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I'm currently looking at a refining our new customer sign up form (ecomm site).

Due to all of the recent coverage and greater acceptability of different/none genders - how would it be best to represent this segment in the 'Title' field which traditionally contains titles such as:

  • Mr
  • Mrs
  • Dr
  • Ms etc.

Or is there currently no need for this variety of options. The site will have users that identify outside of the fields we currently have and may feel excluded by this - hence my thinking it might be a good idea to include them.

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    You might find it useful to read both the answers and the comments on this question: ux.stackexchange.com/questions/106370/… - While not directly about the same thing it generated a lot of discussion about the representation of gender. The only advice I would give you is that it's very complex and, if you don't actually need that data, don't collect it. – Andrew Martin Feb 14 '18 at 10:16
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First off I would ask myself the question: What value do we get from having users answer this question?

If the value is negligible then don't include it in your form.
See the second point on this article. Reducing unnecessary fields will boost conversions.

Nobody likes filling out forms, make it quick and breezy for the users.

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    Exactly what I was thinking, especially with the increased number of gender options in use recently. Even for Title, there are way too many to deal with and it adds little real value. – Steve Jones Feb 14 '18 at 10:30
  • We don't need the data, I was merely thinking about making customers feel included at this stage and not alienated. I understand about form design etc. this was an extra thought I had. I guess the old saying 'if it aint broke don't fix it' comes in here. – sclarke Feb 14 '18 at 10:32
  • I don't think adding more fields in a form will make anyone feel more included- just a hunch though. If you don't need it, don't ask for it! – RobbyReindeer Feb 14 '18 at 10:43
  • Plus: you might end up missing out a non-traditional gender which somebody associates themselves with. The result will be the feeling of alienation. So avoid this at all costs. P:S. this is your answer ;) – RobbyReindeer Feb 15 '18 at 7:39
  • @sclarke still not the right answer? – RobbyReindeer May 18 '18 at 6:35

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