am, not the opposite.
Along with the corporate login mechanisms, I would provide my authentication mechanism
or just my authentication mechanism, no corporate logins.

Here is a good example for your case: www.tumblr.com

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